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Thread: The Cruise Control 5.2 (17fter)

  1. #1
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    Default The Cruise Control 5.2 (17fter)

    Just thought I'd share a couple of photo's of one of our designs that is about to be launched in Western Australia. Tomorrow it gets pulled out of the shed with 6mm (1/4") to spare from the top of the garage roller door, hitched up to the car, then on Monday with all the camping gear on board, it a 1000 km (621 mile journey up the West Coast of Oz to Shark Bay for it's maiden launching.

    I asked Phil why he didn't launch it just around the corner?
    "Don't have time, we'll launch it on our holidays up the coast"

    We're looking forward to seeing it launched and on the water.
    ----
    For those that are wondering, her construction is strip plank composite
    She may not be traditional in her style, but she's still a "wooden boat"




  2. #2
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    Default Re: The Cruise Control 5.2 (17fter)

    Mark,

    Beyond any aesthetic consideration, what advantages does strip plank construction give you in the design of these boats over plywood? Why was it necessary? Just interested.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: The Cruise Control 5.2 (17fter)

    what a beautiful boat. I love that style, and you've done a terrific job. envious.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: The Cruise Control 5.2 (17fter)

    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Pearson View Post
    Mark,

    Beyond any aesthetic consideration, what advantages does strip plank construction give you in the design of these boats over plywood? Why was it necessary? Just interested.
    It would free the designer from the constraints of conical projection, particularly in the area around the stem and forefoot where a lot of power boats are a bit bulbous.
    Thats a stunning build, wonderfully well done.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: The Cruise Control 5.2 (17fter)

    Judging by many of the finished boats of Marks designs i have seen photos of, those Ozzy blokes must sure like sanding...and sanding....and sanding. Must be too much sun......

    Top notch finish.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: The Cruise Control 5.2 (17fter)

    Nice. I can see tyhe subtle "S" shape to both the sheer and the line of the stem. " Looks right , is right," eh?

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: The Cruise Control 5.2 (17fter)

    G'day all,
    Just to go thru a few qustions:
    Edward Pearson
    Beyond any aesthetic consideration, what advantages does strip plank construction give you in the design of these boats over plywood? Why was it necessary? Just interested.
    Strip plank you can do a lot more with as far as shape and build ability is concerned, as you not limited by flat panels. This why you find most game boats that are built in the US are either built from strip plank or they are cold molded. The Cruise Control 5.2 was actually originally designed to be of plywood construction, but the client who commissioned the design, changed his mind at the last moment and asked for strip plank instead. So without changing the shape of the hull/ cabin, I simply re-engineered it for strip plank and changed the interior structure to suit.

    As for strength, here's an interesting test that one of our builders did in the Phillipines. Enjoy reading and watching the video's.
    http://bowdidgemarinedesigns.com/Forum/viewtopic.php?f=40&t=1722






    skaraborgcraft
    Judging by many of the finished boats of Marks designs i have seen photos of, those Ozzy blokes must sure like sanding...and sanding....and sanding. Must be too much sun......
    As for the sanding...sanding...sanding, in reality, its no more than what your doing. The more your take care with your build in its preparation, the less sanding your do. This applies to all craft or types of builds. As for bogging the hull, all your doing is filling the weave of the Double Bias with a fairing powder/ resin mix and its really very easy to fair. Doesn't take long at all. Crikey, with our own RipTide 457, I had the boat all faired and ready to paint in 1 day.

    As for ozzie builders, actually only around 60% of our boats are being built in Oz, the rest are in either the US/ Brazil/ South Africa or Europe. Here's a photo of just one of many of our elderly builders in the US, James from South Carolina who is soon to launch himself. He decided to add a touch of "traditionalism" to his boat with his coaming and a few other bits and pieces within








  8. #8
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    Default Re: The Cruise Control 5.2 (17fter)

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul356 View Post
    what a beautiful boat. I love that style, and you've done a terrific job. envious.
    Thanks Paul. glad you like it
    Last edited by Mark Bowdidge; 04-06-2017 at 06:06 PM.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: The Cruise Control 5.2 (17fter)

    Last edited by Edward Pearson; 04-06-2017 at 07:42 PM.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: The Cruise Control 5.2 (17fter)

    For those that didn't see the link above, I've re-posted Earls comments here:

    Recently talking with Earl, who is building the Pro Tournament 24 from the Philippines, and one of the concerns he had was the material that is available. So we talked about using different materials and in the end I mentioned about building his boat from Plywood, but strip planking it as per a normal strip plank hull using Paulownia or Western Red Cedar. His concern though was that the plywood available is absolutely rubbish. In other words, you can drive a screw into it and basically pull it out with your hands, its that weak.
    Not a problem I said, we'll engineer it differently, then let's do an impact test as per commercial standards.
    So he built a test panel, stripping a panel as per normal with the spaces between the planks, and then using the lamination schedule as per the PT 24. Now the drop test could begin.

    You'll note in the test that he's using a 16 kg weight. The test itself under the standards, only requires 15 kg.
    The panel laminate thickness where the objects are hitting represents the inside of the hull which is 1.854mm thick or 3 layers of 450gm Double Bias. (The outside of the hull has 3 laminations). In this case to pass the test, the drop height need not exceed 1.4m. But in the video, you can see the weight was dropped from a height of 2m with little effect on the panel or glass and with no de-laminations.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4cQfJu-RT9g

    In the 2nd video below, this simulates a boat doing approx 20 kts and hitting a submerged log, shipping container or whatever with a sharp point. In order to pass this test, the claw of the hammer must not penetrate the glass. Here once again it passes easily

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yKSP8njbtZw

    Overall, these test show just how strong our boats are
    I'd like to thank Earl very much for the videos & the tests.
    --------------
    Mark,
    2nd set of tests done. 2.5m,3.0m, and 4m. The 2.5m drop caught the panel badly on the edge of the flat, or more likely the handle. This left an indentation of .4mm about 2 inches in length. No fracturing or any sign of immediate puncture, water may get in through capiliary action I would guess. 3.m drop, a little discoulouring like bruising, nothing else. Last 2 tests at 4m drop. The weight hit the board and rebounded about 5 feet back into the air-we could not find any mark or damage. We repeated at 4m and this time the weight rebounded about 7feet up, eventually falling and fing its mark on a large flower pot. There was also a bruising mark on the board. No sign of any significant damage or breakeage of the skin. Conclusion-Amazing! bomb proof. I doupt any ordinary marlin would even scratch our hide.
    Here are the vids;

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdyLoK-ldqQ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gO4BNdMxdg

    Regarding the claw hammer test-deepest indent was 0.42mm.
    Cheers Mark, this really was a worthwhile excersise, not just for confidece, but for understanding. Thanks for you help and support.

    Earl.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: The Cruise Control 5.2 (17fter)

    Nice info on that testing!

  12. #12
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    Default Re: The Cruise Control 5.2 (17fter)

    Phil and his son in law Michael hitting it hard today off Shark Bay, Western Australia in their new Cruise Control 5.2 that Phil built









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