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Thread: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

  1. #1
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    Default Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    I posted another thread about the hull deck joint on my ClipperCraft and received some interest so I thought I'd post a few pics about her and what I'm trying to do. I'm a beginner to boat building and restoration although I have experience with boats and sailing. I've been reading up on boat construction and design...I started with Sam Devlin's book on stitch and glue boatbuilding and have been reading S.S Rabl's Practical Principles of Naval Architecture. I just started Rabl's Boat Building in your Own Backyard...so much to learn!

    I believe this ClipperCraft is a rare design, possibly a one off. The only other one I have seen that is similar is a sweet inboard double ender called a BarClipper which appears to be a copy of a Bartender. The boat I'm working on has a funny transom that looks like they truncated the double ended stern and installed an I/O. Does anyone know any more about these boats? It looks like this boat has been sitting in a barn for 25+ years so it is incredibly dry, making it the perfect candidate for a restoration.

    As mentioned in my previous thread, my plan is to strip the hull to bare wood and repair any rotten areas (the bottom of the transom was rotten), refasten the bottom, then fiberglass the outside of the hull. I want to sand the entire interior and seal it with epoxy, fillet the frames, and install a new propulsion system.

    So far I've removed the old engine and out drive, fuel tanks, wiring, and cut out the rotten area of the transom. I've stripped one side of the hull to bare wood and am currently working on the other side. I'm working with my dad, who is very knowledgable about boats, so this is kind of a father/son project and an opportunity to learn from my old man. We are designing a new stern...hoping to make her back into a double ender.

    The propulsion system I chose has turned out to be a lot more difficult to install than I had anticipated. We are installing a Mercury SportJet. They don't sell 'kits' for the SportJet, and the installation manual is an ordered part...it doesn't come with the jet or the engine. All of the other components needed are also sold separately so it is a challenge! We have to construct a 'tunnel' for the jet to sit in. I am aware of the pitfalls of jets, but they are perfectly suited to where I live along the Columbia River.

    Here is a link to my previous thread with some pics of the boat.

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ction-Question







    Here is a picture of someone else's construction, the jet is below and you can see where the power head mounts on the shaft.





    Today we worked on removing 3/8" of the plywood bottom so we can glue in a new piece. The installed piece will be the bottom edges of the 'tunnel'. The actual tunnel walls have to be 3/8" thick for installation tolerances so we are going to use a sheet of Garolite G-10. Here is the cutout for the intake of the jet.

    Last edited by Powerwagon; 04-18-2017 at 10:16 AM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    So what we have here is a 'BarClipper' built by Jim Staley, however he was building it and opted to stop at frame 2 and slap a transom on it. This was to make it capable of the IO, and I'd venture he did it at the request of a customer. Yes, the classic ClipperCraft lapstrake boats were built in this era, but they were flat bottomed then, the Kokanee version didn't come about until later.

    I have a wealth of information on Clippercraft in the later years, but not much from the 1960's. Back then it was just Jim and maybe one or two others.

    Your inspiration for completing the build should be the Bartender Grain o' Sand



    This is a 26' boat built for a Hamilton pump. It's in the old articles in WB. This particular setup will allow you to use the existing transom to build out, then use the hull to shroud the pump, leaving room for the reverse gate, linkages, etc.

    Neat project, i'll be following along closely. Maybe if you drift over to Spokane, bring her with. If I'm down that way, I might bug you for a look.

    E

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Spokaloo - the Grain O' Sand is an inspiration. I was planning on building a bartender prior to finding this BarClipper with a truncated stern. The boat is beautiful and I'd love to learn more history, both of the boat and the brand. I love the Bartender design and would love to see more pictures of the Grain O' Sand. I have only seen the ones from the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Show.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Get the back issue with the writeup, it's worth it.

    E

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Will do. If you have any other ClipperCraft info/pictures please share! There isn't a lot out there. I found an old ClipperCraft brochure from the 60s and some later sales literature from the Bay Area but that's about it.














  6. #6
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    I've got about 20 megs of stuff relating to the later boats, more in the 1970s/80s/90s era. Not sure how applicable it is in your situation, but I could upload it to somewhere if you have a spot for it.

    E

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Spokaloo - I'm not sure where to upload that much data...maybe via email?

    We worked on the old girl again today. This part seems the hardest because the jet tunnel construction has to be strong, precise, and blend with the new stern. We glued down a new section of bilge that builds it back up to original thickness with fresh wood to build on. It is the first non demolition project we've done so far.




  8. #8
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    A dropbox or something like that is probably easiest.

    I'd also recommend a cradle of some sort to do your project in. This kind of work on the trailer can mess up the hull shape slightly. I have a set of roller cradles I'd loan you, if you wanted to drive up to Spokane to get them.

    E

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    We definitely need to get the boat off the trailer. I have a heavy duty dolly (actually for my slide in camper) that we were going to modify for the boat. I might take you up on the dolly offer, I'll talk to my dad. We built a gantry to help pick up the boat so we can slide the trailer out.

    I dont have a dropbox..ill look into it. Thanks!

    edit: Here are some pictures of the interior of the boat and the helm station. I posted a question about folding boat seats a few months back as I was trying to figure out what seats were originally installed. It seems like seating arrangements in boats this size are problematic...they take up a lot of space or are uncomfortable. I'd like to install the seats on top the fuel tank boxes.

    helm station



    as she looks now

    Last edited by Powerwagon; 04-21-2017 at 08:32 AM.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Worked on the boat a little bit today. It seems like there are is a lot more thinking, measuring, thinking, remeasuring, mocking up, making another template, thinking, and measuring than it appears reading these build threads! Maybe I'm just really slow.

    I measured a centerline, which seems to vary depending on what I measured from, and marked the final cutout for the jet.



    Figuring out where the new transom is going to go is a bit of a challenge...how to make reverse work?



    Transom mock up.



    The jet nozzle will be a little over an inch lower once the cutout is made...every time I look at this I have more respect for yacht designers and boatbuilders.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    Just keep it high enough for the reverse bucket to move properly. You aren't worried about a wave hitting a transom that narrow, so it can be a bit more exposed down by the pump, with the rest shaped as you like for the big wave that might poop you.

    E

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    It seems like there are is a lot more thinking, measuring, thinking, remeasuring, mocking up, making another template, thinking, and measuring than it appears reading these build threads!
    I suspect so. Some keep a comfortable chair in a corner of the shop to sit and figure things out.
    -Dave

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Rebuilding and Repowering a 1966 ClipperCraft

    I spent most of my shop time today thinking, measuring, and realizing that my plan needs revised again. The waterline needs to be above the top of the jet nozzle and in the current configuration it wouldn't be completely submerged. Additionally, the reverse bucket outlets would terminate right into the transom limiting their effectiveness. We have an old oak chair for pondering...it is pretty comfy.

    Some research indicated that the jet intake can protrude slightly below the bottom of the boat, so rather than cut out the hull further, I figured the nozzle can be lowered over 2" by pressing the jet up against the hull bottom and making a tapered fairing around the outer edge. This also seems to solve another problem as the reverse bucket outlets are low enough to discharge under the boat. Sweet!

    I spent some some time modifying the gantry we built to accommodate a little trolley. I added some angle iron on top and made some cheeks to straddle the 2x6s.



    The next step is to build the stern extension. :O Still trying to figure out where to start.

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