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Thread: Longest Stitch and Glue Boat

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Longest Stitch and Glue Boat

    Quote Originally Posted by BOI View Post
    When you are dealing with plywood, the strength isn't the only factor. The other one is the bendability of the plywood. A longer boat would have gentler curves (not so good for strength but good for bending). Still, you might end up having to laminate the boat from several layers of thinner plywood around the forefoot.

    Do get Devlin's book; there is a graph relating thickness of plywood with size of boat and in his book are a lot of examples of larger boats. However, there is no mention in the graph about the internal frames/bulkheads, which are probably more numerous in a larger boat. In most bigger ply boats, and even some small planing sailing dinghies, there is an internal "waffle box" structure under decks, cabins and/or cockpit soles.
    Thanks BOI, I was also thinking of filling any voids or buoyancy volumes with expanding epoxy foam. This would add strength as well.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Longest Stitch and Glue Boat

    Quote Originally Posted by spirit View Post
    Reuel Parker builds long narrow plywood boats, using stitch and glue methods. For example, his new Seabright 33 sailboat is 35 feet long and 8.5 foot beam.

    For powerboats, a great deal depends upon how much you push them. If you are content to go at 10-15 knots, then engines can be small, and boats can be light.
    Phil Bolger's SNEAKEASY is a stiff boxy 27 x 4-foot boat that moves easily with a 20 HP engine. Nigel Irens has been developing a series of round bilge boats with low displacement relative to their length (WoodenBoat 242, Jan-FEb 2015). His own GRETA is 26 feet on the waterline, and does 11 knots with 13 HP.

    Of course you can build a light, strong 30-36 foot boat with a beam of 7 feet. These may or may not be ideal dimensions for your purposes.
    Do you wish to share with us what you wish to do with your skinny boat?
    Thanks Spirit. My main idea for use of the boat is to have something with plenty of room, even if all that room is in a long line forward to aft, and to have a hull that is relatively light and easily driven by a low HP outboard. Intended areas of use are inshore smooth waters. Fishing, picnics etc.

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