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Thread: Trysail vs. a fourth mainsail reefing point

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Oak View, CA, USA
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: Trysail vs. a fourth mainsail reefing point

    I'm seeing that each boat has its own particulars with trysail size, set up, sheet angles and so on. Glad your solution is working for you. I will be adding a dedicated trysail track to my mast soon. Curious that one isn't in place already given my boat's history from previous owner of sailing around the world twice!

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Oak View, CA, USA
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: Trysail vs. a fourth mainsail reefing point

    Remembered the other day seeing a storm jib in MINKE's locker in addition to the trysail. After a year of ownership and getting certain upgrades, repairs and sea trials conducted finally laid them out on the dock for inspection. Both look brand new and hard to tell if even used. I don't have a dedicated trysail track on MINKE's mast and intend to put one on soon. With the round the world experience of the previous owner I can't imagine him removing the mainsail from its track to put on the trysail in the conditions that would warrant it. Makes me wonder if he just used a third reef + staysail reefed. I wouldn't want to have an active boom in those conditions given its length though...
    Last edited by SaltyGaffer; 04-05-2017 at 03:49 PM.

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BC Coast
    Posts
    3,378

    Default Re: Trysail vs. a fourth mainsail reefing point

    Last night I re-read the annex on heavy weather in the 'Venturesome Voyages of Captain Voss' of Tillicum and Sea Queen fame (first re-read in probably 30 years). Its a good read, and reflects his considerable experience. Much of that was on small sealing schooners 40 to70 odd gross tons (50 to 70 odd feet long), sailing in the high North Pacific, mostly in winter, ( I guess that was sealing season?).
    I won't try to quote him here, but basically he strongly recommends heaving-to under appropriately reduced sail and/or riding to a sea anchor as the best storm tactics for a small sailing vessel. He specifically advises against running due to the risk of broaching, even when towing a drogue or hawser, even when you do have sea room. He often carried a reefed mizzen, while riding to a sea anchor, He makes no specific mention of trying to ride to a sea anchor with the wind and sea ~4 points off the bow using a bridle, as recommended by the Pardey's, but allows that sort of angle is acceptable.
    He also provides detailed instructions for making a properly sized sea anchor.
    FWIW his comments reflect nearly exactly my own experience, though I do not have anything that resembles his experience of small vessels offshore.
    He does talk about entering a river mouth over a bar under sail towing a sea anchor. Someone with more experience running a bar can opine that, I have only crossed a bar a few times in sail boats, and am very nervous and cautious.
    He states he prefers a divided rig for sailing offshore...yawl, ketch or schooner, and then yawl-schooner and ketch-schooner....not sure what the last two mean, but guessing perhaps a 3 masted schooner with a small mizzen, or perhaps just a schooner/ketch with both masts carrying equal or similar sized sails. Any ideas out there? speculation?
    Last edited by gilberj; 04-05-2017 at 05:16 PM.

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