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Thread: The face of American Railroading

  1. #1
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    Default The face of American Railroading

    The EMD bulldog nose:



    The F-Unit, the diesel that did it, starting with the EMD FT. Steam locomotives were dead almost everywhere in America by the time this picture of Santa Fe's Grand Canyon passenger train was taken in 1961. The lead locomotive is an EMD F3A built in 1948.

    Jeff C

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Didn't think much of the marinised version, just an oversized 71 series. They, however converted fuel into low torque noise very well. BTW, fill up the oil and check the fuel (they sorta kinda leaked, just a bit)


    Dumah
    Duct tape can't fix stupid but it will muffle the sound

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Quote Originally Posted by Dumah View Post
    Didn't think much of the marinised version, just an oversized 71 series. They, however converted fuel into low torque noise very well. BTW, fill up the oil and check the fuel (they sorta kinda leaked, just a bit)


    Dumah
    Diesels had their foibles, but when compared to steam it was no contest--and EMD in particular was quick to respond when maintenance and reliability issues arose.

    Jeff C

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Never worked on them, huh?

    Dumah
    Last edited by Dumah; 01-22-2017 at 12:41 AM. Reason: large fingers small keys
    Duct tape can't fix stupid but it will muffle the sound

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Quote Originally Posted by Dumah View Post
    Never worked on them, huh?

    Dumah
    Actually I have worked on locomotives...mainly EMD switchers, but also a few ALCO 539 and 244 series locos. I've never worked on any marine engine.

    When it comes to railroad locomotives, a steam locomotive could generally pull any train it could start (assuming level terrain), as steam locomotives developed higher horsepower at speed, zbut diesel locomotives are completely different. With a diesel loco even a 1000 hp switcher could start almost any train, but road diesel consists need to be horsepower matched to the weight of a train to keep the train moving at speed. Also, diesel consists can be power matched to a train to eliminate or reduce the need for helper engines in mountainous terrain, which is why there are five units MUed together on this ATSF train.

    Jeff C

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    I remember when every little kid pushed one of those across the living-room floor.

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    In 1956 I was 10 years old. We rode the Super Chief from LA to Chicago, and the Pennsy to NY. Pullman all the way. 60 years later, I remember our porter's name was Mr. Grande. He's in my memory as one of the kindest people I've met. Cared for my ailing mom and 5 of us kids.
    Вещи меняются 6 ноября.

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Having worked on a lot of marinised loco engines, the ONLY North American make that I found both reliable and relatively simple to "service" were Fairbank Morse 38D8 1/8. The only curve was removing the upper crank to pull liners through most of the engine. Much prefered German and Scantinavian machinery, seemed to be better engineered and certainly much better quality. The Alcos I worked on had copper head gaskets making retorquing a regular maintainence job, as anyone riding most British motorcycles will attest. My Norton was thus until I replaced the copper with an after market composition head gasket. Pardon my bias, but experience has taught me this.

    Dumah
    Duct tape can't fix stupid but it will muffle the sound

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    IMG_1614.jpg

    Jeff C

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Guy Clark wrote a song about it . Here's the Cash version.

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    IMG_0787.jpg


    Jeff C

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    GM, F- Unit ?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/EMD_F-unit

    (I had a GMC cab-over truck that looked very much like that except 2 headlights)

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Last year we did Vancouver-Seattle, Seattle-Chicago and Chicago-LA with Amtrac.
    Loved every minute of those trips.
    I once thought I was wrong, but I was wrong, I wasn't wrong.

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Quote Originally Posted by leikec View Post
    that's a Delaware & Hudson Alco PA diesel. Originally built in 1948. Was Santa Fe #60L, sold to the D&H and renumbered #17 in 1967
    I rather be an American than a Republican.

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    GM, F- Unit ?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/EMD_F-unit

    (I had a GMC cab-over truck that looked very much like that except 2 headlights)
    No, EMD E7 (A). The photo was taken in Plymouth MI in August, 1964
    I rather be an American than a Republican.

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/EMD_E-unit

    "The E7 was introduced in 1945, and became the best selling E model. It had the improved 567 “A” engine, and the F style “bulldog nose”.

    I wonder who the designer of that particular GM style was.

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    My Lionel Trains as a kid ( Mid 60's vintage) were that engine, though in a slate blue.

    Cool thread.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/EMD_E-unit

    "The E7 was introduced in 1945, and became the best selling E model. It had the improved 567 “A” engine, and the F style “bulldog nose”.

    I wonder who the designer of that particular GM style was.
    Nobody knows—the eventual bulldog nose originated as a modification to earlier passenger locos such as the E5 and E6, which were themselves of disputed origin. The Electromotive Corporation, a predecessor of EMD, built six EA passenger locomotives for the B&O Railroad, and these locomotives had a futuristic looking streamlined “shovel nose” that was in turn influenced heavily by both the Pullman-Standard Co UP M-10000 and the Budd Co Pioneer Zephyr.
    Some people have credited EMD’s Dick Dilworth (designer of the EMD GP7) with the final bulldog nose design, but he never took credit for it.

    The most likely answer is that it was the end result of a group design aimed at modifying the earlier shovelnosed E-unit front into an easier to build, stronger design with better visibility.

    Jeff C

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Thank you, I suspected corporate "group design" but wanted it to be Loewy or a contemporary.

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    This is an engine from the old Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes Railroad that served a grand hotel in the western mountains of Maine. It was a narrow gauge line.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_...Lakes_Railroad




    These "ghost trains" are left in the North Maine Woods at Eagle Lake. They shuttled logs along a 12 mile section of track for a few years.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eagle_...ranch_Railroad

    Last edited by Fitz; 08-12-2018 at 07:06 AM.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Does anyone have a photo of the Pennsylvania S1 running, the biggest, fastest passenger locomotive ever built, 6,4,4,6?

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    There's Raymond Loewy...


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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Had some memorable train rides when I was young. My first trip to the US east coast was by train, from Ogden, Utah, with one change at Chicago, and thence to Wilmington, Delaware (they split the train north/south in Pennsylvania during the night). I spent a lot of time up in the dome.





    On the return trip, there was a boat-tail club car at the end of the train with a piano, and I had a rousing jam session (Hallelujah!) with a gospel group from Chicago, headed to Oakland for a revival.



    On another trip, I rode the California Zephyr to Oakland, crossing Donner Pass at sunrise.

    That series of passenger coaches was steam-heated, and the railroads had to attach steam generators to their diesel engines, which was explained to me by a conductor, who said it was the last year for the classic domeliners.
    We're merely mammals. Let's misbehave! óCole Porter

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Quote Originally Posted by leikec View Post
    Nobody knows—the eventual bulldog nose originated as a modification to earlier passenger locos such as the E5 and E6, which were themselves of disputed origin. The Electromotive Corporation, a predecessor of EMD, built six EA passenger locomotives for the B&O Railroad, and these locomotives had a futuristic looking streamlined “shovel nose” that was in turn influenced heavily by both the Pullman-Standard Co UP M-10000 and the Budd Co Pioneer Zephyr.
    Some people have credited EMD’s Dick Dilworth (designer of the EMD GP7) with the final bulldog nose design, but he never took credit for it.

    The most likely answer is that it was the end result of a group design aimed at modifying the earlier shovelnosed E-unit front into an easier to build, stronger design with better visibility.

    Jeff C
    My father worked at EMD and retired as Regional sales manager after 44 years at GM. Tom Dilworth was a close family friend and used to commute with my father from Hinsdale to LaGrange EMD for years. I worked at the same plant for summers and 10 years after Navy service in the traction motor/alternator test dept. Worked on the famous UP DD-40 dual engine units which EMD built in the 70's.

    Cheers Mike

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    My father worked at EMD and retired as Regional sales manager after 44 years at GM. Tom Dilworth was a close family friend and used to commute with my father from Hinsdale to LaGrange EMD for years. I worked at the same plant for summers and 10 years after Navy service in the traction motor/alternator test dept. Worked on the famous UP DD-40 dual engine units which EMD built in the 70's.

    Cheers Mike

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading



    Jeff C

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Of course, if we widen this up, to make it the face of railroading.... we get the Te3, with around 6,800 units made.

    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    American railroading had fingers overseas. Over 2,100 Russian-designed locomotives were built in America

    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip-skiff View Post
    Had some memorable train rides when I was young.
    Me too. Mom and I would go visit grandma ...



    I wasn't kidding about California being ruined ...

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Quote Originally Posted by on the border View Post
    Me too. Mom and I would go visit grandma ...



    I wasn't kidding about California being ruined ...
    Fabulous train. Orange... that's a bonus.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    But if your loco isn't orange.... whack an orange bike next to it



    Some synchronicity....

    "63" started service 63 years ago.... same month I was born.

    The Commonwealth Railways Diesel Locomotive NSU63 was built by theBirmingham Railway Carriage and Wagon Company for use on the narrowgauge Central Australia Railway (CAR) and North Australia Railway (NAR).The diesel-electric locomotive commenced service on the CAR in July 1955and was transferred to the NAR in 1956.Both the NAR and CAR were significant in opening up the hinterland areas ofthe Territory and had a direct impact on the mining and pastoral industries inthe regions along the lines.

    Both railways also played a significant role duringWWII and the post war era.The NSU63 is significant to the Territory for its association with both railways.The locomotive was one of five NSU Class locomotives to operate on the NARand is the only remaining one of its type located in the Top End.

    The NSU63 is highly valued by a sector of the Territory community devoted topreserving the remnants of the NAR. At a broader level the object is valued bythe community as a tangible link to a crucial part of the Territory’s railwayhistory
    Last edited by The Bigfella; 08-13-2018 at 06:50 AM.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

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    Default Re: The face of American Railroading

    Do you guys double-stack containers on your trains?



    Ooh.... orange

    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

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