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Thread: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    A cold but dry Saturday allowed me to get the table saw outdoors and I got the "Birds mouths" cut into the mainmast staves.



    And now with most of the parts assembly done, I spent a good part of the day rearranging the shell game that is my garage in order to make enough room to set up the building frame. The kit comes with the main parts of the building frame pre-cut, and the long pieces splice together with puzzle joints, so it makes it very easy to come up with a straight frame. Then the moulds slot right into precut slots in the frame, also super easy. I had to do almost no measuring to get the frame set up. Next step, to level it carefully.


  2. #37
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Quote Originally Posted by Larchmont Jim View Post
    Kudos to Clint Chase for conceiving such cool trad designs for amateur builders using modern materials. I kind of wish I had a Deblois Street Dory, the most awesome uber-traditional boat built in modern ply and epoxy. (It's about one order of magnitude cooler than the CLC NE Dory I do have).
    I really want to build a Deblois St. Dory.
    My Goat Island Skiff Project Photos:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/999065...7648295059621/

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    4 days of business travel last week, so no progress until the weekend. Saturday I glued up the scarfs in all the planks. The planks in the kit have very cool multi-level puzzle joints that make aligning the planks super-easy and provide a lot of gluing surface:



    Clint suggests using a string line to check the alignment of each plank. I did that for two of them, found they aligned well and the joints fit tightly allowing no play, so I didn't bother aligning any more. I would have had to glue one plank at a time to check the alignment. Being lazy and rushed, I just glued all the planks at once, in two stacks with plastic sheets in between each plank. Here is my gluing setup:



    Works great, saves a lot of time, and the joints almost all came out looking perfect, which would be this. Note that the puzzle joint is all hidden inside:



    But... dooh I used one plastic divider sheet that was a little too small, and two of the planks became one. Out came the heavy artillery (a 1" chisel and a mallet" and it had to separate the Siamese twin planks. Not good. Note to self: don't skip on the plastic sheets!! Because now I have some body -shop work to do on two planks:



    I figure I'm doing pretty well if after 6 weeks of working, this is my biggest fubar to date.

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    The other project this weekend was building a roller. I keep my dory on a floating dock at my local boat club. It's so light that I have been able to launch and retrieve it using just a cylindrical fender as a roller. I think that the CIY, which will take the dory's spot on the dock, will be too big for that. So a roller mounted at the edge of the dock is called for. With some scrap doug fir 2x4's that I had lying around, plus a galvanized grounding bar from Home Depot for the axle, I made this:



    The plan was in my head already and then I recently saw an article in Small Boats Monthly that gave a few hints on how to make one of these as well. A harcutting board from the kitchen gave its life to become what I hope to be low-friction bushings.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    If it happens again, its worth breaking out the heat gun to see if you can heat the epoxy enough to separate the wood before breaking out the chisel. Never had to do it with something on this scale, but I've been able to separate smaller epoxied joints with just a heat gun and a little force. Continued application of heat allows for using a scraper to scrape the wood clean and give it another go.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Heat gun... good one, I should have thought of that. That might have led to less destruction. Fortunately, not enough wood was ripped out to compromise the strength of the plan, and a little epoxy bondo fixed the problem:


  7. #42
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Tasks over the past couple of days: set up cradles for mast gluing, dry fit & clamp the mast staves,



    and mill the plugs that will go in each end of the mast during the glue-up. Masthead plug of oak:



    and plug for the foot of the mast made of sitka, eight-sided on the table saw. I had to glue it up from two pieces because I didn't have any single piece thick enough:


  8. #43
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Are you gluing tapers into the plugs? I might worry about a hard spot if the inner plugs are not tapered--do the plans talk about that?

    I know I've seen threads here on that somewhere. Never built a birdsmouth spar myself, so I'm just curious if that is necessary.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    The plans didn't call for tapering the staves on the foot end; the staves are straight for at least 6 feet. So the plug section for that end is straight also, no tapering required. The taper in the mast from the partner down to the mast step end will come from planing down the staves on the outside. I think it will be a good idea to taper the top 2 or 3 inches of the foot plug just a bit to relieve any potential "hard spot" at that end.

    The plug I cut for the masthead is only 7 inches long, and the amount of taper in the inside diameter of the mast over that length is small. Plus the plug is fairly loose fitting anyway, and will just be cemented in place with epoxy to fill the gaps in my amateur-level joinery (compounded by my el cheapo table saw which doesn't cut very accurate angles).

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Jim, I don't have a good picture of it (thought I did; can't find it...), but you might consider cutting a crown-type shape into the top of the bottom plug. This picture (not sure whose it is--sorry to the photog!) is in a square piece, but the idea is the same for an octagonal one:

    The idea is that then the plug doesn't create a hard point in the mast just above the partners. Four quick cuts on a band saw after you've shaped the plug would do it. I did the same on my mast, FWIW.
    Last edited by BrianMCarney; 02-16-2017 at 09:52 AM. Reason: Grammar...
    My Goat Island Skiff Project Photos:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/999065...7648295059621/

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    That picture came from this thread, which may be of interest generally:

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...irdsmouth-mast
    My Goat Island Skiff Project Photos:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/999065...7648295059621/

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Today we glued up the mainmast. Special thanks to Brian Carney, who made himself known to me via this forum and who lives just 5 miles from me, for graciously offering to help me with what is definitively a 2-man task. Brian has a Goat Island Skiff that he built so this task was a repeat for him.

    Since the staves were reasonably well milled, everything went together smoothly. Here are the plugs in each end of the mast. We also put a solid core in the mast where it will encounter the mast partner, complete with wedges cut out of it to give it a crown shape similar to Brian's post above and to match Clint's drawing. The plug in the masthead will be cut flush:



    Whereas the plug at the butt of the mast will be rounded and will become the mortise that sticks into the mast step:


  13. #48
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Three weekends away from home meant little progress, but I finish shaping and sanding the mast and got a coat of varnish on it. So nice to see what was just rough wood become something finished! Now it's time to set up the molds and get working on the hull.




  14. #49
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Looks lovely!
    My Goat Island Skiff Project Photos:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/999065...7648295059621/

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Woo-hoo, after 2 months of making parts, I'm finally starting to work on something that resembles a boat. This weekend was spent setting up the molds and bulkheads, and then gluing and filleting the ends and the middle. Specifically, the stem assembly to the forward bulkhead:



    , the daggerboard trunk to the middle bulkhead, and the aft bulkhead to the "sternposts" and the transom.

    It is quite ingenious how the strongback, molds and boat parts all go together. The two molds (where there is no bulkhead have come with this pre-cut right angle brace that makes getting everything square and level very easy:



    and the result is a nicely constructed mold/boat parts with all the bulkheads/frames already in place.



    Next step, the bottom and garboard planks!

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Looks really good Jim! And very familiar! I think the gussets for the aft bulkhead may go on the front of the strongback. Very interesting watching your progress. I am going to have Clint cut the spar timbers as I don't think my table saw skills and time would be an easy one for all of those.

    -Nick

  17. #52
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Eagle eye Nick, you are spot on on the gusset location! I took this photo before gluing everything, then I read the instructions carefully and they clearly state that the gussets go on the aft side of bulkhead #1 (fwd) and bulkhead #3 (amid) but on the forward side of aft bulkhead #5. I had all three of them wrong, so i moved them before gluing anything.

    HOWEVER, your eagle eye might also notice that the two stern posts which are supposed to have the already-attached cleats on the outboard sides, (ie insides of the side tanks) have them on the inboard sides here. I did not catch that, and the sternposts are now quite permanently epoxied into the wrong sides. So tonight's task is to cut and fit cleats on the "new" outboard sides of the sternposts. An annoying, but recoverable, error. I will also have some work to do later cutting down the height of the top inboard cleat by 1/8" with a rabbet plane to get it down to the height you are supposed to glue it into.

    In a further "doooh" maneuver, I glued in the daggerboard trunk, forgetting that I had not gotten around to attaching the specified hardwood side cheeks to it yet. Because I didnt have any of the right wood at hand when I assembled the trunk a month ago. I guess i'll apply those in situ...

    I'll be watching your progress as well. Who will launch first? When we get these things built we should have a Northeast CIY class rendezvous-- all 2 of us!

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    First screwup fixed -- attached additional cleats to outboard sides of stern posts. These will be twice as reinforced as is called for in the plans...


  19. #54
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    The wedges that hold everything tight while gluing can now be removed. A few raps with a chisel and then flush sawing with a Japanese pull saw do the trick. It's not beautiful, but will get faired and painted over anyway.




  20. #55
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Lookin' good!

    My Echo Bay's use the tab-n-lock system as well. One student/customer at WBS last summer wanted to varnish the outside of their boat. We plunged a router bit and cleaned out the slot and put in a wood colored epoxy and they were good to go with the varnish. In fact, their boat is one of the boat's of the year in Maine Boats Homes and Harbors.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  21. #56
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Hey Clint,

    i plan to keep that great big transom varnished, so i filled those slots with some wood-colored epoxy. But i was also thinking of just covering those two spots with wood onlays of some sort - maybe stars or compass roses. The bulkheads will just get painted.

  22. #57
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Tonight's extracurricular activity was cutting the holes in the tanks for the inspection ports. The drawings call for putting the 6" plastic circular inspection ports in the tank tops. But I didn't want plastic so conspicuously located in the boat (I plan to varnish the tank tops) and I wanted to be able to stow some long thin stuff for camp cruising (thermarest, camp stool, tent) inside the tanks. So I checked with Clint and he said it's fine to put the ports in the bulkheads.

    But the bulkheads are already mounted on the building frame. It would be really hard to get a decent cut with a saber saw. So I made a template on the bandsaw that could be mounted on the bulkhead and then I can use a router with a flush cut bit to "follow" the template. Added advantage, I only had to cut carefully one template... then got 4 identical holes.

    Here's the template -- on the left and the "hole" cutout on the right:



    Cutting big holes in your boat is kind of scary, but this method made it less dangerous to screw up. They came out pretty good, and they don't have to be perfect because the flange of the port will cover the edge of the cutout hole.

    Aft tanks:


    And forward tank:


    I think it would be easier if the bulkheads in the kit came with the holes already cut in them! Clint you should consider that. Or provide a CNC-cut template in the kit so the builder can use it to rout out their holes where they want them.

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Hi Jim, Nice work.

    It's a good suggestion to precut the holes on the kits and I do on a number, but then some folks want the holes in the tank top and others in the bulkhead. So I left the holes out on this one until I saw what people generally liked. I would put one in the forward and one in aft tank top. You will need three deck plates...which is fine. I agree on the precut pattern...good idea!
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  24. #59
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Lots of travel, for business and otherwise, has meant slow progress on the building lately.

    Before starting the planking, I thought it would be a good idea to make cardboard patterns of the molds that I can use to cut some cradles for when I turn the boat over. I did one of each of the two molds that don't become part of the boat, and the after bulkhead. Sure, the molds will still be available once I take the boat off the building frame, and I suppose I could use those to cut cradles out, but this way I can cut cradles in advance and have them at the ready. And of course the bulkhead won't be available to use for a pattern to cut a cradle, since it will be inside the boat, if I decide I need cradles at three different locations.


    Now, finally, on to the planking! Over the course of the past week I did get the bottom plank and the garboards on though. First the bottom plank, weighed down by a bunch of old tiles while the epoxy sets:



    And voila -- the bottom and garboards epoxied and filleted - sort of - to the frames, stitched and glued to each other, cut to length at the transom, stitches removed and joints sanded. Almost ready for glassing, but first I have a few screw holes to fill.


  25. #60
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    still here, very much enjoying your updates, and now the exciting planking bit. The method of using plank edge to edge and then lapstrake sides seems a really good solution to me.

  26. #61
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    The stitch and glue of the bottom panel to the garboards was familiar to me because that's the way CLC does it "Lapstitch" boats, including my Northeaster Dory. For a boat built on a frame/molds the importance of the stitches is much less, as the planks are held in pretty close contact by the planks temp screwed to the molds/bulkheads and you're not counting on the stitches to force the shape into the hull before gluing. It was really only necessary to hold the planks into vertical alignment in the spans between the frames. The advantage is it allows glassing of the bottom and garboards in one unit with glass going over the joint, which allows the plywood used to be thinner than otherwise. In fact Clint has spec'd 6mm plywood even for the bottom panel, which struck me as a bit light (the NE Dory uses 9mm for the bottom and garboards), but he says that with the glass on it, it's plenty sturdy.

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    [QUOTE=Larchmont Jim;5195186]Lots of travel, for business and otherwise, has meant slow progress on the building lately.

    Before starting the planking, I thought it would be a good idea to make cardboard patterns of the molds that I can use to cut some cradles for when I turn the boat over.



    Good Idea...I'll be doing cradles as part of future kits.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  28. #63
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    This week's business trip got cancelled, so I am actually making some progress at nights this week.

    Tonight's task was cleaning up all the epoxy fairing putty I had used to fill screw holes and wire holes -- a task made way too laborious because I had put too much of the stuff on and had lots of Shinto rasping and sanding to do. Followed by taping the glued seams between bottom plank and garboards.

    The kit instructions say to cut a strip of cloth off the 6 oz. fiberglass swath you're going to use to cover the whole bottom and use that, but I think that would lead to a real mess of fraying fibers. I got some 2-inch glass tape from Raka that has almost no selvage edge that would absorb epoxy and then have to be scraped off. This tape doesn't fray at the edges and is very easy to use. Seems to work well:


  29. #64
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    "Ahh, I love the smell of epoxy in the evening!" (Sort of a paraphrase from Apocalypse Now...) 6 oz glass cloth goes on next, onto the entire bottom panel and garboards.

    A quick once-over on the tape edges with a cabinet scraper took off the not-too-high selvage edges first. Then I put blue tape on the garboard edges exactly where the bevel will be cut, so that I can later cut the glass at the tape line with a boxcutter knife and remove the glass. That way I won't have to plane through it when beveling for the plank lap. My plane blade does NOT like glass or epoxy!

    I have heard two schools of thought on whether one should saturate the plywood first before laying on the glass. I learned it on my Pygmy kayaks as a 3 -step process: 1) roll saturation coat on bare wood 2) after that is no longer tacky but within 12 hours, lay on the glass and the first epoxy fill coat 3) come back within 12 hours and put in next fill coat. But I recently watched Eric Blake on an OffCenter Harbor video express a strong preference for doing it by laying glass on the clean wood and filling it with epoxy all in one, replacing steps (1) and (2) above. I did it that way here; for horizontal surfaces I think it works great, I got full saturation and it saved a lot of time. Not sure how well it would work on a vertical or near-vertical surface though.

    I'll roll on a fill coat in the morning while I can still get a chemical bond with the not-fully cured epoxy in the weave.


  30. #65
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Finally onto planking... cutting laps, cutting gains, and epoxying everything together. Cutting the laps is complicated by the flimsiness of 6mm plywood planks. You really have to use two hands with a block plane, one to hold the plane and the other to hold the back of the plane -- actually to squeeze the plane and the plank together-- as you move the plane along. Forget about using a #4 plane for this job. But okoume is soft so it's easy to plane, and the plys make it easy to calibrate the evenness of the bevel.

    The Stanley #78 rabbet plane makes easy work of the gains for the bow.

    I'm using a clamping batten and drywall screws into backing blocks to clamp the laps for gluing. The first one I did with a 1/2" thick spruce batten and the forward end came out with low spots between the molds and a less-than fair curve. For the second one, I used a 5/8" thick oak batten on the forward half of the boat... that did the trick and pulled the planks into a nice fair curve. The after end is less troubling for the planks and I only have one thicker batten so I still used the spruce batten on that. Here's the work in progress:



    You learn as you go. My first plank gluing job was a real mess of epoxy everywhere and sagging fillets. On the second one I used this gizmo that I found at the local hardware/chandlery store. What a great time-saver and quality improver over a big syringe or a pastry bag. You just fill it with your epoxy putty/goop and use it with a construction glue gun. When you're done, there's no real cleanup... just let whatever small amount of epoxy is still in the end and in the nozzle harden, and the next day push it out the back with a rod. You can see the clump of hardened epoxy that came out of this one. Now it's ready to use again. Almost as good as sliced bread!


  31. #66
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Planks are added at a ferocious pace... Tonight I finished fitting and gluing plank#4. Only one more pair of planks to go!

    Singlehandedly maneuvering 16 foot planks that are 6mm thick is tricky, and I managed to have one break along the puzzle joint. Not a big deal, some new glue and glass tape on both sides of the break did the job of fixing it, but I did lose a couple of days waiting for that repair to cure. Anyway the repaired plank is in place. Over the weekend I cut proper planking-clamping battens out of some oak, 3/4" wide by 5/8" thick, enough to glue two 16-foot planks at a time, and switched to using 3/4" plywood backing blocks to screw into. That combo has got the planks "pulling" into a nice fair curve. And I've figured out how to keep the backing blocks out of the squeezeout, to make cleanup on the interior easier.

    Here is plank #3 on:



    And then plank #4


  32. #67
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    I also convinced my 18 year old son to help with the plank gluing. It's phenomenally easier to get it right with 2 people. 2 people to position the plank = a lot less glue getting smeared around. 2 people clamping with one driving screws and one under the boat holding the backing blocks in place, works really well. My son has never been that interested in my building projects. Maybe that threat of not paying next year's college tuition if he didn't help me did the trick...

  33. #68
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Looks great, Jim. Love the aft shots...shows the boats fullness and bearing aft. Will make for easy launching of the trailer and perhaps even some planing surface when sailing hard on a broad reach!
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  34. #69
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Clint and Jim, is this build the first of the revised hull form? She has lovely lines. Really enjoying the build, Jim.

  35. #70
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    John, yes this is the MkII version. You can see she has a firmer bilge than the mkI. The pics are Jim Levang's built in Duluth, hull #1.

    Calendar Islands Yawl by Clint Chase, on Flickr

    Calendar Islands Yawl by Clint Chase, on Flickr
    Last edited by Clinton B Chase; 04-13-2017 at 02:18 PM. Reason: Info
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

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