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Thread: Starting a faering

  1. #1
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    Default Starting a faering

    I had planned to build my cruising shantyboat design next but have opted instead, for now anyway, to go and spend the summer with some wolves I know, Maybe I should say "know of", they probably know more about me than I of them. I can't even tell one from the other (yet!).

    Anyway, I'll need a project to keep busy. Even though there will be the wolves, and fishing, hiking and reading mysteries there will be plenty of time to kill. It may turn out that I just make a couple pairs of longer (8'6" and 9') oars from driftwood at my campsite for the rowing/pedalling/trolling motoring boat that I already have, which I may bring along, but if I can get this ready to dismantle then reassemble and finish on the beach I'll bring it instead. I'll have to have the aluminum boat anyway, and 3 boats would be just too much hauling. We'll see.

    The faering is 20 feet long by 49" wide by 16"+ deep midships. That's a bit long and narrow, not for one rower in a howling storm by any means, but it should be very nice for one or two persons to row on nice days. It will be fast, for sure, but it may need some sandbags down low midships for single handed rowing.

    I'm inspired by FloMo's design, for one.

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...g-Design-Study




    But more inspired by this one by Paul Schweiss;



    There's not a whole lot of difference.

    Not having any plans I've just lofted then laminated up one midships frame, two identical frames to be spaced 3" from midships and two identical stems.

    I'm thinking that since the planks/fairing battens only pass through 3 points (mid, frame #1 and the stem) they will have to describe a faired line. Additional frames can be bent or sawn or laminated to fill the space between the laminated frames and the stems if I see the need. I expect to add just one, same as the original faerings, although perhaps not canted. We'll see what works when I get there.

    Even though I'm just short of 70 I have kept 3 part time jobs. It helps to feel that I owe it to someone to get out of bed reasonably early and keeps me on my toes to a certain extent, but things are slow right now so this is what I've been able to do over the last couple of weeks.







    The frames and stems are laminated from AYC with TIII. The keel, which is straight, will be AYC, the planking CVG WRC. I haven't made up my mind whether to just strip build the whole thing or strip build the garboard and the sheer separately and apply the sheer as a clinker plank. I think that will look better.

    There will be 3 probably removable thwarts. That's why the frames are as heavy as they are, no transverse support from the thwarts.

    I'm thinking single thole pins instead of locks, just because it will look more fitting, although I know this hull will be anything but truly authentic. Hey, it's just for fun! I may even donate it to a non-profit in the end, but not until I've rowed it around the block a couple of times.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Subscribed. Looking forward to this.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Interesting. Why no beams under the thwarts? Norwegian and Shetland boats have a beam across the frames under the thwarts on the midships and forward frames.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  4. #4
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Neither of these designs look to be very stable . I would not pick one to build for that reason. There are much better designs about Like the UK Tideway dinghies.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Dodger View Post
    Neither of these designs look to be very stable . I would not pick one to build for that reason. There are much better designs about Like the UK Tideway dinghies.
    I don't know. My Afjordsfaering which you can see in the background of the photo in #1 lets me sit on the gunwale. It does roll down a bit, then firms up. Mine is a 20 footer with an extra half room amidships. Boat rows ok for one but you really need two at that size.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Vernon Langille, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity and a quiver of unamed 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Dodger View Post
    Neither of these designs look to be very stable . I would not pick one to build for that reason. There are much better designs about Like the UK Tideway dinghies.
    She has just slightly more slender beam as the Gokstad faering

    Quote Originally Posted by flo-mo View Post
    This is one of my all time favorit wooden boat designs: The Gokstad Faering (21'4" x 4'6")









    Three links for more information:

    http://home.online.no/~joeolavl/viking/gokstadfaering.htm

    http://www.vikingeskibsmuseet.dk/en/...-from-gokstad/

    http://eesti-viikingid.ee/ehitatud-l...viikingipaadid
    Absolutely bomb proof provenance.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  7. #7
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Interesting. Why no beams under the thwarts? Norwegian and Shetland boats have a beam across the frames under the thwarts on the midships and forward frames.
    Hi Nick,

    I've noticed that once those boats were planked the frames were often added in pieces, with scarf joints. Since mine are one piece and quite substantial I don't anticipate needing any fixed transverse members.

    Also, besides the outer rail I may add an inner rail on the inner edge of the frames to stiffen the sheer, another reason to not think it needs them.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Dodger View Post
    Neither of these designs look to be very stable . I would not pick one to build for that reason. There are much better designs about Like the UK Tideway dinghies.
    Better in some ways Roger, but not what I want or need. For one thing it's not meant to sail, at least not upwind, so doesn't need the beam. It's meant to be a slick rowing hull. This hull will row circles around the Tideway. Well, maybe not small circles, that long keel will make it a bit hard to turn.

    Also I've admired this hull form for a long time and it's a good time for me to go ahead and give it a try.

    What I really admire are the folks who build them traditionally. That takes some real and specialized talent, time and patience, none of which I want to employ at this point.
    Last edited by Gib Etheridge; 02-13-2017 at 11:26 AM.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Fuller View Post
    I don't know. My Afjordsfaering which you can see in the background of the photo in #1 lets me sit on the gunwale. It does roll down a bit, then firms up. Mine is a 20 footer with an extra half room amidships. Boat rows ok for one but you really need two at that size.
    What do you mean by an "extra half room amidships" Ben?

    I don't much like rowing two-up. It seems I never get a rowing partner who rows at the same cadence or stroke length as me, and I like to be able to row as erratically as I please without banging oars with the other guy. They also catch a lot of crabs and I wind up wet.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Looks cool. I'm very interested in what you will be doing on the trip, and your friends the wolves.

    Kenny

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Quote Originally Posted by minuteman View Post
    Looks cool. I'm very interested in what you will be doing on the trip, and your friends the wolves.

    Kenny
    I've wanted to do this since I was 12, so for the last 58 years, almost got to do it last summer but just couldn't graciously get away from one of my part time jobs in time. Looks a lot more likely this time, and I get the feeling that it's getting pretty close to now or never.

    Since I won't be feeding them I doubt that we'll get to be friends, just acquaintances.

    I'll take lots of photos, maybe some vids, and keep a bit of a journal. I'll share them here if I can pull this off, which I'd better do or I'll feel like a fool. I learned long ago that it's better to relate what I have done rather than what I intend to do, but I share my plans anyway. Some folks never learn. Sharing dreams is fun in itself though, and a lot of the fun is in the anticipation.
    Last edited by Gib Etheridge; 02-13-2017 at 11:38 AM.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    Hi Nick,

    I've noticed that once those boats were planked the frames were often added in pieces, with scarf joints. Since mine are one piece and quite substantial I don't anticipate needing any fixed transverse members.
    That might work, although Norwegian boats were and are framed in one from just below the shear strake across to the other side. The beam and standing knees then sit on top of the frame heads.

    Also, besides the outer rail I may add an inner rail on the inner edge of the frames to stiffen the sheer, another reason to not think it needs them.
    Again both Shetland and Norwegian boats are made to flex, you can shake one stem head and watch the other stem wiggle in sympathy but out of phase. Flexibility is good in waves.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  13. #13
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    What do you mean by an "extra half room amidships" Ben?

    I don't much like rowing two-up. It seems I never get a rowing partner who rows at the same cadence or stroke length as me, and I like to be able to row as erratically as I please without banging oars with the other guy. They also catch a lot of crabs and I wind up wet.
    Frame spacing is about 3 foot. Some Shetland boats and Ben's Afjordsfaering have an extra frame at 18" to two foot space between the rowing thwart frames. One Shetland builder put them in to strengthen a weakness that he perceived in a hard worked boat.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  14. #14
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Dodger View Post
    Neither of these designs look to be very stable . I would not pick one to build for that reason. There are much better designs about Like the UK Tideway dinghies.
    I can't judge the design started here, but I wouldn't question the seaworthiness of a færing. You are going to have to look hard to find anything that can match its history as a capable, fast, traditional workboat.... designed for working the coastal waters of the north sea. .

    I've seen the Gokstad færing copy in use at the viking centre in Lofoten and talked with guys who row & sail it. It is less stable than our 'modern' færing, but still a capable boat.

    As Nick pointed out, making the hull strong but also flexible is part of the magic. Even on a boat of this size, boats built in this tradition DO twist symetrically, but to the opposite side when you grab it by the stem and give it a shake. Light, flexible and springy. And carry on forever with a pull of the oars. Easy boats to fall in love with, if you ask me.
    Last edited by lagspiller; 02-22-2017 at 05:15 PM.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Gib,

    This looks like a great project, in an even better working space.
    Have fun.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    What do you mean by an "extra half room amidships" Ben?

    I don't much like rowing two-up. It seems I never get a rowing partner who rows at the same cadence or stroke length as me, and I like to be able to row as erratically as I please without banging oars with the other guy. They also catch a lot of crabs and I wind up wet.
    I can't remember the proper Norse term, but what you get is an extra 18 inches or so to a standard faering taking it out to 19-20 feet. Gives you plenty of room for rowing two up, but adds some wetted surface which you will feel. If you mostly row solo, you are better off with the standard 16-17 length. Where as the conventional faerings are 3 frame, 3 thwart boats, mine has four frames, with the extra half room amidships which is where the mast is stepped for the square.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Vernon Langille, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity and a quiver of unamed 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Gib, I have been 'planning' to build a faering almost as long as you have, but am far less likely to get the job done. Looking forward to the build.

    A room is a rom, according to http://www.vikingskip.com/norse_faering.htm It is the space between the thwarts.

    Good informational thread that also defines rooms http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...-faerings-quot
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Just read Varanger's post re: real honest to goodness faerings. If I could change the title of this I would put quotes around "faering". Just going to leave it though. I've eaten a bit of humble pie before, it didn't do me any harm.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    It's been about 2 1/2 weeks since the OP. There's been some progress.

    First I flattened the tops (bottoms) of the frames for the keel and drilled the limbers. I've posted this method before, a year or two ago. I like it because the holes come out nice and clean with next to no effort. Because they expose end grain where it will be difficult to seal them later I applied epoxy until the end grain wouldn't soak up any more then bedded the keel in thickened epoxy, clamped it in place and cleaned off the squeezeout.





    I know it looks off center, but I swear it's not. Camera angle I guess.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Next came the long and tedious process of beveling the keel, stems and frames.

    Actually, I did most of the keel on the bench.

    I laid it on top of the frames, marked the underside to widths at each frame, connected the dots with a faering () batten, sawed to shape then planed in the bevel.

    Because it's nice not to have a lip at the edge of the keel where dirt, sand and fish blood accumulate I decided to make the edges come right to a knife edge. It might be a bit of a challenge to suck them up tight when glueing on that big wide garboard, but I have found that there's always a way. Maybe I'll just screw or bolt right thru then remove the fasteners after the epoxy cures and fill the holes. We''ll see when I get there. In the meantime I'll need to be careful not to damage them to much.

    The battens show where the sheer plank will lie. I added 1 1/2" to the beam and 3/4" to the freeboard at the sheer midships. Although it was faer (thaer I go again) it didn't look quite right. I'm not surprised that it wasn't right on the first try since I'm just going from a photo and didn't loft.



    If you look back towards the rear wall of the shop you can see the chief Viking's throne up on it's podium, and you can see the chief's adoring fan club to the left and right of the throne.
    Last edited by Gib Etheridge; 03-02-2017 at 08:24 PM.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    And here's the view from the throne.


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    When most of us think of Vikings we think of their boats, but I think most folks picture a hairy dude with a battle axe and a shield, often with a helmet adorned with horns.



    That's a selfie, by the way.

    And here's my wife.



    Anyway, notice how the frame at 3' from the center, when inverted, makes for a great set of horns for a Viking helmet.

    Last edited by Gib Etheridge; 03-03-2017 at 01:14 AM.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Gib,
    I love the shop and looking forward to seeing more of the boat, but I can't abide the helmet. As Gimlet said in 'Bored of the Rings', of a horned helmet with a spike, "The jerk looks like a fork," whispered Gimlet. I don't think that any Viking ever did or would wear a helmet with such a foolhardy excrescence. The horns would be an easy target and would jerk the fool's neck when you caught one with a halberd.

    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    When most of us think of Vikings we think of their boats, but I think most folks picture a hairy dude with a battle axe and a shield, often with a helmet adorned with horns.



    That's a selfie, by the way.
    P.S.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Any updates?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    And here's the view from the throne.


  25. #25
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Cool boat! I'm looking forward to seeing it come together.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    No progress on the "faering" since the last post. I have been so busy tying up loose ends so that I can get away for the whole summer that I've come to realize that I was trying to do more than there was time to do. I'm very close to leaving though, and a bit earlier than I had expected. That's good in itself since I'll be able to observe the pups right from the time they leave their den and start hanging out at their "rendezvous" site on the beach. That is, assuming that they still den up there. The pack moves from time to time. The island is small and food is in short supply.

    I will finish building it when I get back though, and there will be lots of pics.

    I appreciate the interest.

    I think I will need to be born again in order to do all of the things I want to do.

    Anyway, I will have a boat to play around in on the nice days when I'm not otherwise occupied. I'll be rowing, among other things, in one of the nicest places I've ever been.

    A nice spot on the island...



    I was camping/fishing there once during a storm with winds gusting to hurricane force. Huge waves were rolling in and over these rocks. Those trees are a lot further away than they look in the photo, and higher than they look too, or they'd have been washed away. The wind was so strong that I had to hold on to the kids to keep them upright, and it was raining. The drops were traveling so fast that they hurt our faces. We didn't fish that day.



    Southwest. Australia is down there somewhere.





    Son in law. The fishing is usually good there. Low tide.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Aw heck, just one more. I'll have a much better camera this year, a Nikon D300S with a tripod. No more lousy pics because my hands were shaking too much.

    Wolf. No zoom.


  28. #28
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Nice shop! Interesting build. Subscribing.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Starting a faering

    Gib, Two books appropriate to your trip, if you haven't already read them, are "Never Cry Wolf" and "The Boat Who Wouldn't Float," both by the late Farley Mowat. Education, entertainment and humor for quiet evenings.

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