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Thread: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

  1. #141
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Looks great Jim. Sorry we didn't get out together this summer.
    My Goat Island Skiff Project Photos:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/999065...7648295059621/

  2. #142
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Quote Originally Posted by Clinton B Chase View Post
    Also, in response to Tom, above, the boom is really not that low, it's just that the builders of #1 cut the mast short to get it to fit inside the hull. In fact, I have the mast drawn at 16 1/2'...it could be 16' so it can be gotten out of standard Eastern White Spruce stock. I think #1 the mast was cut below 16', but I don't recall how much less.
    Clint,

    yes, I had forgotten the mast was shortened on the prototype--thanks for the reminder. Another 6-8" inches of mast height vs. the prototype would make a big difference for sure. I think I'd still prefer a daggerboard, though, for the increased openness of the cockpit. It looks very inviting with no centerboard case in the way of the helmsman's seating.

    Lovely boat--I really like it. Of course, I really like the look of Drake, too. Maybe someday...

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  3. #143
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Quote Originally Posted by Clinton B Chase View Post
    Also, in response to Tom, above, the boom is really not that low, it's just that the builders of #1 cut the mast short to get it to fit inside the hull. In fact, I have the mast drawn at 16 1/2'...it could be 16' so it can be gotten out of standard Eastern White Spruce stock. I think #1 the mast was cut below 16', but I don't recall how much less.
    I wanted to follow up on the mast height issue I mentioned--Clint is completely correct. According to the text/captions of the review I wrote of the prototype boat, that mast measured 14' 11"--so, WELL under the designed 16' 6" height the plans specify. No wonder the boom felt low!

    Clint, I apologize if I have mislead people with my comments. They were relevant to that particular boat (the prototype), but NOT to the CIY design itself. I suspect with a 16' 6" mast it would have felt fine to me, even though I'm tall-ish (6' 2"). In fact, re-reading the SBM review article, I'm reminded of just how closely the CIY fits my own dreams for a perfect cruising boat.

    Hope that clears things up. I'll try to be more careful with comments in the future.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  4. #144
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    No worries, Tom.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  5. #145
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Since my last post on September 30, I have had to abandon any idea of getting the CIY in the water before the sailing season is over... The good side of that was it let the pressure off to be building, which allowed me to get a number of beautiful not-even-fall days on the water sailing my CLC dory and rowing my Dave Gentry "Ruth" wherry.
    Now that the docks are pulled from my boat club, the dory is on a trailer in the driveway, and the Ruth is sitting... well, on top of the CIY in the garage (note the Pygmy Arctic Tern hanging in the overhead -- this one-car garage is now a 3-boat garage:



    So the building progress has been miniscule. Next up was building the boomkin. The plans suggest you could use an ordinary closet hanging bar, which would be easy. I was intrigued by the elegance of John Hartmann's hollow boomkin on his Ilur, and while I'm not willing to go to the trouble of doing a birdsmouth as I think he did, I came up with a pretty easy method: I milled 2 pieces of ash to 5/8" x1 1/4", then cut a maybe 5/16" channel in each one to make a square hollow when they are put together. Here are the two pieces:



    And here they are gluing up. The rope in the middle was put there to be able to hopefully swab out any epoxy squeezeout



    Then I cut a "tenon" on the inboard end to about 7/8" square with the bandsaw, did the standard 8-siding and rounding of the outboard part, did some head-scratching compound angle cutting to make it fit the transom, and voila, a nice boomkin:



    The mizzen sheet will be led through the boomkin to a jam cleat mounted on the afterdeck. Here is the detail of where the "tenon" meets the square hole in the transom

  6. #146
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Quote Originally Posted by Larchmont Jim View Post
    Since my last post on September 30, I have had to abandon any idea of getting the CIY in the water before the sailing season is over...
    Looks awesome great job. I've just came to the same conclusion with my Campion build. I had really hoped to launch the same year the build started, but the weather is really starting to turn here and there just isn't any need to rush to get the boat in the water. I don't really want to get to used to the boat knowing that if I capsize, the water is cold enough to kill (I don't have a dry suit).
    From the looks of it, I'm just about where you are (finishing up the boomkin) and cobbling all the little bits and pieces together. I like you hollow boomkin arrangement, I originally planned on doing a birdsmouth, but got lazy and just glued up a solid piece. If I had known I wasn't going to launch, I would have taken my time and thought throw a method like yours. Nice work.

  7. #147
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    I think these boat projects are very intensive and are supposed to be FUN!!! So, Jim you made a great decision. The great thing is that you started and are almost there...many people don't even start and I am one. If I can settle into my business enough I will finally build a boat again for myself. I can't wait.

    I give myself credit for the hollow boomkin idea. John built his ILUR from my kit and I said, "you know what would be a great idea"...and he did it in spades. Jim, your idea takes it further...no need to go birdsmouth here. I plan to incorporate your idea! Thanks!
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  8. #148
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    It's fun for us lurkers to see a build chronicled. Sure is a pretty design, Clint.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  9. #149
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Here is a little more detail on the boomkin arrangement. The boomkin is cut square on the inboard part and fits through a square hole in the transom. It's actually a little larger than 1" square. The outside diameter of the round part came out at just over 1 1/4". It flexes a bit under a load, so I hope it is strong enough. But the mizzen is tiny, something like 18 sq ft, so it shouldn't pull very hard.

    It took a little careful chiseling to get the "shoulder" to sit flush to the transom:



    I cut a little socket for it to fit into, and epoxied onto the tank top:



    The boomkin is held in place by dropping two copper nails into holes drilled into the socket and the boomkin end. They are not very large nails, but they really shouldn't take any load -- the transverse and vertical loads are taken by the socket itself, and the tension on the mizzen sheet should pull the boomkin forward against the transom. So the nails only prevent it from loosening aftwards. They can be easily removed when it's time to unship the boomkin. (Got that idea from Geoff Kerr's video series on building a Caledonia Yawl on Off Center Harbor; he used that trick to hold the tiller into a mortise in the rudder. That series was invaluable for me to learn enough techniques and tricks to be well equipped for this build).

    A jam cleat screwed to the tank top holds the mizzen sheet which is reeved through the inside of the boomkin. Since the tank tops are thin (6mm) I screwed the cleat into a backing plate made out of some 9mm ply scrap and glued to the underside of the tank top.


  10. #150
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    With no crunch on to make a launch date now, I can do little details at my own leisure. Tonight's addition: tie-lines below the gunwales.

    I figured out with my CLC dory that one little drawback of glued lapstrake boats is that the hull has no place to tie lines into. No gaps between ribs and planks at the lap. So unless you build a spacered inwale, you've nothing to tie your binoculars, radio, knife etc. to. In my dory I ended up drilling some holes into the tops of the frames. I started with that idea here and then realized I could run a line through those holes instead and have a continuous line to tie or clip things into, all along the hull. I made some padeyes and glued them to the sheer plank, then ran a line through all that. It ties off to a cleat screwed to the underside of the quarter knee so I can put some good tension on it. I used traditional colored twist line which blends nicely with the wood:





    Clint says he designed the lazarette to fit a big fender that can be used as a beach roller. I found that, just by dumb luck, my Rocna 13-lb anchor fits perfectly into it - with about a half an inch to spare. This is truly fortunate because that anchor is a very odd shape and not something I would want kicking about in the boat where I could stumble on it.




  11. #151
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Great work! Thanks for documenting this so nicely. I'll be referring to this in the future for sure.

    Mike
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  12. #152
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    MY COMMENTS ARE IN BLOCK CAPS FOR SEPARATION NOT SHOUTING

    Quote Originally Posted by Larchmont Jim View Post
    ...

    PAD EYES/TIE LINE ARE A GOOD IDEA AND YOU DUNN A REAL WELL JOB OF IT!

    Clint says he designed the lazarette to fit a big fender that can be used as a beach roller. I found that, just by dumb luck, my Rocna 13-lb anchor fits perfectly into it - with about a half an inch to spare. This is truly fortunate because that anchor is a very odd shape and not something I would want kicking about in the boat where I could stumble on it.

    YES, ANCHORS NEED TO BE OUT OF THE WAY AND SECURE



    YOU MIGHT GIVE SOME THOUGHT TO LAYING A PIECE OF TRUCK MUD FLAP UNDER THE ANCHOR TO PROTECT THE HULL AS YOU ARE GOING DOWN THE ROAD. THE BOUNCING & JIGGLING WILL CAUSE THE HEAVY METAL TO ATTACK THE WOOD :-(
    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  13. #153
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Quote Originally Posted by swoody126 View Post
    MY COMMENTS ARE IN BLOCK CAPS FOR SEPARATION NOT SHOUTING
    I generally put the anchor in the car for trailering, along with just about everything else besides spars/oars.

    I've used lines under the gunwale for tie-ins on all my boats, too--works great.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  14. #154
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    The same comments about the anchor apply when using her in a chop.

  15. #155
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    I like the idea of a sturdy rubber mat under the anchor to protect the hull. I will also glue in some padeyes so that i can strap the anchor down tight so it doesn't bounce around while underway. And I think putting it in the car while trailering is a prudent idea. Thanks for the suggestions!

    Next up will be to install strap-down padeyes on the inside of the hull for securing drybags and fenders. I have found in my dory that strapping them down low and tight in the boat makes them good ballast and also good flotation if I should ever swamp. Even good things to sit on. Also since they are immobilized and not hard-edged, they help calm down the bouncing of the boat when towing without causing any wear or abrasion on the hull.

  16. #156
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    More details...

    I have found that webbing straps with plastic side-release buckles are the best way to secure gear into the bilge or the sides of the boat. Much easier to strap things down tight than with a line, no knots to tie, and can be released with one hand. So I made about 36 of these wooden strap padeyes:



    And after varnishing and/or painting them, I am busy epoxying them into key spots in the boat, like under the side benches...



    Where they are perfect for securing drybags:



    I've gotten all of the after ones in, still need to do up forward.

  17. #157
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    consider this method of securing gear STOLEN ;-)

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  18. #158
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Today's job was making a cap for the daggerboard trunk, to keep me dry while rowing. I looked for some pieces of wood around the shop that would work, and found some ash and oak that fit the bill.






    I'll have to decide whether to varnish it or paint it to match the hull and trunk.

  19. #159
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Looking good, as does your entire build!

    I vote paint for the cap.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  20. #160
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Just a suggestion, post 150 / 152 , how about a perforated rubber doormat cut to fit under the anchor, would keep it quiet while also permitting some ventilation and drying while underway

    Rick

  21. #161
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Great work Jim! I also built a hollow boomkin for my Fulmar after seeing John's build thread. I'm convinced there's no way my boat would have come out as nice without all the build threads and ideas I've found here. Thanks for posting and I'm going to borrow the pad eye idea for my next build.

    Mike

  22. #162
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    More fit-out details: tie down points in the forward part of the boat. The double padeyes allow me to strap something in the center and also stuff on the sides using the same padeye as one side of each lashing.



    It took a little trial and error to find where the daggerboard would sit nicely and out of the way, then a couple of padeyes and a strap keep it tied in nicely to the port side of the hull. Another strap secures the daggerboard into the trunk or (as seen here) the daggerboard trunk cap in place:



    I pondered what color to paint the daggerboard and decided that the only time you would see it was when it was stowed in the hull, so I painted it to match the inside of the hull. The other idea was that it would not scratch a different color paint onto the light-colored hull this way.

  23. #163
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    I like those padeyes! How did you glue them? Was it just epoxy and masking tape?

    Nice work!

    Mike
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  24. #164
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Yes, just epoxied in place. I used a chisel to remove the paint and glass where each padeye would make contact so that I would have a good wood to wood joint. Then some unthickened epoxy on each face. Then pretty thick epoxycellofil paste to stick them in place. If the paste is thick and sticky enough, it will hold them in place even without clamping or tape.

  25. #165
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Giving yourself the winter to add all these (very nice) finishing touches will pay off next spring.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  26. #166
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post
    Giving yourself the winter to add all these (very nice) finishing touches will pay off next spring.
    Yes, having time to dabble in all these little details is actually kind of nice. Come springtime all i will need to do is rig the sails and go.

  27. #167
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY



    I built a hollow boomkin for Marianita and have found that the exit for the sheet has a lot more friction than expected. I simply put a big round-over in the end, it is still a tight corner and in light air the boom doesn't swing as freely as I'd like. I am pondering whether it bothers me enough to retro fit a more slippery eye of some sort in there this winter.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  28. #168
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    I believe John Hartmann rigged a low friction end on his boomkin...perhaps delrin?
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  29. #169
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Clinton B Chase View Post
    I believe John Hartmann rigged a low friction end on his boomkin...perhaps delrin?


    My boomkin end was turned from a bit of hop hornbeam, Ostrya virginiana—locally called “ironwood” :




    My initial experiments on the bench, with the mizzen sheet exiting the boomkin without some sort of bushing allowed the sheet to saw into the softwood......the hornbeam is 4 seasons on, with no sign of wear. I believe Tim Yeadon used an UHMW plastic bushing as the end piece of his hollow boomkin on the Hvalsoe 18 prototype.....


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Last edited by John hartmann; 11-20-2017 at 08:46 AM. Reason: punctuation

  30. #170
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    John,

    I have studied your build log closely and got a number of good ideas from it. It really is a valuable resource. And the CIY is similar to the Ilur yawl in a lot of ways. I think of it as the illicit love child of when an Ilur got it on with a Goat Island Skiff... Clint, is that the genesis?

    GIS = flat bottom/hard chine, real easy to build; Ilur = big buxom hull, lots of narrow planks , uber-traditional; CIY = somewhere in between with a flat but narrow bottom panel instead of a keel, a lighter weight hull with less rounded bilges, simpler to build than an Ilur in terms of the number of planks and the amount of interior furniture.

    One of its appeals to me however was that Clint designed it to have a lot of the same functionality, and a similar layout, but in a lighter weight which should mean a more solo-manageable boat, which was appealing to me. (More manageable wrestling it on a beach and onto my floating dock, not necessarily sailing it.) And another difference is that Clint spec'd a lot of it in plywood parts where the Ilur calls for solid wood. So for example the sternsheets/lazarette cover and the side benches are ply -- a lot less patternmaking, planning, jointing and shaping.

    Additionally, I don't have the woodworking skill nor some of the tools you have to do the amazing details that you have done! So I've gone with the slightly easier but less elegant approach on some things. For example the boomkin I made was a simple box-section rather than birdsmouth, and I'm hoping that since I made the whole thing out of ash, which is reasonably hard, that the rounded over hole in the end will be hard and slick enough to handle the sheet going through it. We'll see...

    If I make it to SRR next summer maybe we can see how its speed stacks up to the Ilur and the Goat! I know that my CLC dory got eaten alive by Waxwing last summer (day 2, on the close reach across Blue Hill Bay to the Blue Hill Bay lighthouse at the end of the afternoon, you just walked right by us).

  31. #171
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    Jim, thanks for the kind words about the thread, and Waxwing....I’m glad my experiences are a helpful resource for other builders. Don’t underestimate your building skills—you are doing a great job with the CIY, and you’ve hit on a number of elegant solutions to many of the little choices that present themselves on a long and complex project.
    Maybe Clint can speak to the design ideas, but my own sense is that the Ilur was one of Vivier’s early sail and oar designs, and so a logical starting point as Vivier began to explore the capabilities of CNC kit production.....many of the newer CNC designs like the Calender Islands Yawl, or Vivier’s Kernic or Jewell seem to incorporate the stitch and tape “skillet” with glued lap topsides....a pattern I suspect may reflect the designers evolving sense of what the optimally efficient build program of a CNC kit should be.....
    By all means, bring this boat to Brooklin next summer!
    Last edited by John hartmann; 11-22-2017 at 08:54 AM.

  32. #172
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    Default Re: Calendar Islands Yawl build in NY

    The design genesis of the CIY is interesting. The design started as an 18'8" daysailer with a coaming and nearly 6'6" beam. That was before my love for sail & oar boating really kicked in...I was mostly a sailor, then rower, then found these boats that combined the two in a wonderful way. So when Christophe approached me and said, "Hey, man...can we find a boat as awesome as the GIS that I can still solo and sail fast but better in chop and row nicely and be as functional as the GIS without too much complexity?". I thought about it and wondered what would happen if, after scaling down the 18'8" model to 15 1/2' LOA, we might have something. Also, my first little boat that I built was a Shellback and I always thought a big Shellback would be awesome. A few years of working with Vivier had a huge, huge impact as did building a lot of boats, mostly with people. So the CIY was reinvented at 16' and the mkI was built by Jim Levang in MN. But after hearing some feedback and a little gut work, I decided to firm up the bilges and shuffle the interior, dropping a couple frames and having the aft quarters be buoyancy and the middle a lazarette. The firmer bilges gave some more displacement too, which is good. One thing about a light displacement 15 1/2' boat is when you load it up she loses too much freeboard. The firmer bilges I think will be a good thing for standing up to gusts, too. Hopefully it doesn't hurt light air performance much because that was one thing that I was surprised by in the launch of the first boat...it ghosted along very well....but the gusts were a bit much for the slack-ish bilges.

    Jim has been great in sorting out detail stuff and the other builder in PA, Nick, is a first time builder so that has been great to see that the CIY is doable for a first timer.

    John, I like the stitch and glue "skillet" term....been trying to think of a good one!
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

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