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Thread: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

  1. #36
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    Feb 2017
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    Durham, Maine, United States
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    6

    Default Glue is Messy

    Last Thursday I was tasked to help screw and glue all the parts of the boat we have built so far together. This involved the transom, the stem, the midship frame, and the side planks. We used a glue gun to glue everything together. The glue we used was epoxy glue. We had to make sure to put enough glue so that when we put the parts together and screwed it glue would squish out. We had to make some new holes to connect the side planks and the transom because when they were screwed in last time the screws were in to deep. I though we did a good job making sure enough glue was applied. I was in charge with doing most of the screwing. I made sure to be careful when screwing the screws back in so it wouldn't go to deep.


  2. #37
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    Durham, Maine, United States
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    Default Working with Kids

    On Tuesday I made up a class to make up due to car trouble on the original class day. I came in as a volunteer to help a class of middle schoolers build their boat. One of the other people that volunteer to help out is a social worker so the first thing that we did was present the students with 4 questions about the class. The students where instructed to answer them at the end of class. Next the students were split up into groups. One group went and made paddles. The rest were working on their boat. One group was shaping the wood for one of the boats they were starting to build, while the other group was screwing and glueing the first boat that they had started making. I was helping out with screwing and glueing. While the kids were there we didn't get much done but after they left Shane had me finish glueing the pieces together. I thought I did a good job with it and It came out really nice and clean.
    Last edited by bcass; 03-06-2017 at 09:13 AM.

  3. #38
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    Kennebunk, Maine
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Attention to Detail is Cleat.

    At the start of the last class, our professor gave us a short lesson on how to safely use epoxy. Which reminded me of a joke. What do you call a 21st century boat builder? An epoxymoron! Anyway, after that Carly, Jenni, and I went back to work on the bulkheads. This time focusing on the cleats. Each bulkhead needed a cleat on each of its sides. Using a the chop saw we cut the cleats to their specified dimensions. We then attached the cleats to the bulkheads by drilling holes from the bulkheads into the cleats and inserting screws. This is only temporary though, we will have to take out the screws and put them back in with a layer epoxy. Meanwhile, with the cleat dry fit to the bulkheads we had to cut bevels into the side cleats of the aft bulkhead. To do this we tilted the plan of the table on the bandsaw to the appropriate degree and started cutting. Unfortunately, we cut the top cleat instead of the side and had to make a new cleat. It was easy enough because already knew how to do it. We then cut the correct cleats with the proper bevel and started to use a block plan on the beveled cleats to smooth them out.



  4. #39
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford, ME, US
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Week 6

    This week in boat building class I focused on one task for the entirety of the class period. I was planing a plank of wood that would collectively become the bottom of the boat. To attach the two planks together we needed to plane the edge of the wood at an angle so when we put them together there would be maximum stability. Once we glued the planks together we clamped them to the table to allow them to dry. The rest of the class was split into two groups. One group was working on screwing and gluing the side planks together with the transom. The other group was working on making the bulkheads for the skiff.

    All I can say is that planing wood is an arm workout! After hours of chipping away at wood I can say that my arms and hands had had enough and I have the calluses to prove it. I was sick the week before this class period so when I walked in and saw that the boat was partially assembled I was very impressed. It motivated me to keep going and get the boat finished.

  5. #40
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    Biddeford, ME, US
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Week Seven Skiff
    This week our class was split into two groups. The first group (Ian, Carly, and Jenni) finished up the bulkheads. Our group started off the class period by cutting the chine logs so they would fit and attach to the side planks of our skiff. After we bent the chine logs into place, we clamped them so we could drill and screw them. Once screwing the chine logs into the starboard and port sides of the skiff, we had to plane them. Each side had to be flat in order for the bottom of the boat to attach smoothly. We used a piece of wood to gauge if the area was still angled or if it was flat.
    This week was A LOT of planing, even more than last week. There were 5 people in my group and we were all planing those chine logs for probably an hour or more. At the end of the class we placed the sheet for the bottom of the skiff onto the body and it looks promising that it will fit evenly. This week I also realized the terrible sound scraping the dried epoxy off the wood made. I am very glad sand paper was used for that task because that scraper sounded like nails on a chalkboard.

  6. #41
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    Biddeford, Maine, USA
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Bulkheads & Chine Logs

    This week consisted of finishing up the fore and aft bulkheads and fitting the chine logs to the bottom of the boat. My group got together and took apart the bulkheads to screw and glue them one at a time. We did this by putting wood glue on the pieces that were being attached, making sure there was enough on there for a secure fit, and screwing them back together. There were two spots that needed a clamp on them because the screw was a little too far away. Next week we'll put two more screws in on those spots to secure it even more. The other group was working on planing the chine logs to match the bottom surface of the boat. Once that is flat and even, we'll be able to attach the bottom of the boat.



    The pictures above show us screwing and gluing the bulkheads together. We were able to practice using the drill. The other group got more practice using the planers. Towards the end of the class we started to work on the rub rails. We got the use the machine planer which was pretty cool. We ran out of time so we'll finish it next week. This week was fun because we were able to listen to music while we were gluing.

  7. #42
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    Feb 2017
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    Durham, Maine, United States
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    Default Attaching The Chine Logs

    Last Class I worked on the Chine Logs and getting those attached to the boat. I had to cut some of the ends off of the two pieces using a hand saw. It was a tricky cut at first, but once I got the hang of it, it got a lot easier. The wood we used to make these was oak wood. The oak wood was strong so it was not an easy thing to cut through. Next my group members and I had to screw the Chine Logs to the Side Planks. We used clamps to hold the shape of the logs. Once we got them in place we drove screws into them so that they stay in place. After that I used a block plane to smooth out the bottom of the Chine Logs so that they were even with the Side Planks and it made a flat surface to hopefully start the Bottom Plank soon. I definitely need to pay a little more attention when block planning because I went to low on some sides of the Chine Logs. After I was made aware of what I was doing wrong I focused a lot more on keeping the surface even and it came out a lot better. I'm hoping that we can start working on getting the Bottom Plank done soon so we could make the boat look almost complete.


  8. #43
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford, ME, USA
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    Default Chine Logs

    This week we worked on finishing the chine logs. The first step in this process was measuring the angles that both ends of the chine logs needed to be cut to fit correctly against the stem and transom. We used a bevel gauge to measure the angles out (see picture) and then a handsaw to cut them. Measuring the angles was a little challenging because they were compound angles, however the practice I had measuring out the bevels for the transom definitely helped. Once we had both compound angles cut on each end of the chine logs we had to measure them to the correct length. To do this, we fit the end of the chine log to the stem and then bent it past the midship frame and to the transom, letting the back end sit on the transom. We then made a mark where the chine log crossed the midship frame and then made a matching mark on the boat. We then fit the end of the chine log to the transom and bent it past the stem and made another mark on the chine log where it crossed the same mark on the boat. The distance between the two marks on the chine log was the length we needed to cut in order for them to fit. Next, we redrew the compound angle on one end of each chine log to cut it to the correct length. To me, this was a very interesting way to cut the chine logs to the correct length. It was definitely a more accurate way than measuring out the total length and it also allowed us to re-cut one of the angles we didn't think was up to par! Next, we fit the chine logs into their spot, clamped them down, and dry fitted them to the side planks (see picture). We ended the class with using the block plane to plane the chine logs flat (see picture) so that the bottom can be attached. Planing the chine logs was pretty challenging because a lot needed to be taken off and the angle needed to be flat with the midship frame and transom. Next class we will need to plane a little bit more and then we will be ready to work on the bottom. It is exciting to see new pieces get added each week and putting on the bottom is a big step towards the final product!


  9. #44
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford,Maine, USA
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    download (1).jpgdownload.jpg
    The week was March second the task building a boat
    We were split up into separate groups to achieve different task of building the boat. I had chosen to take up the task of block planning the stren or the boat so that it was flush and so no wood bits were sticking out. I chose planning because its relaxing and I am able to think of other things while I do it, such like when you exercise.
    Last edited by jellyfish; 03-08-2017 at 11:55 AM.

  10. #45
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    Feb 2017
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    Biddeford, Maine, USA
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    Default Attaching the Chine Logs

    Last class we began by measuring and cutting the chine logs to size and fitting them to our boat. We then clamped the chine logs and proceeded to drive screws about every six inches down both side planks. After we dry fit the chine logs, we removed the screws, glued, and then returned the screws to the appropriate positions. Next came my favorite part of shaving down the excess wood from the chine logs with a block plane. For some reason this job was very satisfying. To wrap up the class we placed the bottom plank on the boat and, amazingly, it sat just as smoothly in position as I could have imagined. It was very cool to used the screwing and gluing skills that we learned the previous week and to see how much those skills have improved. Next week we will be cutting out the bottom plank and attaching it to the rest of out boat.
    Last edited by GabeValley; 03-09-2017 at 12:00 PM.

  11. #46
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    Kennebunk, Maine
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Now That’s How You Block Plane

    During last weeks class, my group continued working on the aft and fore bulkheads. We started by unscrewing the attached cleats from the bulkheads. Since we already done this once or twice before, we had a little fun posing for shots as you can see in the first picture. Once the bulkheads were completely taken apart , we apply wood glue to both the base of the bulkheads and the bottom of the cleats. We spread the glue , covering the entire surface where the two parts would meet. This strengthens the overall structure of the bulkheads. We then put the screws back in. We noticed a gap on one of the cleats, so we clamped in tightly to create a seal with the glue, cleat, and bulkhead. Next week, when the glue is dried, we will put in another screw. We wiped up the excess glue. We also cleaned the beveled sides with the block planes some more and smoothed out some of the edges with sandpaper.





  12. #47
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford, ME, US
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    Default Re: Screwing and Glueing

    Echo Bay Dory Skiff Week Eight:

    During this class period, my group worked on cutting the bottom plank for the boat, taking off the chine logs, gluing and screwing them back on, and gluing the bottom plank to complete the hull of the boat. Emma and I used the jig saw to carefully cut to the line on the bottom plank of our boat while Brandon and Gabe continued to plane the chine logs. When we were finished outlining the the bottom plank with the jig saw, we made sure it fit onto the boat with a little over hang on all sides that we could plane later. Next, we mixed the epoxy with a 2:1 ratio of part A to part B. We added saw dusk to thicken it. We glued and screwed the chine logs back into the boat and did the same with the hull.
    This week was very rewarding. We got to see somewhat of a finished boat frame by the end of the class period. It was a great leaving point to head into spring break. The thickened epoxy we were working with this week was interesting. It was very thick and looked like peanut butter. The epoxy was drying very quickly so we had to work fast along with it. One challenging aspect of this week was drilling and screwing at an angle into the chine logs. I messed up on a few, but finally got the hang of it by the end. I am excited to pick up where we left off after spring break.

  13. #48
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford, ME, USA
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    Default Here Comes the Bottom

    This week we spent most of class working on the bottom plank. The first thing we did was trace the outline of the boat on the marine grade plywood we were using for the bottom plank (see picture). After this we now had an outline of our bottom plank. Next we used the jigsaw and the cutting to the line technique to cut out the bottom plank (see picture). Cutting to the line was very important, especially when it came to the bottom plank, so it was a little nerve-racking for me when I was cutting. I think it worked out pretty well though and all of the practice I had in previous classes definitely helped. Next we dry fitted the bottom plank to the chine logs with a couple of screws and made some registration marks. After dry fitting, we unscrewed both the chine logs and bottom plank from the boat so that we could glue them to the boat. The glue we used this time was thicker than the glue we used previously so that it wouldnít drip and would fill all the gaps (see picture). We used the screw and glue techniques to reattach both chine logs and bottom plank (see picture). Seeing everything fit together correctly was very rewarding and exciting. Next class we will work on planning the sides of the bottom plank so that they line up with the side planks. I am looking forward to this because I enjoy block planing; I like making things the right size so that they fit together as they should.


  14. #49
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford, Maine, USA
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    We Have a Hull!

    Last week's class was very exciting because we were able to screw and glue the bottom of the boat to the frame we already had to make the hull! One group worked on this by using epoxy and fitting the base to the outline of boat. They made the bottom a little bigger than needed so they had room to work with. It would be trouble if it were too small and there were gaps in the hull. When we get back from spring break, they will hand plane the edges to be flush with the side planks.



    While one group worked on that, my group worked on the rubrail. We cut the pieces to length using a hand saw. Then we used hand planers to shape an taper onto the front and back of them. This is more for artistic design and will hopefully look good on the boat! Next week we'll do a little touch up sanding and screw them to the boat so they can be properly placed. The next step will be to glue the rubrail to the side planks.
    It was a relaxing week with just planing and putting the boat together. I hadn't gotten to use the hand plane a lot so this was a good opportunity to work on my skills with it and get better. It was nice to see the hull all put together because now we've really got the base of our boat done, so now we just have to work on the finishing touches.


  15. #50
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford, ME, USA
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Week Five, Week Fun
    Week five we cranked up the tunes and got crackin. I definitely liked that we tried playing our low music in our small group because it gave us more enthusiasm and fun, a nice touch to week 5 in the shop. Ian, Jenni and I finally, officially finished our bulkheads. From last week, they required some sanding, which was tedious, but straightforward and we knew what to do to perfect them. We used some block planes then some sanding blocks (in picture 1 Ian has a great angle form with a block plane). Sometimes itís difficult to block plain and the wood gives you a hard time with certain angles, so you have to tweak your form to get the right stroke. Soon enough they were set for screwing and glueing. Well, first we had to unscrew the screws that we put through last week (seen in picture 2). Then we glued and screwed the planks to the bulkheads. For glue, we used some regular wood glue. We used a small paint brush to lather both sections of each piece of wood, then carefully placed them together where they belong ed (seen in picture 3 by Ian). One at a time, we glued the piece onto the wood, then together we carefully screwed the screws back in (picture 4). Eventually the two bulkheads had individual planks glued and screwed to the bulkheads and we were done.
    At this point, we were given the choice to either work on the breasthook and quarter knees or the rubrails, also known as many different things. We wanted to work on the breasthook and quarter knees, but Professor Hall swayed us to the rubrails. We grabbed a long piece of wood and measured it. The thickness was not what we wanted it to be, so we had to run it through the planer (shown in picture 5). After running it through twice, using each other to make sure it ran through well, we neared the end of class. Next week, we will continue working on the rubrails and Iím guessing it will take a few weeks. This is exciting to me, especially because we have the opportunity to make them so unique. This is usually a part of the boat that distinguishes it from others, so Iím excited to be a part of the signature feature.
    Picture 1
    Picture 2
    Picture 3
    Picture 4
    Picture 5


  16. #51
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    Feb 2017
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    Durham, Maine, United States
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    Default More Glue

    Last class I worked on screwing and gluing the chine logs and the bottom plank to the boat. We used the epoxy glue to glue everything together. We had to drill the bottom plank on, then take all of the screws out that we had just screwed in. We then had to unscrew the chine logs too. Next we began gluing. After we glued the chine logs in we screwed them back into place. Then we glued the bottom plank to the bottom of the boat and re-screwed the screw back in. The gluing wasn't as messy of a job as it usually is although I did unfortunately get some on my shirt. All in all I think I did a good job with what I did. I made sure to apply enough glue so they would stay and I did a good job screwing and unscrewing the screws.

    These are pictures of us screwing on the bottom plank, placing glue for the bottom plank, and re-screwing the bottom plank after it had been glued down. I am looking forward to smoothening out the edges next class so that the boat looks more neat.

  17. #52
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    Biddeford, Maine, USA
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    Default Screwing and Glueing

    This past week, we worked as a group to glue the bottom plank of our skiff to the chine logs. The adhesive we used was epoxy which we mixed ourselves. We also mixed in wood flour to make our glue more viscous. We laid the glue onto the chine logs quickly so that we were able to lay the bottom plank on top of it before it could dry. Once we had the bottom plank in place, we re-drove screws into the holes that had been drilled in our prior class. Finally, we have a hull! Practicing my glueing and screwing skills was enjoyable because I have improved quite a bit since the beginning of the project. I am excited to come back after break and continue working on the Echo Bay Dory Skiff!

  18. #53
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    Biddeford, ME, USA
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    Default Re: More Glue

    Week 6 and a Fix
    Week 6 was right before Spring Break. Jenni, Ian and I started with a dilemma because we could find the wood that we put aside for our rubrails. They were originally already measured and essentially perfect. We couldn’t find them, so we had to problem solve. We eventually found two pieces that were just barely long enough. We made our markings as to where to block plane down to, then we got started(seen in picture 1 and 2). Ian seemed to have the best block plane and finished his one piece of wood(both sides), while Jenni and I each took a side of the other piece. We finished block planing at about the same time, which took awhile. Block planing definitely takes a lot longer than most would probably think. It soothing, but my hands were sore the next day. Again, I really enjoy this part of building our boat because this is a component that makes it unique. It’s worth the soreness and time.

    While we were shaping our rubrails, our other classmates glued the bottom of the boat on(seen in picture 3). It was so cool to see a big, basic part of the boat come together. It was especially nice to see right before we all headed off for Spring Break.

    Sidenote-Ian and I got to use the skills we’ve obtained so far over break. Ian broke a bed frame(the frame wasn’t put together well, so it actually wasn't his fault completely) and we screwed and glued it back together. It was pretty funny and also fun that we got to apply what we’ve learned in class to real world things.
    Picture 1
    Picture 2
    Picture 3


  19. #54
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    Jan 2017
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    Kennebunk, Maine
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Oh Yeah! Rub Those Rails.
    What The Hull Are You Talking About?

    During our last session at the Compass Project session, the class was finally able to screw and glue the bottom to the frame. I must say, we have a pretty nice hull. Meanwhile, Jenni, Carl and I worked on the rubrails. First we, used a planer to make sure the pieces of wood we were using was completely even. We then spent the rest of the class time using the block planes on the rubrails, so that they have a rounded look.






  20. #55
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford, Maine, USA
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Finishing Touches

    This week my group worked on attaching the rub rails to the top of the side planks. We lined it up to be flush with the back of the transom and started clamping. We clamped sections one at a time. As we were clamping on one end, a person was on the other end of the rub rail bending it to fit the shape/ bend of the side planks. Once the rub rails were clamped flush, we drilled countersunk holes about every six inches where the screws were going to go. Once the holes were countersunk, we then screwed together the rub rails and side planks used 3/4" screws. After both sides were screwed onto the boat, then we took off the clamps. While we were doing this, the other group worked on the breast and quarter hooks. Next week we should be able to screw and glue all these pieces together! This week was fun because we got to work on the "guts" of the boat since the hull is finished. Next we'll work on getting the bulkheads put in.

    A. B. C.
    Pictures A/B are the rub rails. Picture C is cutting out the breast hook

    *Helpful Hint*
    When using the metal clamps, put pieces of scrap wood between them and the piece of wood that you're clamping. This will prevent dimpling of the wood.

  21. #56
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford, ME, USA
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    Default Quater Knees

    This week I worked on the quarter knees for our boat. We first cut out the quarter knee shape from the boat plans and then glued it to a piece of plywood (see picture). This gave us an outline that was easy to trace onto our piece of oak that we decided to use for the quarter knees. After tracing the outline onto the oak we used the band saw and the cutting to the line technique to cut them out (see picture). I definitely liked cutting the oak on the band saw more than I do the plywood; it seemed as though I had a lot more control when trying to cut right up to the line, probably because it took longer to cut through the oak. After cutting them out we used a spokeshave to smooth out the rounder sides of the quarter knees (see picture). I had never used a spokeshave before so it was a little hard to get the hang of at first but then I figured it out and I enjoyed using it to smooth out the edges. The last thing we worked on was measuring and cutting the bevels for the quarter knees. This was a little challenging but I think our group did some good problem solving. After cutting the bevels the first time one side was a little off and left a gap when fit up against the side planks. To fix this we measured the gap and cut a little bit off the top of the bevel (see picture). Once we recut them, they fit great and we will work next class on attaching them to the boat.


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