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Thread: Saving Tally Ho

  1. #1
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    Default Saving Tally Ho

    www.yachttallyho.com also www.albertstrange.org Toward the end of January the Albert Strange Association (ASA) was notified that all "deadwood" had to be out of the Port of Brookings, Oregon, yard by February 13. After appeal to the board of commissioners the deadline changed to the end of June. Launched as Betty in 1910 as a cruising boat from which the fishing fleet owner could fish, as Tally Ho she won the 1927 Fastnet race in storm conditions with a new Alden schooner the only other finisher. With the exception of the 1927 Fastnet Race she was a sailing cruiser through the late 1960s when she landed on a Polynesian reef. Rebuilt in the islands, she became a motor fishing boat out of Brookings until abandoned in the 1990s. The ASA has owned her now for 4 years seeking someone with interest and finances to restore her. Now this. As an English yacht with solid heritage and build we think her best chance is to return to the UK. We now have an offer of free storage for 5 years in England at Barton on Humber. Tally Ho!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    A grand boat. Best of luck.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    What ah....DO she look like now?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    "Fortunately, they did “speak” from the decks of the two boats that finished. Alfred Loomis described La Goleta’s race in his book Ocean Racing published in 1936. Lord Stalbridge’s account was published in Yachting Monthly.
    Loomis on the race start: “In the morning the weather god, who has a sardonic humour, piped down the wind at the hour of the start, so that the postponement signal was not hoisted. We got under way in a moderate southwesterly, setting spinnakers for the run to the forts, and substituting them for reaching sails for the leg around the east end of the Wight. Then the wind began to blow.”
    Stalbridge: “We got away with a good start from the line at Cowes under all plain sail and the jib topsail, but Jolie Brise, Nicanor and La Goleta soon passed us on the reach down to No Man’s Fort. It had been a dull, unpropitious morning and raining hard, and the wind was now gradually increasing into a good, stiff blow. We took in the jib topsail and ran close-hauled to Bembridge Ledge Buoy, but after rounding this mark the race resolved itself into a dead beat right away down till clear of the Sevenstone Lightship.” Sevenstones Lightship is past Lands End and 200 miles away, many miles beating into a gale! Only four boats got that far.
    Loomis again: “Off St. Catherines it was blowing right pert. It was said that a sea swept us end to end, but that was before I staggered out. The fleet was scattering. Jolie Brise and Tally Ho were out ahead of us, and so was Nicanor. Saoirse, the ketch-schooner, whose name is Gaelic for freedom, was freely sagging off toward France. O’Brien had sailed her around the world, but he had never sailed her to the famous Rock in a Fastnet race. He never did. For three days he tacked forth and back across the Channel and then he upped his helm and returned to the Solent.
    “For this was no race for semi-square-rigged boats. Nor for small yachts intended for sea-keeping rather than sea-going. Nor yet for yachts whose seams were soft and whose gear was aging. See how the list goes. Maitenes, Altair, Morwenna, Spica, Shira, Nelly, Penboch, Thalassa, and Ilex never reached the Lizard, and all put in to leeward ports.
    Maitenes split her mainsail.
    So did Altair.
    Morwenna shifted a dinghy on deck which injured a man internally.
    Spica’s bilge pump failed.
    Shira couldn’t keep up with her leak.
    Nelly and Pemboch, game little 12-tonners, wore out their game crews.
    Thalassa blew out her headsails.
    Ilex, the hard-driven yawl of the hard-driving Engineers, opened her seams in addition to blowing out her headsails.



  5. #5
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    Cont...

    "So, before the race is three days old, whom have we left in this jolly boating weather? Only Jolie Brise, Nicanor, Content, La Goleta, and Tally Ho. And still the wind god puffs his cheeks and blows down on the labouring fleet.”Stalbridge, after the weathering of St. Catherine’s: “We now made a long leg of it into Christchurch Bay and fetched Poole Fairway by about 6:30 p.m. As the flood was against us, we short-tacked in shore down to Anvil Point and, keeping along the coast, weathered St Alban’s Head about midnight. Here we made a bad mistake as the wind had increased, and we decided to take in one reef in the mainsail, which lost us, of course, a certain amount of time. No sooner had we taken in the reef when the wind inclined to moderate, but as it was midnight we decided to let her run on during the middle watch under a reefed mainsail and a topsail, as we thought that if the wind increased we could easily get the topsail off her.
    “It was now my watch below and, coming on deck at 4 a.m., I was pleased to find that we had weathered Portland Race and Portland Light was well abeam, so we shook out the reef and stood away on a long leg across the West Bay. By eight o’clock we were well across the bay and could make out the Jolie Brise close under the land off Teignmouth, with the Nicanor ahead of us and to windward. Ilex abeam of us and La Goleta on our weather quarter.
    “All that afternoon we beat down under the land to Start Point which we weathered about 6 p.m. and then began a long series of tacks against the wind and tide to the Eddistone Lighthouse. At midnight we were some three miles to the east of the Eddistone and at 4 a.m., when I turned in, we were the same distance to the westward of it.
    “We then made another long leg past Fowey and stood right into the land by Dodman’s Head. The wind by this time had got pretty well round to WNW and was blowing hard with fierce gusts, and we could just make out Jolie Brise some way ahead, nearly down to The Manacles. We tacked down under the land and off St. Anthony’s managed to get ahead of both Nicanor and Ilex; Spica, or at all events what we took to be Spica, and La Goleta were some little way astern. About 11a.m., just as we were approaching The Manacles, we saw a yacht ahead, evidently coming toward us, and as she approached, to our surprise it turned out to be the Jolie Brise. We could not think what had happened, but surmised that the weather was too much for her off the Lizard, and this proved to be correct, as she sailed close to us and when we asked her what it was like she said she had had to heave-to and that it was too bed. Now was our chance, as, knowing from the experiences in a gale in the Bay of Biscay what a wonderful sea-boat the Tally Ho was, and confident in our sails and gear, we thought that by reefing her down and making things ship-shape we might be able to weather the Lizard, and if so would catch the tide and be a tide ahead of any of our competitors who failed to do so.
    “So we hove-to and double-reefed the mainsail, reefed the foresail and set our storm jib. We also got out the canvas covers for the skylights and the hatches and lashed them down securely, and put some more lashings on our dinghy and our spare spars and thus made ourselves as snug and as comfortable and watertight as we possibly could be. During the course of these operations Nicanor came alongside and spoke us and I told them what the Jolie Brise had told us. They apparently decided to run for the shelter of the land. Ilex, on the other hand, sailed past us into the foaming deep and would not wait to reef — a course of action we all greatly admired, but somewhat doubted the possibility of its success. A doubt which was soon afterwards confirmed, and we got a glimpse through the flying spray of Ilex running back under head-sails and mizen only.
    “As we approached the Lizard we began to feel the full force of wind and sea and as we stood further out it was indeed enough to make you think. One big comber hit her and made her shiver throughout, sending a sheet of spray clean over the mainsail, but still she forged ahead and, choosing our time, we came about quite easily. Just after this I saw an extraordinary sight; a big oil tanker was steaming into it and as she lifted we could see her keel from forefoot to well abaft her foremast and then as she dipped, the propeller and practically the whole of her rudder came clear out of the water. This will give you some idea of the size of the sea that was running.
    “We had to make two more tacks to weather the Lizard, but by 4 p.m. we had cleared it and were standing into Mount’s Bay. As we got nearer Penzance we felt the shelter of the land and the sea moderated, but the wind, on the other hand, appeared to increase in force and it worked round to the northwest. In the circumstances and in view of the fact that none of the others, as far as we could see, had rounded the Lizard, nor would be likely to round it that night, and also that we should have a foul tide and a head wind off the Longships, and that it would be folly to attempt to beat out there that night, as in all probability we should most certainly have had to heave-to and with the wind and tide against us would have drifted a long way back, I therefore decided to run into Newlyn Roadsteads and anchor until there was a chance of beating out round the Longships. I gave our sailor-men a night in while the amateurs stood anchor watches in the cabin: which, taken on the whole, was a far more comfortable and probably equally profitable way of spending the night than being hove-to off the Longships.
    “At 6 a.m. the wind moderated a good deal and by 6:30 we were under way again,, but when we got down to the Longships there was still a big sea running. None of the other competitors was in sight and the question which exercised our minds was: could they have possibly passed us in the night or were we still well ahead? All that day we beat out into the Irish Channel, and by 10 p.m. we were about 6 miles north-west of the Sevenstones. The wind had now hauled round to the south-west and for the first time we could lay our course, with a nice sailing breeze and a fine night.”
    “While Tally Ho was rounding the Lizard, anchoring for the night, Nicanor put in to Falmouth and La Goleta hove-to under the land all night. Alf Loomis continued his narrative: “In the morning we carried on. So in the afternoon did Nicanor, Simonds having ridden a bicycle down the headland until he could see for himself how bad it was. But she was now short-handed, and when her gaff broke midway to the Fastnet, discouragement overtook her and she definitely quit the race. That left three.
    “Content, only nineteen tons, gave us the scare of our lives, as, on the evening of the forth day, we lay becalmed off the Runnelstone in a lull between two gales. She was only ten miles astern of us, and we allowed her twenty hours! But because of an error attributed to a faulty compass Content, whose owner was not aboard, made the coast of Ireland to leeward of the Old Head of Kinsale and withdrew at Cobh.
    “So there were two of us — Tally Ho and La Goleta, as evenly matched as two boats of different rig and nationality can be. The cutter, a modified Falmouth quay punt, designed by Albert Strange, measured 44 feet, 3 inches w.l. The schooner’s like measurement was 39 feet. La Goleta’s overall length was 54 feet; Tally Ho’s was 47 feet, 7 inches. The beam of each was 12 feet and the drafts were nearly identical at 7 feet, 4 for the schooner and 7 feet, 6 for the cutter. With 1660 square feet of sail the cutter topped us only 110 feet. The one major difference — and that an eminently fair one under average conditions — was that La Goleta allowed Tally Ho 4 hours, 57 minutes for the course. But if it was anybody’s weather — which I doubt — it was Tally Ho’s."

    https://horizonandpointofview.com/2017/01/

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    What ah....DO she look like now?
    A pile o' rusty fas'nens n' punky timbers! Looking at these grand old yachts with yards of sail I am struck by the sheer magnitude of the restoration work and how the second part of the equation is often disregarded, which is the ongoing maintenance and costs. With the evolution of modern building techniques as well as design, materials etc, the cost of ownership has dropped and the ease of boat handling has increased. These old girls need a lot of coin and manpower to run let alone restore and they need a real reason for someone to pour money into them, we have seen on this board quite a few ambitious projects that have ended in tears or being sold sadly. Not all old boats need to be brought back to life.
    whatever rocks your boat

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    It would be nice if she made it over here to the Humber, she would be a great new neighbour.
    Fortunately it seems the UK and northern Europe is still playing around with wooden boats. Since joining the facebook groups for converted trawlers etc there seems to be a lot of people doing this kind of work, either on their own or with small groups of like minded people. These aren't big money projects, but they're still getting done. Thankfully not everyone just looks at the $$

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul G. View Post
    A pile o' rusty fas'nens n' punky timbers! Looking at these grand old yachts with yards of sail I am struck by the sheer magnitude of the restoration work and how the second part of the equation is often disregarded, which is the ongoing maintenance and costs. With the evolution of modern building techniques as well as design, materials etc, the cost of ownership has dropped and the ease of boat handling has increased. These old girls need a lot of coin and manpower to run let alone restore and they need a real reason for someone to pour money into them, we have seen on this board quite a few ambitious projects that have ended in tears or being sold sadly. Not all old boats need to be brought back to life.
    Well, if two guys can rebuild this

    and get her sailing . . .
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Well, if two guys can rebuild this

    and get her sailing . . .
    Wow really? Tell us more....

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    A great effort but there must be more to the story!
    whatever rocks your boat

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    Tally Ho is not in near so bad of shape. She is teak planked, and they are most all fine if I remember right. Some new frames are likely needed, and I think the deck is shot. But she's copper fastened teak, it doesn't get much more long lived than that.







  12. #12
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    I saw the boat in 2010. She does not appear to be in terribly bad shape. I don't think I went aboard...there were people working on her for years...the kingpin died a few years ago. I could not make a judgment on how she looks inside or on the quality of the work performed. The location is isolated and it is possible that the work was not of the highest quality. But it would be a shame to see her go.
    http://www.sandemanyachtcompany.co.u...acht-for-sale/

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    So she's advertised for £25000.00 That's a lot of money for a ticket to take on a big restoration project. She needs to be given away to someone who is willing and able to do the work. She's only 47 feet. Not beyond reality. Huge sail area, looks great.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    Similar story with Irene of Bridgwater, she was burnt to the water line in the Carribean and sank. They managed to refloat what was left, put sheets of ply around the remaining frames and a suitably mad man offered to tow her back to the UK, where she was rebuilt using lots of volunteer labour.

    Tally-Ho looks pretty straightforward by comparison. The 25k price tag is a bit optimistic, but you have to start somewhere.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Well, if two guys can rebuild this

    and get her sailing . . .

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Wow really? Tell us more....
    http://pioneerck18.org/page5/page6/index.html
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  16. #16
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    I remember LN196 "VICTORIOUS", which I believe may be still sailing around King's Lynne? From a mud-filled carcass to a pretty lugger and only costing three fingers.

    http://www.victorious.co.uk/victorious/
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  17. #17
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    We need more donations to make it happen. Little by little.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho


  19. #19
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    He is doing it. She's on a trailer now and might be on the road north.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    Quite a task. At least she had enough strength to be put on a trailer.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    She is in a field in Sequim.
    Leo is probably as capable and energetic as needed.
    Last edited by wizbang 13; 06-22-2017 at 08:59 AM.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho


  23. #23
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    She's not really in the field, Bruce, she's beyond the field and and next to a boat/wood shop. I think you are correct about Leo. He's building the cover now.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    I'm very glad the boat has found a home. I wish him great success.

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  26. #26
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    It is a beautiful boat, with a rather miraculous provenance. I'm pleased to see her in ambitious, capable hands and certain that when sailing again she will be remarkable. The story of that Fastnet win in heavy weather against larger vessels is a remarkable tale. The fact that this boat has been continuously at sea including a long stint working in the North Pacific for the better part of a century is quite a statement.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Saving Tally Ho

    Looks like she sold for the right price and is in good hands. Yay!

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