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Thread: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

  1. #71
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    Dec 2016
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    So. Ill. usa
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Thank you all for posting this. I'm looking forward for the launch !

  2. #72
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford, Maine, USA
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    I'll Keel Over!

    This week we worked on the keel and gluing the seat cleats! Before we did that though we hand planed and sanded all the sharp edges of the boat to give them a slight round over. This is so the paint can adhere to it better and no one will get hurt on a sharp point. We also puttied over the screws and any gaps between the side planks and rub rails. To figure out where the keel was going to go, we flipped the boat upside down and made a chalk like down the center. We then worked on screwing and gluing the keel together. While a group did that, another cut, screwed, and glued the seat cleats onto the boat. We also were able to plane the aft bulkhead to fit the shape of the boat, so that was screwed and glued as well!



    It was another week of everyone on the boat at once. Using the hand plane is getting easier as we keep using it to shape the boat. it's cool that we got the seat cleats in because that means we're one step closer to finishing the boat! It's a big relief that we were able to fix the aft bulkhead and move on with it.

  3. #73
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford, ME, US
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    Default Re: Screwing and Glueing


    Week Eleven Blog Post:

    We have all learned so much about the art of boat building. I would say each week it becomes easier and easier to work as a team to meet our final goal. During week eleven, we all came together to sand and plane the uneven or sharp pieces of the boat until we got the approval from Shane, our instructor. From there, a small group of us puttied all the cracks and holes. We made sure to press down firmly on the putty knife to be as accurate and precise as possible. Towards the end of class, I had joined a smaller group who was working on the keel of the boat. There was in issue with drilling and screwing one of the screws into the base of the keel, but after much screeching from the power tools we were able to set it into place. We were supposed to add the fiber glass component to the boat during week eleven, but we didnít quite get there and will save it for the beginning of week twelve.
    I know I mention how excited I am to finish the boat from week to week but I just really want to express that emotion to my readers. There are about 2-3 more work periods and then we are painting the boat and launching it! Time has passed so quickly. It feels like just yesterday that we were learning how to cut to the line. Iím a little upset that the end of the semester is coming so fast because I would have loved to start my independent project of making oars but college is keeping me very busy and I wouldnít have time. With that being said, I would love to connect further with the Compass Project and see what else I get involved in.

  4. #74
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford, ME, USA
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    Default Keel and Skeg

    This week we worked as a class to prep the boat for fiberglass. We put putty on the screw holes and any place that was uneven. Then we sanded and made sure everything was flush and smooth. After that we broke up into smaller groups to work on different sections. I worked on marking the keel location on the bottom of the boat and attaching the keel and skeg. To mark it, we created a chalk line down the center of the boat and then drew a line off the centerline that was half of the keel width away (see picture). This will allow us to line up one side the keel to make sure it is centered. After that, we centered the skeg on the keel and dry fitted them together (see picture). Next we unscrewed them, glued them together using epoxy, and then screwed them back together. This was a little challenging, especially when trying to make sure there were no gaps. At first we screwed them together and didnít use clamps, this wasnít a very good idea because there were many gaps left in between the screws. Once we saw that, we unscrewed them again and then put clamps, which helped get rid of the gaps (see picture). There was a lot of trial and error involved with putting these two pieces together (making sure everything was centered, fitting the screws so they were flush, and making sure there were no gaps). Even though it was challenging, I think we did a good job of problem solving and working together to find solutions. We only have a few weeks of class left, and it is very rewarding and exciting to see all of the pieces come together!


  5. #75
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    Jan 2017
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    Default Re: Screwing and Glueing

    Almost Floating to Heaven, During Week 11
    During week 11, we worked to our max in the shop, we were very efficient with our time. Once there, Shane gave us the rundown of jobs that were next on the list and we got crackin’. INitially we prepped the boat and puttied the holes and indents. Several of us grabbed parts for sanding and planing, while Jenni removed the cross spall off of the midship frame (Image 1). I used a saw and cut the stem so it was in line with the boat. That took awhile and was quite strenuous. For awhile I helped sand, but then Jenni got tired of planing the stem, so I took over. There was a great deal of unevenness by the bow, so I planed it as much as I could to make it flush. That was also exhausting. For most of class, the majority of us sanded the boat (Image 2).Next, Shane gave RIhanna and I the job of cutting, screwing, and gluing all of the seat cleats. I mostly took the lead in measuring, marking, screwing, and gluing while RIhanna cut them out. Each seat cleat was different because they were placed on different parts of the boat, so I had to configure how they would fit. It was a little mind boggling at first, but I soon got the jist and was on a roll. Just as class was ending, with help, I got the last seat cleat glued and screwed. Thursday was a great day for getting things checked off the list and the boat keeps looking better every week (Image 3). Just 3 more weeks in the shop until we put it on the water and test it out!
    Image 1
    Image 2
    Image 3

    Last edited by Carly; 04-13-2017 at 01:05 PM.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    the day there was dust everywhere
    planning, sanding were only some of the things we did. People were also put to the job of putting all the holes. People were also put to the task of starting on the seats for the boat. This weeks jobs involved much vigorous activity with all the sanding and such.
    Last edited by jellyfish; 04-13-2017 at 11:24 AM.

  7. #77
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    Feb 2017
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    Durham, Maine, United States
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    Default Screws are a pain sometimes

    Last week in class I started out by sanding and smoothening the sides of the boat with a sander so that we could fiberglass the boat. After I helped use a vacuum to help clean up some of the dust left from sanding. Next I worked on screwing and gluing the skeg to the keel. Before I got to work on that I had to snap a line down the middle of the bottom plank using a chalk line.Then I had to mark up the keel and keg so we could line them up properly. After that we drilled some holes in the keel to make it easier to drill into the skeg. Then we drilled the holes into the skeg. Next we drove the screws in. On the last screw the head of the screw snapped off just as we drove the screw in there. Then we tried using a bigger screw because we were out of the other screw that we used. Unfortunately because somebody put the wrong sized drill bit in the wrong spot we were trying to drive a screw into a hole thinner than the screw. This took us a while to figure out thats why the screw didn't want to go all the way in. Then after we finally got it in we had to unscrew it all so we could glue them together. So we quickly glued the skeg onto the the keel and drove the screws back in. Im looking forward to putting the completed piece of the skeg and keel onto the boat.

  8. #78
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    Jan 2017
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    Kennebunk, Maine
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Prepping for Fiberglass

    As the class gets ever closer to the launch date of our echo bay dory skiff, we keep making strides to reach that goal on time. During the last class, we worked to prep the hull for fiberglass tape that would go on the seams. For the fiberglass tape effectively, we needed to create a smooth surface where there would be no gaps. So we applied putty to the remaining screw holes, the gaps in the seams, and any areas that would cause problems with the tape. We then sanded down the surface and cleaned off the outside of the hull. We then flipped the boat over, where we unscrewed the dry fit bulkheads and applied epoxy and re-screwed them in. we also created seat cleats, that we also glue and screwed to the hull.




  9. #79
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford, Maine, USA
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Keel Beams!

    This week we screwed and glued the keel to the bottom of the boat, applied the fiber glass to the bottom edge of the boat, and started working on the seats. It took about three people to hold the keel in place while two others screwed it together. We screwed from the inside of the boat out so they we had to flip the boat over and the people screwing went underneath. It was important to hold the keel in place and put pressure on it where it was being screwed so there would be no air gaps between it and the bottom of the boat.



    Once the keel was on, we started working on the pattern to the aft and fore seats. At first I didn't really understand why we had to make a pattern but Shane explained it. It's basically so we can get the exact measurements for the seats. We took scrap would and super glued it together to form the pattern. Once we had the pattern we traced it over a big piece of plywood and used the jig saw to cut it out. We had to adjust the jig saw to the angle of the side planks where the seats were going to go.


  10. #80
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    Saco, ME
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    You are learning some good boatbuilding techniques with Shane. Nice work.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  11. #81
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    Jan 2017
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    Biddeford, ME, US
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    Default Re: Screwing and Glueing


    Boat Building Blog Post Week Twelve:

    This week in boat building we were adding the finishing touches to the inside of the boat, along with some minor details on the outside of it. In the beginning of class, the two shortest people were chosen to go under the boat to drill, screw, and glue the keel into place. Those two people happened to be Emma and myself. Instead of following the traditional steps of attaching the keel, we jumped ahead to gluing first and then drilling and screwing. Gabe, Emma, and I were then tasked to make a seat pattern for our boat. We were puzzled on how to do that until Shane showed us how. It is quite an intricate process. A couple key steps in making a seat pattern would include:
    1. Identifying the important points you want to outline with the wood
    2. Make a general layout of the seat with strategically placed small planks of wood
    3. Hot glue them together
    4. Trace and cut out the seat
    There is a picture above that shows what our pattern was for the seat in the back of the boat. After I made the seat pattern for the back of the boat, Emma and Gabe continued on to do the seat pattern for the front of the boat. I helped with spring cleaning of the workshop. At the end of class, the fiber glass was added to the bottom of the boat and was allowed to dry over the weekend.
    As Iíve said time and time again I am super excited to see this boat come to finish. Next week, we are going to be discussing colors for our boat. It seems like everyone in the class is excited for this. I get a feeling our boat is going to be exotic and colorful, from what Iíve heard. This semester has gone by so quickly and I cannot believe we only have a couple weeks left. The last thing I am really hoping for is to have a nice day for our launch!

  12. #82
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build


    The week we cleaned
    this week we glue and screwed the keel in to place, this job was given to the two shorter people and they had to go under the boat to complete this task. Other things that happened was figuring out the seat patterns which seemed like a tetris induced headache. We also added fiber glass to the bottom of the boat, which moves quiet easily and becomes transparent when glue is added. Other then that the usual sanding, putting was done.



    Last edited by jellyfish; 04-18-2017 at 03:38 PM.

  13. #83
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build


  14. #84
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    Default Re: Screwing and Glueing

    Week 12, Nothing Was Done By Ourselves
    During week 12, things got messy. Right off the bat, we all did final prep for the fiber glass. It would line the rubrails and bottom of the Transom, so we focused on puttying and sanding (Image 1) those areas down so it was flush. Brandon and I puttied while the seats were being worked on by others. For the front seat, I measured the angle using a bevel gauge and the actual triangular shape was already shaped out, as seen in Image 2. They traced out the triangular shape of the seat, then using the angle I measured with the bevel gauge, angled the table saw so the cut would be the same angle. The rear seat was more complex, so Shane, Rihanna and Gabe were working on it together. Once the seats werenít the focus anymore, Ian, Shane, Gabe, and I fiberglassed the boat. We put on gloves, cut out the fiberglass, mixed the epoxy at a 2:1 ratio, then we started the difficult part, applying the epoxy. Our goal was to have the fiberglass be translucent. For this, we discovered that the best technique was to lather the boat where the fiberglass touched it, then rub it in until it was translucent. To do this, we decided Ian would paint the epoxy on and I used my gloved hands to rub in the glue. I also made sure there were no bubbles and the fiberglass was taut to the boat (Image 4). At this point, we just all needed to wait for it for it to dry, so we left class slightly early.

    Image 1
    Image 2
    Image 3
    Image 4


  15. #85
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    Feb 2017
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    Durham, Maine, United States
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    Default It's all in the Wrist

    This week in class I worked on a few projects. I assisted in screwing and gluing the keel to the back of the boat. My job was to hold down the keel as close to the boat as I could. This was an energy tasking job because it was requiring a lot of force to keep the keel down. After the keel was attached I got the wonderful opportunity to putty the spots where the screws were so that the surface would be flat and didn't have any holes. This was my first time puttying at first I wasn't doing a great job, but after some helpful criticism I got the hang of it. After puttying all the screw holes that needed puttying, I assisted in making the seats. We used the jigsaw to cut out the seats. At one point the wood started to smoke and almost catch fire, but we were able to finish the cut before it was able to catch fire. I am looking forward to putting on the seats next class.

  16. #86
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    Feb 2017
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    Biddeford, Maine, USA
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    We had a very productive class last week, tackling a multiple projects at the same time. First, we all worked together attaching the skeg and keel to the bottom plank of out boat with glue and screws. After this we took a oddly efficient approach to creating outlines for our seats. This approach involved laying sticks down on top of one another in what looks like a random order, when actually it was measuring out points for each corner of our seat. Although this technique seemed totally crazy to me at first, I will admit that it worked excellently and is a technique I will most likely use in future woodworking projects. Lastly, we fiberglassed all edges joining the bottom plank and side planks for structural support and to prevent the chance of leaks. I am very excited to begin priming and painting out boat next week!

  17. #87
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    Default Seat Patterns

    This week we started class by screwing and gluing the keel to the bottom of the boat. We had already marked the placement last week so all we had to do was mark where the screws were going and screw and glue it in place. Drilling the holes and driving the screws was a little challenging because the boat was flipped over so the other half of the class could prep for fiberglass. This meant that we had to go underneath the boat to drill and drive the screws in (see picture). I wasnít too excited to go underneath but it turned out to be pretty cool and felt like I was working in a different environment. After attaching the keel (see picture), I spent the rest of the class working on seat patterns. To do this, Shane showed us a really interesting way to make a pattern that we could use to create the seats. We spread small pieces of plywood around where the seat would be and made sure that they hit ďcritical pointsĒ such as the edges/ends of the seats (see pictures). Then we hot glued these pieces together so that we could trace and mark out the points on the wood we were using for the seats. After tracing and connecting the points we cut out the seats. At first, these seat patterns seemed very confusing and I didnít quite understand how we could go from the pattern to an outline of the actual seat. However, after doing the first one with help from Shane it made a lot more sense and is definitely a cool and much easier way to create the correct seat shape.


  18. #88
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    Kennebunk, Maine
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Our Skiff is Going To Keel It.
    Last class we worked on touching up the hull, gluing and screwing the keel, and the future seats. The first thing that I did was sand down some of the rough spots on the outside of the hull. I smooth and rounded the corners where the side planks meet the bottom. If there was excess putty or glue anywhere, I took that off. Then I helped keep the keel bent onto the bottom of the boat as best I could to keep it aligned properly, while other students glued and screwed it onto the hull. Just another step closer to a completed product. We then flipped the boat over and began working on the inside. We had previously dry fit the seat cleats, so we screwed and glued those in. We that used various scraps of wood to create platelets for the seats. We then took our platelets and traced an outline on a piece of plywood to be cut out. I then spent some time tidying up the workspace. I can’t wait to see what we do in the next class.




  19. #89

    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    I am always fascinated to hear peoples' unique interpretations and reflections about a shared experience.

    We could have spent an entire class period talking about and practicing the process of making seat patterns, instead we plowed right through it, without any real pre-teaching. Several students touched upon many of the critical details about making the hot-glued seat patterns, the purpose of which was solely to define the "critical points" needed to create a profile of each seat.

    One important detail, that hasn't been mentioned yet, is that we shimmed up the patterns by the thickness of the seats, so that the underside of the pattern represented the top edge of the seat. This enables you to cut the correct bevel on the sides of the seats using the bandsaw, which only tilts in one direction. The shims under the patterns make the process look more complicated/messy than it actually is.

    Stay tuned for lots of great boatbuilding posts as we approach the bittersweet culmination of the semester.

  20. #90
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    It's a Prime Time to Paint!

    This week consisted of fitting and screwing the seats into the boat, marking where the ore locks would go and attaching them, and then priming the boat. The fore and aft seats had already been cut out, so all that was needed was to screw them to the seat cleats. The middle seat needed to be made so two of the students did that while the others continued to screw. While they were doing that, I measured 12 inches aft from the midship frame on both sides of the boat on the rub rails where the ore locks were going to go. Then I marked, and screwed them in. We removed everything we screwed on because we had to prime the boat and then those pieces would be added for good.



    After everything was fitted, we cleaned off the boat with a vacuum and isopropyl alcohol to get it ready for priming. Next, we took paint rollers and foam brushes to prime the boat. We used the rollers to cover large areas and then went over it with the foam tips to make the coat even and get into the tight corners/ spaces. The foam tips are good for evening out the lines and dispersing the paint so there wouldn't be any drip marks or lines. We did this to the whole boat and seats. We prime the boat so it adds another layer of water resistance and protection.



    As the semester winds down it is very exciting to be finishing up the boat. All that's left is to paint and launch it. It will be fun to see if all this work pays off and the boat floats or not!

  21. #91
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    The week my sweater got covered in primer
    This week we put the primer on the boat after cleaning it down. There were also children there once there teachers started to leave i went in to help out with them, it was quiet fun I helped some of the children add character to their boats.

  22. #92
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    Default Re: Screwing and Glueing

    Us Saints Painting Are Something So Quaint
    Week 13 was a lot of fun. Last week we cut out our seats and they were ready to go for this week. As we all arrive, in the gorgeous warm weather, we cranked some music and dry fitted the seats. I, with two others, worked on the seat near the Transom(Image 1), Gabe and Brandon worked on the seat near the Midship Frame, Ian worked on the front seat and Jenni dry fitted the front hook and oarlocks. Once we all finished that, we removed the seats, oarlocks, and front hook. We then brought the boat inside. As a team, we all cleaned the boat. I grabbed the vacuum and everyone else used alcohol and rags to wipe down and scrub away the dirtiness. As we finished cleaning, we prepped to paint. We layed down some plastic, put some gloves on, some of us were smart to grab aprons. We each were given different painting instruments. Ian and Jenni had some small rollers, some of us had 4Ē foam poly brushes, some of us has 2Ē foam poly brushes. As we started painting the insides of the boat, Ian and Jenni rolled on some paint and the rest of us evened everything out and got the small spaces. We then carefully flipped the boat over and continued the same technique on the bottom of the boat(Image 2). Once the inside of the boat was painted, we moved onto the seats that were placed on a nearby table. We painted one side then placed some screws into their holes for support and so the wet paint could dry and not touch the table.We then painted the other side and waited for them to dry(Image 3). That was a wrap for week 13!


    Image 1
    Image 2
    Image 3


  23. #93
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    Mar 2005
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Nice work on the Echo Bay. I am down in Maryland attending a Teaching with Small Boats Conference. Brought one of the two Echo Bay's my students built last summer. It is a really sweet boat!
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  24. #94
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    Biddeford, Maine, USA
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    Default Finishing Touches

    This week we spent the first part of the class sanding down our boat, making sure it was in smooth, paint-ready condition. We then wiped our boat down, mixed our primer, and began applying a first coat of primer to our boat. We used a rolling-tipping approach to applying paint. We first rolled the primer onto the boat and then went behind and "tipped" the layer with a foam brush with the grain of the wood so that no brush/roller streaks were present. Although this post seems more brief than past weeks, a lot of work was done. Sanding and priming the boat was very time consuming. Although I have done lots of painting before, it is interesting to learn this new "rolling-tipping" approach. It ensures that no streaks or paint drips are left on your final project. I will most likely use this technique in future woodworking projects.

  25. #95
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    Default Re: Screwing and Glueing

    Boat Building Week Thirteen:

    This week in boat building we had a late start because the shop was running a camp for 7-10 year olds. We brought our boat into the shop around 4 pm and began to prime it. I was in charge of mixing the primer. The primer is an oil based mixture so we had to work carefully with it because it is insoluble in water, meaning it will not wash out of clothes. Our class was split into three groups, one group had rollers, and the other two groups had foam brushes. The rollers primed the larger spaces of the boat and the foam brush people primed the details of the boat along with smoothing out the roller marks. We were supposed to talk about the paint color we wanted to use on the boat for week 14 but never got around to having that discussion. However, I think one member really wanted to paint the boat sea green so I believe that will be the color we are using.
    There are only two weeks left of our class. We are launching our boat on the 11th of May in the Saco at the University of New England. Iím eager to see how all of our hard work has paid off. During the semester I had to miss a class because of a sickness, so in the next two weeks I have to make up a three-hour class period alone. I am interested what I am going to do because I think the only thing we have left to do is paint, but you never know! This boat building class has been the most rewarding art class I have taken in my career of education. It is simply amazing that we all came together with little or no experience in wood working and made a 12-foot-long Echo Bay Dory Skiff!

  26. #96
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    It’s Prime Time!
    This past class was awesome!! With our seats cut out and ready to go, we were ready to dry fit them to the seat cleats. We were lucky enough to be able to do this outside and listen to some great music through Carly’s car radio. I had the pleasure of dit fitting the front seat. When I attempted this, I quickly realized it was too big. So I cut off about an inch of the tip, beveling the edge so that it would fit nicely. Jenni dry fitted the front hook and oarlocks. While the rest of my classmates dry fitted the mid seat and transom seat. Well, except for Paige who was helping out inside the shop. Once we all finished that, we removed the seats, oarlocks, and front hook. We then brought the boat inside. Then, we all cleaned the boat. I used alcohol and rags to wipe down and scrub away the dirtiness. As we finished cleaning, we prepped to start priming the hull. We layed down some plastic, put some gloves on, some of us were smart to grab aprons. We each were given different painting instruments. Jenni and I used small rollers, while the others used 4” foam poly brushes and 2” foam poly brushes. Jenni and I applied the majority of the paint to the surfaces, while everyone else smoothed out the paint and got the edges and tight spaces. We then carefully flipped the boat over and continued the same thing on the bottom of the boat. Once the inside of the boat was painted, we primed the seats that were placed on a nearby table. We painted one side then placed some screws into their holes for support and so the wet paint could dry and not touch the table. It was a pretty cool trick. We then painted the other side. We finally spent the rest of the time cleaning up.



  27. #97
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    Default Priming the Boat

    This week we worked on finishing up the seats and priming the boat to get ready for the painting process. We started by having one group cut out the middle seat and then screwed in all of the seats to the boat. It was very rewarding to see the seats go from a pattern of strips of wood hot glued together to the final product fitted in the correct spot. Once the seats were fitted, we unscrewed them so it would be easier to prime underneath them and then prepped the boat for priming. To prime the boat we used rollers to prime the larger surfaces and then foam tip brushes to get to the more detailed areas. This was a really cool process because it meant that all the pieces were completed and everything fit together. The priming process was interesting because as I went over certain areas, it reminded me of all the work that went into creating them and putting all the pieces together. I look forward to painting in the next few classes!


  28. #98
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    Durham, Maine, United States
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    Default She's Primed and ready for Paint

    This week in class I worked on attaching the seats to the boat. I mainly helped with the middle seat. We had to pick out the wood and cut the seat out. Then we screwed the seat in along with the other seats. After we screwed them in we unscrewed them and brought the whole boat inside because it was outside to start. Then we got the boat ready to be primed. We first started with the inside of the boat. We had to cover the whole inside of the boat with primer before we flipped the boat over and did the bottom. I used a smaller brush to get the fine details and cover some of the really small areas. Then we flipped the boat over we primed the entire bottom of the boat. This was a lot quicker than the front because there weren't a lot of little areas that could be missed. I'm looking forward to painting the boat next week.

  29. #99
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build


    This week on boat building
    we sanded and cleaned the boat then we finally got to painting it. The colors we choose were sea foam green, sapphire blue, and red; the main part of the boat was sapphire blue the rubbrails and seats were sea foam green and the tip of the bat was red. all in all in is turning out nicely.

  30. #100
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    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    Watching Paint Dry

    This week was really fun! After priming last week it was finally time to paint the boat. This involved lightly sanding the primer and picking out the colors we wanted to use. Three of us chose the paint colors while the others were sanding the boat and cleaning it. We chose three colors; electric blue for the body of the boat, red for the breast hook and quarter knees, and sea-foam green for the rub rails and seats. Normally, we would tape off the parts of the boat that are different colors and paint one color at a time. However, due to time constraints, we couldn't tape off the sections so we had to paint as close as we could to merge the colors. We painted it using the same method as we did when we applied the primer; rolling and tipping.

    Next week, we will apply another coat of paint, fully covering the boat. Then after that it'll be time to launch the boat into the Saco! I'm very excited to finally launch it after a semester of hard work. It will be cool to see if it actually floats or not. Having the snow day earlier in the semester kind of set us back a little. If we had that extra week, we could have applied another coat of paint for extra protection. But once the semester is over, I'll be able to say that I helped build a boat.

  31. #101
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Biddeford, ME, US
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Screwing and Glueing


    Week Fourteen Boat Building Blog Post:

    During class this week, the majority of the time was spent painting the inside of the boat. Even though we were minutes away from painting it we still were not sold on painting the whole boat sea foam green. Carly, Emma, and I looked at the paint selections and decided that a dark blue with sea foam green accents would look best on the boat. We determined that the whole outside and keel of the boat would be blue, the seats and rub rails would be sea foam green and the breast hook and quarter knees would be red. Before we could actually dip our brushes into the paint, we had to scuff the primer and make sure the boat was smooth and clean before we put our first coat onto it. By the end of class, we had the first coat of the inside mostly done!

    Before class, Shane took us to a boat that was outside. I loved that the boat was white and blue with a wood finish. I think that is the classic boat look and it is very aesthetically pleasing to look at. Our decision to not paint the entire boat sea foam green was a good one. However, after completing the first coat on the inside of the boat, I regret choosing more than one color because it very difficult to keep the paint on its designated boat part. We have one more class until we see our boat launch. Stay tuned!

  32. #102
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Biddeford, ME, US
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Screwing and Glueing


    Making up class:

    Monday afternoon after our week fourteen class, I came into the shop to make up a class from the semester. My task was to put a second coat on the inside of the boat and then flip it around and put the first coat on the outside and bottom of it. I scuffed the first coat of the inside so it was smooth. I had to also make sure it was clean so I could paint on it. Then, I taped off the seats and mid-ship frame and added a second coat of sea foam green to those. Once that was completed, I had someone help me flip over the boat so I could begin to paint the outside and bottom. This was the easy part because I just had to roll and tip the entire thing.

    It was funny that taping and painting the mid-ship frame and seats of the inside took me longer than painting the entire outside and bottom of the boat. I think it would have been smart if we taped from the beginning. It is definitely less stressful when the paint hit the tape instead of the boat. After painting that boat for three hours I was very ready to get out of there. It was a rainy day so we couldn’t open the big doors and the paint started to give me a headache. I hope we are able to make the final touches we need next class because it is our last one.

  33. #103
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Biddeford, ME, USA
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: UNE Student Echo Bay Dory Skiff Build

    The Last Blog Post on the Coast
    Week 14 was pretty straight forward. Once we all arrived, everyone, except Jenni presented their powerpoints, all originating from different degrees of research on an artist, boatbuilder from Maine. I chose JB Baker, a boatbuilder and manager for Front Street Shipyard in Belfast, Maine. I was pretty nervous to present, even though we have a very small class, but I think it went pretty well. My second slide was titled,”Who the heck is he?” and from that point on, Jenni could not stop laughing, so that was hysterical, to note. That definitely helped my nerves. Presentations complete, we split into two groups: one group making color decisions and the other group prepping the boat for painting. I was part of the paint decision group and it was a fun choice to make. Paige initially make a decision for everyone that the whole boat should be sea foam green, but after discussing with a couple people, not everyone really wanted the whole boat to be one color. We first tried to imagine the boat all sea foam green with a different colored trim, but it was hard to find something that looked good. We then quickly decided that we would use the seafoam green as an accent and choose other colors for the boat. We decided to paint the majority of the boat electric blue, which is a pretty dark blue and accent it with sea foam green seats, rubrails, aft, midship frame, and the back of the boat. We also decided to do something that would make our boat “pop” a little more. The quarter knees and breasthook will be red and we’ll have a “rocker” hand sign on the back of our boat. I can’t remember when we started calling our boat “the rocker”, but it was probably when our boat had the ability to rock. The rocking became obnoxious and we then gave it the signature name, The Rocker (you must put up a ‘rock on’ sign with your hand when saying it). After we all carefully smoothed the boat with a small-grained sandpaper and cleaned the boat ( see all images because it was difficult to take pictures and paint), the rest of class, we painted our first coat of electric blue, seafoam green, and red on the inside of the boat. It was difficult at times because we were painting wet colors right next to each other and they would mix. This was because of our time crunch of one week left in the shop and we definitely wanted more than one applied coat. We had some areas that were just way too wet to paint next to because it was a guarantee that they would drip into each other, but Rihanna is going to the shop before our last week to touch up a couple things. This concludes my last blog post for the semester. Wish us luck as we float into the sunset in our Echo Bay Dory Skiff!



  34. #104
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Biddeford, ME, USA
    Posts
    14

    Default Paint Time

    At the beginning of class we each presented our final project on a craftsperson or boat builder from the state of Maine. I presented on a furniture maker named C. H. Becksvoort. Even though I was a little nervous to present, it was very interesting to hear about different peopleís work and how it relates to our boatbuilding experience. After presentations, we finally got to start the painting process. We started the class with sanding and then cleaning the boat to prep for the paint. Then we looked at the different color options and created our own color scheme. It was fun looking at the different colors and trying to figure out what colors went together and which parts of the boat we would paint each color. We finally decided on three colors: red, sea foam green, and dark blue. Having three different colors was a little intimidating because we didnít have a lot of class time left to paint, which meant we couldnít tape areas off where two different colors met. As a result, we had to do it free hand. It was a little difficult at first, but by the end we had figured it out and it is looking good. The biggest thing to keep in mind for next class will be to take into account drying time and not painting two different colors right next to each other at the same time so that the colors donít mix. Iím looking forward to putting the last few coats of paint on!

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Durham, Maine, United States
    Posts
    13

    Default Paint Day

    Today in class we were going to start painting the boat, but before we could start, the boat had to be softly sanded and the colors had to be chosen. For the colors we chose red, blue, and sea foam green. I had to attach some wood to the bottom of the seats so that they had more support and were less flimsy. Then after that I went to go and help paint the seats. The new pieces of wood, that I had just attached, made it a little more challenging than it should have been, but we got it done none the less. After the seats were painted I helped paint the actual boat itself. I had to use my long arms to reach some of the hard to reach spots. At one point we ran out of a paint for one color so some of the parts didn't get painted. All in all the boat is looking good and I can't wait to finish it next class.

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