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Thread: Campion Apple

  1. #1

    Default Campion Apple

    After a fair amount of consternation and generally overthinking things, I've finally started building the Campion Apple 16 (discussed in design forum here http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...mpion-Apple-16). It's a 5 chine stitch and glue yawl rig that appears to be fairly straight forward to build (I've built several dinghys, but nothing this size).

    I'm starting with the spars because temperatures can be a bit dicey for epoxy work in New Hampshire this time of year, and although I have a nicely insulated shop, I need to get 3 1500 watt space heaters to keep it at a good temperature when it gets really cold. I figure with the spars, I can always tent them to get the temps I need and I expect they will be good practice for things to come. So far I just finished the birdsmouth glue up of main mast and I'm pretty happy with how it's turning out so far. All the glue lines look pretty tight and it's straight (I'm pretty sure that is a good thing). I won't bore anyone with details since it's been documented a bunch of times in the forum, but it's a standard 8 sided birdsmouth spar with the top 1.5 meters tapered (last 300mm has largest taper). The only somewhat different approach I took was to glue it up in 2 sections so I could fit the top and bottom plugs. If you're interested, I wrote up all the gory details at www.fernhollow.net

    Hopefully I'll start turning it into a circle tomorrow.

    Here's a link to some photos, not sure why I couldn't embed them on the page: https://goo.gl/photos/qaopJy8d7RN8APeA7

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Campion Apple

    Good work so far. You obviously know a thing or two about building spars.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Campion Apple

    Perfect I also have plans for this boat, are you going with the light air rig, as fickle as morning wind can be here it seems like a way to go.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Campion Apple

    Quote Originally Posted by capefox View Post
    Good work so far. You obviously know a thing or two about building spars.
    Thanks for the kind words, but it's my first spar. Reading many of the threads on this forum helped me find my way. To be fair though, I've pretty much spent my whole life playing with bits of wood. I hope everything else continues to go well, but I'm bound to make some expensive mistakes along the way and will have to re-do something.

    Here's a photo of the start of getting the thing round today. I knocked off the edges with a power plane to make 16 sides, then 32 with a jack plane, then I went to 80 grit paper. I think I should have tried for 64 before I went to the sandpaper, but I think it will end up fine, but more dusty work than anticipated.


  5. #5

    Default Re: Campion Apple

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Smith porter maine View Post
    Perfect I also have plans for this boat, are you going with the light air rig, as fickle as morning wind can be here it seems like a way to go.
    Excellent, are you planning on building soon? I'd like to find a few more builders of this design; I've been corresponding with another forum member who built his in 2007, but it would be great to find others who are mid build.

    I plan to go with the standard rig, as I will be spending at least part of the time down and around Cape Cod and the islands where the wind can really pipe up... With that said, I am looking forward to using this for the Maine island trail. Where are you in Maine?

    -matt

  6. #6

    Default Re: Campion Apple

    Probably next fall, not being a wood worker I have started making the pieces for a Bolger cartopper for some practice. I am 40 miles west of Portland on the New Hampshire line, Freedom New Hampshire is 3 miles west of me.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Campion Apple

    The Cartopper should be a fun project, I considered doing one a few years back but settled for a smaller dinghy (D4) for my A35. I'm about 1.5 hours South West of you in Canterbury NH. I used to spend a fair amount of time up in your area on Ossippee Lake and in Madison.

    Last night I didn't have much time, but spent about 30 minutes doing some more sanding and shaping the top of the spar. I'm approaching round but there are still a few high spots (mostly along glue lines) that I need to take care of and then have a lot of finish sanding. I've seen some elaborate lathes and belt sander jigs to get a nice round profile, but I'm not sure I want to invest that much time for a few pieces. I think If I was building a lot of spars it might make sense, but I may try gluing some sandpaper to the inside of half of a pvc pipe for final shaping. I think I have seen some others do this as well. Any other simple methods that people have tried with good results?

    The top plug in the picture is a nice piece of mahogany that served as a cockpit support beam on my former Alberg 35. I found it when I was rebuilding the cockpit sole and couldn't bring myself to throw it in the trash. I'm glad I didn't, it was a lovely piece with such tight uniform grain that is was a pleasure to shape with the plane and should serve as a nice accent on the spar even though it won't be visible when the mast is up.



  8. #8

    Default Re: Campion Apple

    I did a bunch more sanding last night and I'm pretty close to the final dimensions for the bottom and top (tapers from 90mm diameter to 50mm starting 1500mm from the top). I'm actually about 93mm and 53mm respectively, so I have some more work to do, but I decided to weigh it and it came in at 25 pounds (15 foot spar). Doesn't that seem heavy for a birdsmouth spar? I realize I'm using Douglas Fir which weighs more than Sitka, but I couldn't justify paying 3 times the cost. I'm also following the designer's recommendation to have the bottom meter solid, but I've been reading some of the other birdsmouth threads with people coming in at ~15 pounds for equal or longer spars and I'm wondering where I went wrong or should I just live with it?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    northwestern Wisconsin
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    Default Re: Campion Apple

    Fir can be pretty heavy stuff, and that's a fairly tall mast. I suppose the most important consideration is this: do you feel like your spar is light enough that you can handle it easily by yourself? If so, then no worries.

    I've always gone with solid masts for simplicity. I kind of think birdsmouth makes the most sense when you go all-out to try and make it as light as possible, which isn't going to happen with Douglas-fir. But there's nothing horribly wrong with using a heavier-than-optimal birdsmouth spar. If it bugs you later on, you can always replace it with a lighter spar if you still think it's necessary after getting a few hours of sailing in.

    Other may have varying opinions, of course.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Campion Apple

    Thanks Tom,
    I'm not worried about being able to wrestle it into place, I'm a big monkey at 6'5" and 250 lbs and have frequently stepped lightning masts which are 26' and minimum 35lbs (per class rules). I was more worried about performance considerations. I will probably ask the designer what his take on it is as well, but I thought I'd ask here since there have been so many that have built birdsmouth masts and the weights seem so low compared to mine.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Campion Apple

    It's been a busy month and I haven't been able to spend as much time as I'd like on the build, but I managed to come to terms with the weight and got the final mast spar down to 23 pounds so I'm reasonably happy with that. I also built up a birdsmouth mizzen mast and main boom along the way and I'm still debating whether I need to do the main yard in birdsmouth or will the weight savings aloft be negligible? I still need to do the boomkin in birdsmouth fashion, but I'm feeling that it's time to move on to the hull. With that said, I bought six sheets of 6mm Okume Marine Ply this past weekend and got started on scarphing (scarfing?) them together.

    I made a circular saw jig with some melamine shelving and 2x4 blocking similar to something I found online. It has an 82degree angle on the face which gives me roughtly the 8:1 ratio that was recommended. I mounted it to my manning bench and tried out a few test pieces. Everything went well and so I went to town on the real plywood. It was perfect except for one corner on the first piece that curled up a bit and caused more of a cut than I wanted, but it was easily cleaned up with a sander.




    Once I had all six sheets cut and cleaned up with a sander, cleared out a space on the floor, laid some plastic sheeting down, and test fit the first two sheets. Then I mixed up a small batch of epoxy with some 404 thickener (runny ketchup consistency) and spread it on both joints before covering with plastic and 'clamping' in place with a 2x6 and a heavy toolbox. The next day I pulled it apart and cleaned up the squeeze out and started on the next set of two sheets. I laid them right on top of the first set and it gave a good alignment guide and provided cold protection from the cement floor. The first scarph took longer than I had hoped to cure, and I'm pretty sure it was because even though I had heat on it, the side facing the cement was probably pretty cold. Anyway, all seems well at this point and I hope to have the third (and final) sheets glued up and cured by tomorrow afternoon.

    Then I can actually start laying out the panel lines. I expect that by the time I'm done with that task I will be pretty sick of it, but I'm pretty excited right now to get started even though it will probably get pretty monotonous in short order.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Default Re: Campion Apple

    None of your photos are showing :-(

  13. #13

    Default Re: Campion Apple

    Quote Originally Posted by capefox View Post
    None of your photos are showing :-(
    Oh, lets try this again... Let me know if I get it right this time.

    Circular saw scarphing jig:


    After cut:


    Scarphready:


    Scarph glued and 'Clamped':

  14. #14
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Campion Apple

    Excellent. Now I can enjoy your blog. Such a lovely design.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Campion Apple

    Well, I said that I was excited about laying out the strake dimensions on the scarphed plywood panels; and now that I just finished 3 hours on my knees, I guess I should be careful about what I wish for. I finished gluing up the scarphed panels last night and by lunchtime I was able to clean up the epoxy squeeze out and got started on the marking out the strakes this afternoon. It's not terrible work and somewhat satisfying, but mostly monotonous, and I can see how it would be easy to screw up by misreading or transcribing one of the coordinates wrong. I ended up getting two strakes completed. I think it will go a bit faster tomorrow now that I have dialed in my method, but I'm being as careful as possible and will be double checking everything before making any cuts.

    I see why people pay to have a cnc cutter do this step, but I'll keep plugging away (but might pick up a set of knee pads to make things more comfortable). I took several pictures, but it's a bit hard to see anything of interest.


  16. #16

    Default Re: Campion Apple

    Made a bunch of progress marking and cutting out the planks tonight. I got the second 2 planks marked out in a lot less time than the first 2 and made the call to use my circular saw instead of jig saw to cut out the planks. I also stacked and cut 2 scarphed panels together so I wouldn't have to measure or trace out the second set. I still have strake number 5 (both sides) and the keel strake to cut out, but if all goes well, I may actually be able to get started putting the hull together in the next few days.


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