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Thread: Hawaii micro cruiser?

  1. #1
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    Default Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Hi, I live on the island of Oahu and want to build a solid sailing boat to go island hopping. I'm looking for a good sub 16 footer( due to space constraints it can't be bigger) capable of handling the rough seas here. Any suggestions?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Quote Originally Posted by Etng View Post
    Hi, I live on the island of Oahu and want to build a solid sailing boat to go island hopping. I'm looking for a good sub 16 footer( due to space constraints it can't be bigger) capable of handling the rough seas here. Any suggestions?
    Great spot to sail. I would probably choose a Hartley 16 good sailing performance with basic accomodation and load carrying ability. The Hartley is also beamy enough if needed to hike out when crossing the channels between the Islands with the stronger trade winds.
    Harbours such as Lono on Molokai are only a few hours sailing time and once there you are far removed from the hustle and bustle of Honolulu.
    The other aspect of sailing such a small craft would be to have the ability to find secure and calm overnight berthage in a number of the smaller harbours in among the charter boats.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    The Hartley is a great little boat. A more complicated option might be the little snub nosed Scamp.
    Last edited by Phil Y; 03-11-2017 at 05:32 PM.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Thanks for the swift responses, I like the look of the Hartley.(Although I think it's a hair too big for my building space.) And I am a fan of John welsford. I was also looking at the Adelie 14 does anyone have experience with this boat?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Simon and I had the opportunity to sail a John Welsford Navigator in the Bribie Island passage races several years ago.
    This race was in sheltered waters with winds gusting to 20 k the boat performed very well and we managed a first place competing against a mixed fleet of boats Hartley's ,Ness boats and a Fulmar to name a few.

    The Navigator is a rather forgiving easily handled craft that would require a high degree of vigilance and dinghy sailing experience especially while single handing in your home waters. If capsized in the Aleenuihaha channel under those circumstances with 25-30 k winds righting her might be a challenge.

    Since I don't classify myself as a dinghy sailor I would prefer the Hartley with its extra beam and yacht like behaviour sailing the Islands

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Yes the Navigator is an excellent boat, my biggest worries are obviously a capsize. Like Phil suggested SCAMP which is a boat I've looked at. It's size is almost perfect and from my understanding its very difficult to capsize and easy to Wright.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Core Sound 15.
    This series of boats has won the Everglades Challenge, should take care of you.
    http://bandbyachtdesigns.com/cs15/

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    The Kaiwi Channel that separates Ohau from Molokai, the nearest island, roughly 25 miles away. Open the link and click on the image:

    http://paddleathlete.com/2013/kaiwi-...l-at-its-best/

    If I were going to do this solo and without a flotilla of chase boats filming the fun for posterity, I would want a fairly bullet proof sub 16 footer, not just hard to capsize but with ballast and righting arm sufficient to roll us right back up in the event. Of course I'm a bit of a chicken about these things. More adventurous sailors might be content with a lightweight open boat.
    Last edited by JimD; 03-11-2017 at 08:54 PM.
    There is no rational, logical, or physical description of how free will could exist. It therefore makes no sense to praise or condemn anyone on the grounds they are a free willed self that made one choice but could have chosen something else. There is no evidence that such a situation is possible in our Universe. Demonstrate otherwise and I will be thrilled.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    JimD, I agree with you that this whole thing seems a tad bit adventurous in any sub 16 footer but I think it's doable. My plan is to sail from Oahu to Molokai, Molokai to Maui, Maui to the Big Island and if all goes well try Oahu to Kauai (Kauai being the furthest Isalnd approx 100 miles.)

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    pilgrim would be perfect but just too big

    http://www.jwboatdesigns.co.nz/plans/pilgrim/index.htm

    this new 15 ft is worth a lok

    https://www.bedardyachtdesign.com/de...micro-cruiser/

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    I will go out on a limb and suggest a San Francisco Pelican, as a much less involved build than a SCAMP, but it does not have its built in bouyancy and ballast systems, though that is something that could be retrofitted given some thought, should be up to the job seeing one sailed from the US to Hawaii.


  12. #12
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    didi sport 15

    great to have lift keel, perhaps add cuddy

    http://www.dixdesign.com/DS15.htm


  13. #13
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    http://www.selway-fisher.com/PCup16.htm
    LOA 13' 1 1/2" 4.00m
    Beam 6'7 1/2" 2.02m
    Hull Mid Depth 2' 9 1/2" 0.85m
    Draft 1'5"/5'5" 0.43/1.66m
    Sail Area 128 sq.ft 11.9 sq.m
    Approx. Dry Weight 992 lbs 450 kg
    Ballast 300 lbs 135 kg
    Maximum Headroom 4'2" 1.27m
    Hull Shape
    Flat narrow bottom plus 3 planks per side
    Construction Methods Stitch and tape
    Major plywood requirements for hull 16 x 6mm sheets
    6 x 9mm sheets
    Guidance Use Inland, estuary and coastal for 2 adults
    Drawing/Design Package 6 x A1 drawings + 7 x A4 instruction sheets
    her.com/PCup16.htm
    Last edited by JimD; 03-12-2017 at 09:02 AM.
    There is no rational, logical, or physical description of how free will could exist. It therefore makes no sense to praise or condemn anyone on the grounds they are a free willed self that made one choice but could have chosen something else. There is no evidence that such a situation is possible in our Universe. Demonstrate otherwise and I will be thrilled.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Having sailed in Molokai Channel on a Cal 20, I can appreciate the height of those waves rolling through. As long as they are not breaking, they are maybe more scary than dangerous but can still easily flip a small boat caught in the wrong path. I'd want self righting with ballast and flotation at a minimum. Its not difficult to make a 16 footer perfectly safe in these conditions but it might not satisfy other requirements of comfort, speed, aesthetics, etc. If you can go to 17 feet, the B&B CSMK3 will do it and sail well. Many 16 footers could make the short trip if handled with skill and energy but it would never be a laid back go when the trade winds are coming through the channel. A Scamp could likely survive but I have a problem seeing it make headway upwind in the channel.
    Tom L

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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Quote Originally Posted by keyhavenpotterer View Post
    didi sport 15

    great to have lift keel, perhaps add cuddy

    http://www.dixdesign.com/DS15.htm


    perhaps use didi mini mk3 style for ds15 build

    http://www.dixdesign.com/didiminiMk3.htm

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    On a blustery day at Waikiki we were paying customers on one of the catamarans that ply the tourist trade. Once we got beyond the lee protection of Diamond Head the wind was quite stiff, and the waves impressive enough. When it came time to turn around and head back to the beach, the skipper, who presumably had done this hundreds of times before, was probably a little complacent and gibed with the the mainsheet cleated in. It was enough to blow out the mainsail, tearing it almost completely in two along one of the colorful seams, and we had to fire up the outboard with only the jib to sail on. This one, obviously a much much bigger boat than the OP intends to build.

    There is no rational, logical, or physical description of how free will could exist. It therefore makes no sense to praise or condemn anyone on the grounds they are a free willed self that made one choice but could have chosen something else. There is no evidence that such a situation is possible in our Universe. Demonstrate otherwise and I will be thrilled.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    john was happy to produce SNS at two different lengths, http://www.jwboatdesigns.co.nz/plans/sns/index.htm

    perhaps he might consider a shorter version of either pilgrim or his new design long steps. http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ign-cross-post

    a 16' of long steps would be perfect for many of us building in our small garages, and using our 16' dinghy club spaces.

    could also meet demand for a larger scamp

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    I've always been drawn to this 14.5 footer from Paul Fisher

    MORNING TIDE 14 (formerly the Tideway 14)
    The Morning Tide 14 is a modern stitch and tape version of the old heavy displacement pocket cruisers that were popular in the 30’s and 40’s. By using modern construction techniques (using pre shaped ply hull panels, frames and transom) we have brought back to life a type of boat that offers good long distance cruising in a small package. She has 2 full length berths and plenty of stowage space and indeed, could be fitted out with a smaller cabin and larger cockpit to suit your needs. The standard arrangement shows a long ply box keel filled with concrete and scrap iron but she may also be fitted with bilge keels (also shown) or a centreboard. She may also be fitted with internal water ballast making her lighter to trail. All fittings have been kept to a minimum to keep costs low and if you would like to fit her out in a different way (ie. an open layout), we can supply all necessary new frame shapes and details. LOD 14’6’’; Beam 6’1’’; Draft 2’1’’; Weight with 700lbs. of ballast 1900 lbs. NOTE - Details are now shown on the Morning Tide drawings for round bilged strip plank construction and a junk rig - and now see her bigger sister, the Morning Tide 18 in the Pocket Cruisers 16' to 20' section.


    There is no rational, logical, or physical description of how free will could exist. It therefore makes no sense to praise or condemn anyone on the grounds they are a free willed self that made one choice but could have chosen something else. There is no evidence that such a situation is possible in our Universe. Demonstrate otherwise and I will be thrilled.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    rog at sea


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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Quote Originally Posted by Etng View Post
    Hi, I live on the island of Oahu and want to build a solid sailing boat to go island hopping. I'm looking for a good sub 16 footer( due to space constraints it can't be bigger) capable of handling the rough seas here. Any suggestions?

    Did you get in the water when you were very young? Are you an excellent swimmer, waterman, surfer? Where will you typically launch? Will you ever beach sail, or will you typically always sail from some dock or harbor facility? What do you currently sail, or have sailed in the past? Will you sail alone or with a companion? Have you considered Gary Dierking's sailing canoes, as a first build / trial balloon, at least as a starting point, before moving on to the island hopping? So many questions because there's so much wind and water in paradise.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    One elegant little micro cruiser is the "Teak Lady". It is a class of some twenty or more boats that are still of universal appeal. The smart little sailers were seventeen foot five inches in length and were built in Hong Kong by the Ah King slipway prior to WWII. The little pocket cruisers proved to be very popular and one couple even sailed from San Francisco to Hawaii on their honeymoon in one. Plans for building this sweet little sloop are still available by contacting the Teak Lady Society which is located in Toledo Oregon.
    Jay
    https://www.facebook.com/teakladysociety/

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    If I were in your shoes, I'd put together a Micro. A well ballasted, and very secure for her size mini cruiser. And not too complex or expensive to build, either.

    -Dave

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Building space restriction mentioned here, brings design consideration into line with my own needs – after starting out at age 12 by building my first boat in a car sized garage, and now at almost 65, am looking at building to a design governed by the same restriction, some of the suggestions in this thread are obviously interesting.
    The selway fisher ‘PCup’ 13’fter mentioned by Jim D being one of them, although I wouldn’t expect that sail rig to survive a roll-over capsize in the Molokai channel, even if the ballasted drop keel works well enough for recovery through 360 deg. So a sturdy mast that helps to prevent a full inversion is more like a personal requirement. But then I am not in a physical condition to consider other hardcore options that others may, and in which case the warm Hawaian waters make double canoes a possibility.
    Having looked at Pacific sailing canoes for more than 40 years (from before the launch of Hokulea), I would be more than happy to build a plywood Pahi in a garage of less than 6M……there is a Wharram Tiki 21 that has recently made a crossing of the Tasman Sea by a guy with his 9YO daughter, and when they arrived in Australia they lived on board for a while as well.
    Sure,the Tiki 21 is going to be a problem building in a garage that is only good for a 16 fter,but a shunter Pahi design can get around this limitation.
    Thing is, I started building my 30 ft Pahi inside a 6M shipping container and had planned to finish him inside the 30M shed that was being built.
    Now, with the Pahi unfinished and the shed up for sale, I will have to make do with a small garage.
    My health is no longer up to staving off hypothermia in the colder (than Hawaii) local waters, so a dry cabin is preferred,and which is not an impossibility on a small pahi….. if a fabric shelter will be good enough…..Howard Rice and the Southern Cross ‘Scamp’ show some possibilities there –well, if we consider a fabric shelter in Hawaiian waters rather than high latitude conditions of Cape Horn.
    Right now I am off o speak with a boat designer/builder/sailor friend about these above considerations and will post this ramble. Maybe when I get back there will be suggestions in this thread on the ‘perfect micro cruiser.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    The only perfect micro cruiser is one that covers the needs of one persons individuals requirements, but you knew that. Is the lack of a backstay on the Fisher micro your main concern to the rig staying onboard? Given how many dinghy classes have a similar rig and probably capsize on a more regular basis, i would have thought it was good enough, maybe add some dyneema running backstays for tough conditions as an option?
    And to make the point about every need being different within a micro size, i would need an inside steering position to keep out of the icy wind, snow and sleet, as not enough room in a micro to hang up and dry a 3 layer oilskin system, but i suppose a good drysuit is an option. Horses for courses.
    Look forward to seeing what you come up with.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Etng

    wondered if you were closing in on any suggestion?

    from your 16' and rough water opening requirement Welsford Pilgrim must be close. can that extra 5" be coped with.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Quote Originally Posted by Etng View Post
    JimD, I agree with you that this whole thing seems a tad bit adventurous in any sub 16 footer but I think it's doable. My plan is to sail from Oahu to Molokai, Molokai to Maui, Maui to the Big Island and if all goes well try Oahu to Kauai (Kauai being the furthest Isalnd approx 100 miles.)
    While I think those three Islands plus Lanai may be doable depending on the boat and your experience , I would caution you in attempting to sail to the big Island across the Alinuihaha channel.
    .This channel is about 30 miles wide and tends to funnel winds adding 10-15 knots to the normal Trade Winds , while creating some scary waves at the same time.
    Last edited by auscruisertom; 03-13-2017 at 04:52 PM.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    [QUOTE=JimD;5183123]I've always been drawn to this 14.5 footer from Paul Fisher

    MORNING TIDE 14 (formerly the Tideway 14)
    The Morning Tide 14 is a modern stitch and tape version of the old heavy displacement pocket cruisers that were popular in the 30’s and 40’s. By using modern construction techniques (using pre shaped ply hull panels, frames and transom) we have brought back to life a type of boat that offers good long distance cruising in a small package. She has 2 full length berths and plenty of stowage space and indeed, could be fitted out with a smaller cabin and larger cockpit to suit your needs. The standard arrangement shows a long ply box keel filled with concrete and scrap iron but she may also be fitted with bilge keels (also shown) or a centreboard. She may also be fitted with internal water ballast making her lighter to trail. All fittings have been kept to a minimum to keep costs low and if you would like to fit her out in a different way (ie. an open layout), we can supply all necessary new frame shapes and details. LOD 14’6’’; Beam 6’1’’; Draft 2’1’’; Weight with 700lbs. of ballast 1900 lbs. NOTE - Details are now shown on the Morning Tide drawings for round bilged strip plank construction and a junk rig - and now see her bigger sister, the Morning Tide 18 in the Pocket Cruisers 16' to 20' section.


    [/QUOTE

    Oh my god, I absolutely adore this little thing! And man, what a stout little boat at 1900 pounds! In the bottom picture, that man doesn't even list her above her bootstripe being that far off the centerline. Must be a very stable boat, and looks like for it's size, it would be hard to find another boat with more interior volume. Seeing the underwater profile, it looks to have sitting headroom for even the tallest of people.

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Ooops, 3'10" headroom. Oh well. I'm short, so it would work for me.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Quote Originally Posted by Etng View Post
    Thanks for the swift responses, I like the look of the Hartley.(Although I think it's a hair too big for my building space.) And I am a fan of John welsford. I was also looking at the Adelie 14 does anyone have experience with this boat?
    Just curious about your size constraints... I'm building a 20'x 6' trans Atlantic small boat in a 20' x 10' shop... but I have a small yard to use as well, a 50' x 80' plot with a house and two other small outbuildings (I do not have acess to for Boat Building)

    I have my table saw outside under the of white plastic cover seen at the right of the photo, that I can remove while sawing, a portable planer, and a band saw in the 20x10' shop...

    I'm just thinking that if you are truly limited to a 16' boat it may be worth while looking around for a larger building space.



  30. #30
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    Just curious about your size constraints... I'm building a 20'x 6' trans Atlantic small boat in a 20' x 10' shop... but I have a small yard to use as well, a 50' x 80' plot with a house and two other small outbuildings (I do not have acess to for Boat Building)

    I have my table saw outside under the of white plastic cover seen at the right of the photo, that I can remove while sawing, a portable planer, and a band saw in the 20x10' shop...

    I'm just thinking that if you are truly limited to a 16' boat it may be worth while looking around for a larger building space.


    Pretty boat. Large dory? Folkboat?

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Quote Originally Posted by Train View Post
    Ooops, 3'10" headroom. Oh well. I'm short, so it would work for me.
    I believe that's height above the settee so its sitting headroom, which will acommodate a tall person well.
    There is no rational, logical, or physical description of how free will could exist. It therefore makes no sense to praise or condemn anyone on the grounds they are a free willed self that made one choice but could have chosen something else. There is no evidence that such a situation is possible in our Universe. Demonstrate otherwise and I will be thrilled.

  32. #32
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    [QUOTE=Train;5183724]
    Quote Originally Posted by JimD View Post
    I've always been drawn to this 14.5 footer from Paul Fisher

    MORNING TIDE 14 (formerly the Tideway 14)
    The Morning Tide 14 is a modern stitch and tape version of the old heavy displacement pocket cruisers that were popular in the 30’s and 40’s. By using modern construction techniques (using pre shaped ply hull panels, frames and transom) we have brought back to life a type of boat that offers good long distance cruising in a small package. She has 2 full length berths and plenty of stowage space and indeed, could be fitted out with a smaller cabin and larger cockpit to suit your needs. The standard arrangement shows a long ply box keel filled with concrete and scrap iron but she may also be fitted with bilge keels (also shown) or a centreboard. She may also be fitted with internal water ballast making her lighter to trail. All fittings have been kept to a minimum to keep costs low and if you would like to fit her out in a different way (ie. an open layout), we can supply all necessary new frame shapes and details. LOD 14’6’’; Beam 6’1’’; Draft 2’1’’; Weight with 700lbs. of ballast 1900 lbs. NOTE - Details are now shown on the Morning Tide drawings for round bilged strip plank construction and a junk rig - and now see her bigger sister, the Morning Tide 18 in the Pocket Cruisers 16' to 20' section.


    [/QUOTE

    Oh my god, I absolutely adore this little thing! And man, what a stout little boat at 1900 pounds! In the bottom picture, that man doesn't even list her above her bootstripe being that far off the centerline. Must be a very stable boat, and looks like for it's size, it would be hard to find another boat with more interior volume. Seeing the underwater profile, it looks to have sitting headroom for even the tallest of people.
    I've had study plans for it for years although its unlikely I'll ever build it. In cross section through the cabin its almost round and with that much weight on the bottom it should easily right itself provided the hatch is kept closed. The junk rig option would be worth considering, too. I like the plywood version but there's also strip plank.

    Last edited by JimD; 03-13-2017 at 11:50 AM.
    There is no rational, logical, or physical description of how free will could exist. It therefore makes no sense to praise or condemn anyone on the grounds they are a free willed self that made one choice but could have chosen something else. There is no evidence that such a situation is possible in our Universe. Demonstrate otherwise and I will be thrilled.

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    After what Howard Rice just went through down in the Straits of Magellan you could give thought to a SCAMP if only there was a 15' version.
    Gerard>
    Everett, WA

    RESIST. FIGHT THE POWER.

  34. #34
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Having sailed between a couple of the islands, and between Kauai and Honolulu twice, having sailed Honolulu to Maui once, and sat on the beach in Maui and watched that channel for several days, I would say that I'm not keen in doing that trip in something of the size you're talking about. It's certainly possible if you watch your weather very closely and have LOTS of time, so that if you have to wait for two, three, four days, you can do it. I mean, people have SWUM between some of the islands, right? People take beach cats and windsurfers (with a crash boat) on good days. On "big" days, a little home-built plywood budget boat with no backup is asking for disaster.

    Scamp is a lovely boat, but you guys have seriously gone off the deep end. The channels between the islands in Hawaii are not the Everglades, nor are they a lake in Kentucky, nor are they the inland waterway. Scamp would be great fun on the leeward side of the islands. You might even be able to take a scamp across on a "nice" day. On even a halfway boisterous day....no. Just...no.

    Whatever you build, it needs to have an enclosed cabin. There needs to be a mess of rigging holding the stick up, and there needs to be a mess of weight under the boat to keep it upright. Beyond that, honestly in the size you're talking, you're going to have fun building the boat and I would bet $100 that sometime in the first dozen times you take the boat out of the leeward side of any island, you're going to scare yourself so thoroughly that the boat goes on its trailer and never comes off again. However, go to it. Have fun.
    Last edited by Alan H; 03-13-2017 at 02:23 PM.
    CLC Skerry = "Vingilothiel"

  35. #35
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    Default Re: Hawaii micro cruiser?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    Having sailed between a couple of the islands, and between Kauai and Honolulu twice, having sailed Honolulu to Maui once, and sat on the beach in Maui and watched that channel for several days, I would say that I'm not keen in doing that trip in something of the size you're talking about. It's certainly possible if you watch your weather very closely and have LOTS of time, so that if you have to wait for two, three, four days, you can do it.

    Scamp is a lovely boat, but you guys have seriously gone off the deep end. The channels between the islands in Hawaii are not the Everglades, nor are they a lake in Kentucky, nor are they the inland waterway.

    Whatever you build, it needs to have an enclosed cabin. There needs to be a mess of rigging holding the stick up, and there needs to be a mess of weight under the boat to keep it upright. Beyond that, honestly in the size you're talking, you're going to have fun building the boat and I would bet $100 that sometime in the first dozen times you take the boat out of the leeward side of any island, you're going to scare yourself so thoroughly that the boat goes on its trailer and never comes off again. However, go to it. Have fun.
    Good post, and that's why Etng needs to tell us more about himself. If he's a skilled waterman with lot's of experience, or a 35 year old, healthy ex-coast guard rescue swimmer, then there's more chance of success. We don't know if the 16 foot limit applies only to the building situation, or to storage considerations too.

    I suggested one of Gary Dierkings outriggers as a first step / trial balloon for this adventure - day use only. The 8 foot long hull sections of the Wa'apa could be built in the 16 foot space. The final boat could be 16 feet long or even 24 feet long, yet still be built or stored in 16 feet. Plus an easy building experience to see whether building is really that much fun.

    Using such a boat on Oahu could be logistically easy. For example, there's a free black top launch ramp on the south end of Kailua beach, at the entrance to Lani Kai. You wouldn't need the blacktop, but you can drive right down to the water's edge on the sand and drop the hulls off on the beach there. On week days there's ample free parking in the lot just a couple of hundred yards up from there. More parking in front of the beach bathrooms/showers early any day, including weekends. Once assembled and launched, you can reach back and forth for over two miles, inside the reef, in a beatiful bay, and with strong onshore winds. Mess up and you'll be blown ashore in comparative safety. There's even a lifeguard at Kailua Beach Park.

    Feeling more adventurous, you can venture outside the reef and reach back and forth between the Mokes and Mokumanu off Kaneohe, with all the wind and waves you could ever want. You can venture further north or south, all the while evaluating how much boat you need and whether this is your cup of tea.

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