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Thread: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    We pulled off the keel and the bow eyebolt (looks like it was actually part of a turnbuckle!) yesterday. The keel fasteners were rotted away to where it easily was pried off. I drove two hours to pick up some plywood seat boxes as well, they are from a glasply cabin cruiser. One has a sink in the top and the other a stove, and the seats are designed to flip up so you can cook. It seemed like a very efficient use of space, so hopefully they can be adapted for use in the ClipperCraft.

    I cleaned the the little hand pump that is mounted next to the sink, it had a wasp inside the spout! Otherwise it cleaned up easily and the check valve and leather were in great shape!

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    I've been busy working on my neighbor's boat...his electrical system is all messed up. I went to the shop with my dad and we looked at what needs done. Lots of sanding! I sanded for about three hours and got most of the starboard bottom exposed. I have a section of the bow to finish tomorrow. The seam has lifted and I need to refasten the inner section before I finish sanding the joint. The gnarly pink booger is an patch of a thru hull that was a little eductor with a plug for emptying the bilge on plane..


    My dad's project while I was standing...the sternpost cap. He cut it out and shaped it on the jointer. He planed a 1/2" flat on it for a stainless oval strap.


    Closeup. After fitting it up he glued and screwed it on. More sanding!


    I'm going to try to get the rest of the bottom sanded tomorrow, we'll see how far I get. A boatbuilder friend of mine recommended a festool sander with a dust extractor. It is amazing! It literally collects 95% of the dust! The sandpaper lasts a lot longer too because it isn't all clogged up with dust.

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    I have nothing to contribute but just wanted to say I'm following and enjoying the progress. Looks great!

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    I've been sanding like crazy...almost have the bottom finished. I need to sand the sides down a bit as well after I finish up the bottom. A friend picked up some 3/4" galvanized screws from Tacoma Screw Products for me, as the 1" ones I bought are a tiny bit too long after countersinking for refastening the bottom.

    A while back a good samaritan contacted me and offered these nameplates for my boat. He sent them for free...thanks again! I also found an uninstalled data plate. Pretty cool!



    I've been collecting cleats, vents, running lights, seats, wire, and electrical components for the build. Sexton's Marine in Portland is a great source for vintage hardware!

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    I noticed something interesting as I was looking through some old photographs I'd saved of various builds. This bartender build has almost the exact same lines as the ClipperCraft, now that I have it upside down for comparison. I can see why George Calkins told ClipperCraft to stop building the BarClipper!







  6. #41
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Here are some of the items I've collected to install on the boat. The bullet cleats are pretty decent size, I was planning on using them amidships for spring lines. The smaller cleats I'd like to use for fenders but I need to find two more.



    I'm planning on putting the smaller bitt forward and the larger on the stern.


    I found an LED bulb to place in the running light socket.


    I have one tachometer/digital readout Mercury smartcraft gauge to install in the panel, along with a blower switch and the ignition. The vent is actual cast bronze, not sheet metal.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Sanding and more sanding! I finished sanding the bottom of the boat and sanded the sides, about 7 hours of sanding for this last part. I think the little bit of paint left in some of the grain will just have to start put...otherwise I'll just sand through the first layer!



    Mocking up the jet to check the tolerances. It fit almost perfect, we need to router down the bottom about 1/8" to accommodate the fiberglass and resin we'll be installing.
    j

    We're going to put some skegs along the sides of the jet and a ramp up along the front.


    Another view of the mock up.

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    I'm back from a few month hiatus on the boat project (work!) so I've been getting up to speed on what needs done next. Refastening! I bought a countersink at Lowe's and it was severely bent before I took it out of the package so I've been using my old one, but it would be nice to have two so I can leave them set up for different screw lengths i.e. one for 3/4" screws and the other for 1" screws.

    I've put in about 450 screws and have only completed half the bottom and both chines. I have to buy more screws before I can finish the bottom. I have a lot of sanding, filling, and fairing to keep me busy until my screws arrive. Here are a few pics of the refastening project.





  9. #44
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Spent the day finishing up refastening the bottom and drove another 250 screws, I think I'm up to between 600 and 700 total. Seems like a lot for a 20' boat...and I still need to refasten the sides to the frames. Getting closer! There is a lot of work to do getting the jet tunnel faired out and finished. I've been sanding and sanding too...doesn't seem like much progress but it is getting smoother and closer to glassing.

    We were discussing what order to glass the hull. I've seen in other build threads people glass the sides first and then the bottom. Is there a reason for this? We are planning on taping all the corners first and then glassing the hull.

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Looking good Powerwagon. No answer for you on glassing the sides vs. the bottom first. I've never done it. But that jet installation sure looks like the business. I'll be curious to see how she goes!

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Great project! Love the Jet drive conversion. Whereabouts in SW Washington are you? I love visiting Long Beach peninsula and Ilwaco. I want to cross the Bar some day (twice).

    As far as the fiberglassing, it doesn't really matter. Do what's easier for you. As long as the joint is strong, its good.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

    Ben Sebens, RN

    15' Welsford Navigator Inconceivable
    16' W. Simmons Mattinicus double ender ​Matty

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    I'm down by Cathlamet, I love the Ilwaco, Long Beach, Ocean Park, Oysterville area. Willapa Bay is awesome too...beautiful scenery and a lot of great history. Some of the houses in Ocean Park are fascinating...the Wreckage, the door house, etc. and Jack's!

    Sanded the rest of the paint off and faired the bottom, then scraped the last of the paint and varnish along the sheer batten. The bottom of the batten needs to be filleted to the hull so the fiberglass will lay smoothly over it. We were going to rip a small triangular strip to install there but it keeps breaking/twisting towards the bow when we try to fit it. So plan B.



    There is a lot of screw head filling in my future! We have to finish fairing up the tunnel and install the foam in the void above the jet nozzle and reverse bucket as well as fairing the sides where the transom addition joint is located. I have a feeling that is going to take longer than expected. thank goodness for my fancy sander!



    Thought I'd throw in the sunset last night on the Columbia River...gotta get the boat done so I can get out there!


  13. #48
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    We've been busy working on the tunnel...designing as you go takes a lot of time! We want to make sure it is very strong, as we will have 200 hp acting on the top portion. It will be integrated into the bottom and the transom, to spread the load. Lots of fillets and tape! We added a little wedge as a transition where the top of the tunnel meets the transom so that we could glass them together and really integrate the tunnel as part of the hull. The clamp is weighing down the little wedge filler piece being glued in.





    My dad made up some strips and laminated a new sheer batten under the deck, it came out great. It looks fair so with a little sanding tomorrow we can do the other side. We have a LOT of fairing to smooth the transition from the old hull to the addition.


    j

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    We did a lot of glueing today. the last seam on the tunnel was sealed up so the hull is finally watertight. Fillets and tape on several joints and sealing the exposed wood. I think this is going to be unbelievably strong, but it's better to overbuild than under build.

    Still filling all those screw holes, not very exciting but kind of a zen process.









    My my dad put on the other laminated sheer batten, it's coming along...my goal is that it won't be noticeable when someone looks at the boat. Fairing!


  15. #50
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Took some time off from the boat project to go to the boat show in Seattle. Wow! It seems like it is bigger every year, with all kinds of amazing new electronics and electric propulsion systems. Very cool...also lots of fiberglass and aluminum wake masters.

    I decided since we're having a cold snap it would be a good time to put together the gauge panel. I ordered some old style 'deluxe' Stewart Warner gauges that are very similar to the ones that were used originally (if not identical). I scored a really nice mercruiser gauge plate, polished it up, and had a decal made as the old one was pretty beat up.



    I tried to place the gauges into the holes and...they don't sit flush. The bottom of the bezel isn't pressed down all the way so it sits proud. I checked all three and they are the same! I already sent back the ammeter once as the numbers were not printed completely on the first unit I received. Sending all three back is just a pain in the patoot.









    You can see where the bezels are raised. I was hoping to get the panel wired up and make sure I wasn't forgetting anything or missing any parts. Stewart Warner is not impressing me with their quality control! I know the gauges should fit because they are the same size and brand as the ones I'm replacing. Oh well...at least I'm not waiting on this to get the engine tested.
    Last edited by Powerwagon; 02-05-2019 at 07:57 PM.

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Am I missing something -- those gauges are keyed, and from what I can see in the photos, when you shot them the keys weren't in their slots.
    -Dave

  17. #52
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    That's what I thought at first too. If you look closely at the body of the gauge, the indexing bump on it goes into the key slot on the plate...the bezel edge is proud to the side of the indexing bump, not in line with it. They were oriented properly and wouldn't turn in the plate, but they wouldn't sit flush. The raised section that wasn't pressed down actually went out to the edge of the bezel so I couldn't just file away a little more material on the plate as it would be visible.

    I compared them to the old crusty SW gauges that were in the panel when I bought it and the old ones sit flush. The bezel isn't raised, it is kind of bent around the bump on the body. I'm a long way off from actually installing the panel so I have time to figure it out.

    Edit: You can see it better in this picture

    Last edited by Powerwagon; 02-05-2019 at 10:14 PM.

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    As an aside, I have noticed that older plywood boats sometimes have 'bottom battens' or stringers that are equally spaced along the bottom below the frames. The ClipperCraft I'm restoring has these fore and aft stringers every 4" and they are 4" wide. A few plywood boat plans I've collected, designed by Ed Monk, also use this building technique. The bartender and some other plywood boats use a more traditional frame setup, more frames with no stringers, just the chine log and the keel. Was there an advantage to one or the other style of construction? Maybe one is easier to build (stringers would be my guess)? It's 23 here so I'm working on other projects today and feeding the wood stove.

    edit: here is an example of the ClipperCraft construction method.

    Last edited by Powerwagon; 02-06-2019 at 11:56 AM.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    I've been away from the project the last week and a half studying for some Coast Guard exams...thankfully that's over! I received new features from Stewart Warner and they had a similar problem, so I decided to file off the raised part of the bezel. Worked perfect, now they sit flush in their holes and look great. The SW tech engineer I corresponded with said they had an issue with their tooling and they were sorting it out. Alls well that ends well, I'm glad to move forward.

    I put together the panel last night, it came out pretty decent. I found an NOS mercruiser ignition switch which a bezel that matches the gauges, kind of makes the panel symmetrical. The switch by the fuel gauge is so that you can switch from port to starboard fuel tank indications, the pull switch on the left is going to be for the blower. The Smartcraft gauge doesn't look too out of place...



  20. #55
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    st.louis mo.
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Curious why you have both Amps and Volts?
    Simmons Sea Skiff build photos here:
    https://photos.google.com/share/AF1Q...92a21VWm02bmhR

  21. #56
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    It isn't necessary, a voltmeter would probably suffice. The voltmeter will tell you when your cells are becoming discharged and will show that the batteries are charging while underway. The ammeter will indicate how much current is going into the battery while charging and what I'm drawing when the engine is off. It will let me know what I'm drawing at anchor or at the dock. If the charge current remains high after a reasonable period of charge time underway, the battery is going bad, even if it is showing 13 volts.

  22. #57
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Filled the rest of the screw holes today. Added a little more tape to the tunnel as well. It takes a lot longer to fill 650+ screw holes than I anticipated. Things are coming along, I'm feeling good about our progress. I learned how to use a putty knife to fill the holes without leaving a void from the 'tips from a shipwright' series. I learn something new (or more than one) every time I watch one of the episodes.



    Looking forward to getting the bottom faired and ready for glass.

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    It's been a while since I posted but I've been chipping away on the boat project when I'm home. Fairing and sanding is not very exciting...

    I finished filling all all the screwheads and sanding them down.




    We started fairing in the new transom section.




    More sanding and fairing...


  24. #59
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Sanding and filling, about 7-8 lifts.




    Shes getting pretty smooth at this point, I want to make sure the extension looks seamless when we glass it over and paint it.




    The other side of the hull, basically the same thing. So much sanding. We bought an 18" automotive foam sanding block to help fair it in, it works great for finding the low spots.


  25. #60
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Memorial Day was wonderful here down on the Columbia. Our yacht club had a three day weekend of festivities, including a blind dingy race, sailboat race, salmon and oyster feeds, a moment of silence and recital of "In Flanders Fields." Lots of boating but not in my boat...now I'm back to working on the old girl. We did some more fairing and glassed the seams.




    The bow and bottom will have a stem/keel laminated on after we glass the hull.




    Closeup up of a seam...the boat was soaking up a lot of resin! We had to go back over and add resin as the tape was 'drying out'. Hopefully that means we'll have strong bonds.


  26. #61
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    We have been discussing different options for making the boat seaworthy and safe. These conversations, as well as studying my set of 22' Bartender plans, made me realize that my ClipperCraft is missing a component that Bartenders, Lavro double ended fishing boats, and a few power dories I've seen all have - a variation on a 'lifting spray rail' that widens out aft. The two other photos of BarClippers I've posted show that they were built with a small lifting spray rail. I am considering installing one loosely adapted from the bartender, as it is a tried and true design. Does anyone have any experience with these?

    Another modification we are considering is installing two skegs/runners that taper upward aft to give the stern some lateral resistance in a turn. I'd like them to do several other things...protect the jet intake if we go aground, keep air from coming in sideways and making the jet cavitate in a turn, and protect the hull. We don't have any deadrise aft so I'm not overly concerned with jet cavitation but I have read that can be an issue. This seems like a pretty special case but if anyone has any info about this I'd like to hear your experience.

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    The previously taped edges were sanded, chine edge rounded over a little, and then the chines were double taped with 4" and then 6" glass.


  28. #63
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Looking good Powerwagon. Regarding the spray rails, you might find this blog post useful:

    http://dory-man.blogspot.com/2012/06...ull-plane.html

    and this, although you may have seen it already?

    http://dory-man.blogspot.com/2010/01...dark-side.html

    In any case Doryman has experience with both the Bartender and Clipper Craft hulls so it might be worth reaching out to him with your question. My concern would be that if you get it wrong it could cause stability issues especially when turning, maybe even the dreaded "chine trip":

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...p-on-her-chine

    Just some things to think about in any case.

  29. #64
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    I have followed the Doryman, itís a cool blog. The inboard engine BarClipper pictures I have actually came from that link. Reaching out to him seems like a good idea, tripping or even chine walking is not good. I donít really know how this boat is going to react or handle as Iíve never had it in the water. The jet also changes the performance characteristics because the thrust is in line with the bottom, as opposed to an outboard or I/O, where the thrust is below the bottom, causing some degree of torque and resultant bow lift. Iím sure Iíll have to make some modifications after our sea trials...might need a trim tab or little fins like the Grain Oí Sand.

  30. #65
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Back from work and back at it! After we taped the seams I've started fairing them smooth for the sheathing.




    I am making a fillet around the underside of the rubrail, so the glass will sit smoother, but also so that it ties the hull deck joint together better. Some of you might remember there is no 'sheer clamp' inside the boat, it uses the rubrail and the toe rail instead.




    Closeup of my fillet...Denise would not be impressed! I still have to do some fairing...


  31. #66
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    Default

    I'm actually very impressed I had no idea on the size of the project until now!

    it's probably a question I don't need to ask, but what are you using for fairing? I've found wood flour is just almost as hard/bad as using cabosil for fairing. Fairing compounds, microballoons made for that type of operation are worth having.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  32. #67
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    I think it’s 407 low density fairing filler. It is more to make the glass lay smooth than it is structural.

  33. #68
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Made some more fillets yesterday and tried a caulking tube of west system six 10. I was pretty impressed with it! It was much easier to lay down a long section without having to stop and mix more epoxy. I should have bought a second mixing tip, as I didn't use the whole tube before the glue started to kick. Does anyone have experience with six 10? I also bought a cheap electric caulking gun...that thing is awesome. it makes laying down long, even beads really easy.

  34. #69
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    West 610 is good stuff, although you don't want to sand it if you can help it! Much harder that their 407.

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