Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 36 to 50 of 50

Thread: Old or new table saw?

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    62,235

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    I bought one of these, the same model. Old British iron, the Rolls Royce version.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Wadkin-Bursg...wAAOSwx6pYsg2c

    There are 2 saws for sale, keep the best one and sell the other.



    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  2. #37
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    439

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    I've got a Powermatic 66 in the shop, which is a great saw. Stock fence is very good, but some folks go even higher-end. For portable use, I have a Ryobi BT3000, which is an aluminum sliding table saw. Fence is OK if you take care of it, and lousy if you don't. Uses thin-kerf blades, and isn't quite the powerhouse that the Powermatic is. But it's pretty versatile, and also has a router table that uses the same fence, and slider if you want. I have it mounted on the old-style Rigid stand, which is a good cross between portability and stability. (I bought a whole dead saw on CL to get that stand, as it wasn't sold separately.) However, it's still pretty heavy to lift up to the deck of a boat -- unless you actually meant the deck out back of a house. The newest DeWalt non-battery table saw looks nice for a liftable saw, and the fence looks pretty reasonable too.

    Listen to the folks who recommend bandsaws -- they are the cat's meow, and the bonus is they're usually pretty quiet in comparison to a table saw, so your apartment basement shop may be back in the game. In my case, the collective noun for my group of bandsaws is "an embarrassment" of bandsaws -- I've got a few. Yet to be commissioned is one I think will be good for wood boat maintenance -- it's a Craftsman tilting bandsaw, where the work table stays flat, and the pulley/motor unit tilts. Looks good in theory -- we'll see about practice. I need it to be semi-portable, so a little challenge there.

    I don't think the approach of a circular saw mounted beneath an accessory table is the way to go. I know Hirsch made one years ago that was pretty bad, and the few modern alternatives are likely as expensive as the real thing.

    Chip

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Cape Fear, NC, USA
    Posts
    2,710

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    Bosch contractor saw: I have had mine for nearly 10 years and about 5 years ago I replaced and motor shaft bearing (ereplacementparts dot com) and it still goes. I find the table that expands to support a sheet of ply a wonder. the outfeed support bar is very helpful, the fence and miter gauge have easy storage and there is a handy extra blade storage box built in. The new ones have a super handy collapsing wheeled base that looks like one person can move it on a whim and I would love dearly to have that , my separate collapsing base with no wheels is just a tiny project if/when I move the was to a new site. I would buy another Bosch in a heartbeat. A friend had company that built marinas/docks some years ago and that is what he used. My one homemade addition is a 6ft ply & 2"x2"spruce straightedge fence length extender that clamps to the stock fence to help me stay in alignment when ripping extra super very long pieces by giving my eye more to line_up/keep_parallel.
    Last edited by George Ray; 03-10-2017 at 09:22 AM.
    This is the first lesson ye should learn: There is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, it doesn't behoove any of us to speak evil of the rest of us.
    E. Cayce

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,236

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    Peter, that Wadkin Bursgreen saw is just great. The Gardner of table saws! But it would cost me more than the purchase price to move two of them from the midwest to here in the upper left corner of the country. And then I'd need to rewire my house... Beautiful machine but not for me.

    And thanks Chip. The votes for a bandsaw are making me think about that option. You're right, the lower noise would make it more suitable to the shop space I have. And I will need one at some point. There's an old Rockwell bandsaw on Craigslist right now for $120.00... might have to go take a look.
    - Chris

    https://fvpetrel.wordpress.com

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    40,345

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    The Rockwell 14" bandsaw is a good choice. Solid. Reliable. Lots sold, so lots of used machines. Several models were offered, and some of them have pretty puny motors... but unless you're doing resawing, or other thick cuts on dense hardwood, that shouldn't be a problem. With a fresh blade, that is. They dull quickly. And, really, the answer to the tablesaw/bandsaw debate is BOTH. For us - the best setup has been a bigger bandsaw, with a wider blade, for resaw and other straight cuts... and a Rockwell 14" with a skinny blade, for curvy cuts. Throw in a decent cabinet saw, and you're in business. For a home shop, something like a Rockwell (or Jet, or Powermatic) 14" saw, with a stout motor and a riser kit, is probably the most practical and versatile.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    5,108

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    With the boat work I have been doing the last couple of years I can't imagine not having both a table saw and a bandsaw.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    seattle
    Posts
    11,532

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    When looking at bandsaws, don't ignore Grizzly.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Los Gatos, CA
    Posts
    300

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    I have that exact Rockwell saw. I paid $50 for it. It has plenty of power. I have cut up to 1/2 inch Aluminum with it and the motor just changes pitch a tiny bit, maybe down 50 rpms at most.

    What I don't like about the saw is the fence. The operator's side is plenty robust, but the far end is a janky u strap and it hangs up the fence to the tune of 1/16 of an inch front to rear.

    I get the feeling from many fellow non boat woodworkers that the first thing done to 90% of cabinet saws is to get a new fence. Not sure why that is. Many of the stock cabinet saws fences that I see immediately replaced look fine.
    Last edited by leop; 03-11-2017 at 05:36 PM.

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    62,235

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Peter, that Wadkin Bursgreen saw is just great. The Gardner of table saws! But it would cost me more than the purchase price to move two of them from the midwest to here in the upper left corner of the country. And then I'd need to rewire my house... Beautiful machine but not for me.

    And thanks Chip. The votes for a bandsaw are making me think about that option. You're right, the lower noise would make it more suitable to the shop space I have. And I will need one at some point. There's an old Rockwell bandsaw on Craigslist right now for $120.00... might have to go take a look.
    Hi Chris I bought my Wadkin from 1500 miles away , the freight was $170 from the vendor to home. Perhaps freight is cheaper in Australia. Ask your local trucker for a quote ! I also pulled the 5 hp 3 phase motor off and fitted a 1.5 hp 240v single phase..... which I had. It's sufficient though the 5 hp would have been great. All it took was reboring the drive pulley otherwise the change was simple..
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA USA
    Posts
    9,426

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerarddm View Post
    The Bosch folding cart contractor's saw is universally loved, and should be gettable on Craig's List for $400-$500. I built my boat with one.

    +10. Great saw. For what it is, it's great. It's no cabinet saw, but it's nearly as accurate. And being able to fold it up and put it away rocks. Especially with a small shop
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    San Francisco Bay
    Posts
    11,249

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    Have to disagree with the bolded bit. Of course, people develop work patterns that suit them, based upon what they've been introduced to early on. And for boat work, there are plenty of people that would choose a bandsaw first, over a tablesaw. But there are plenty, also, that would choose a tablesaw first. I among them. Which only goes to prove my second sentence.

    My reasoning is this - a good jigsaw is a pretty decent substitute for what I mostly use a bandsaw for - except for re-sawing tall stock (which is rare). There is no 'pretty decent' substitute for how I use a tablesaw. Oh... there ARE substitutes. But they don't fill in for a table saw nearly as well as the jigsaw does for a bandsaw.

    Certainly one can argue either way... and we have, ad nauseum. But what can't be argued is that the bolded comment is pure cowflop. Not just exaggeration, but nonsense.
    I should have been more clear: There's really very little that needs to be done on board a boat that needs to be done on a table saw.

    When working on a boat, I really don't see much need for a table saw aboard. You can do lots of stuff on a table saw, but doing it on a boat is rather unwieldy. I've been around a lot of professional yards over the years and I've seen band saws brought aboard, generally before the decks are closed up, but I can't remember every seeing a professional boat builder with a table saw on board. Your mileage varies, perhaps.

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    40,345

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Cleek View Post
    I should have been more clear: There's really very little that needs to be done on board a boat that needs to be done on a table saw.

    When working on a boat, I really don't see much need for a table saw aboard. You can do lots of stuff on a table saw, but doing it on a boat is rather unwieldy. I've been around a lot of professional yards over the years and I've seen band saws brought aboard, generally before the decks are closed up, but I can't remember every seeing a professional boat builder with a table saw on board. Your mileage varies, perhaps.
    Agreed. When I have to go aboard, and think I'll need one, I take a tiny little vintage Craftsman bench saw, with sheet-metal top, but a decent fence. It's a one-hand carry, and it's got an ultra-thin-kerf blade on it. Otherwise - it's handsaw, circular saw, or jigsaw. Or fabricate things in the shop which get installed... or cut to fit... on the boat.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    11,204

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    My dad built his 23 foot carvel boat back in 1974, mostly Jarrah which is extremely hard, with pretty much no power tools except a hand drill. Planks were sawed using a hand saw, and finished with a hand plane. Even the big stuff, back bone etc, were done by hand. Mast and spars are solid Oregon pine, eight and sixteen sided with a hand saw, then rounded with a hand plane, nothing flash, just a number 4 Stanley handyman. Not saying that's how I'd do it, I love power tools and will go a long way to find a good short cut. But if you really want to finish this boat, just get on with it.

  14. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Winthrop, WA
    Posts
    253

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    I've built boats and cabinets and a million other things with that exact Rockwell saw. I now haul it around to job sites when we're going to be there a while. It won't have the oomph that a portable will have, unless you swap out the motor, but it will produce vibration free cuts for a long time.

  15. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,236

    Default Re: Old or new table saw?

    Thanks again everyone. A table saw is in my future but probably not as soon as I was thinking. I just don't have a good place to set one up off of the boat, and the comments about using one aboard from Bob and David have convinced me that's not the best plan. So rather than compromising to get a tool that won't be the right long-term solution I'm going to keep using friends' table saws when I really need one, and focus on building my tool collection other areas in the meantime.
    - Chris

    https://fvpetrel.wordpress.com

    Life is short. Go boating now!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •