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Thread: Michael Storer's Oz Goose

  1. #36
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    Nov 2001
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    Default Re: Michael Storer's Oz Goose

    On the other end of the scale is the Australian Scow moth, now superseded by hydrofoil boat. But in its highest form of evolution this 11ft boat with 85sq ft of sail and hullweight of around 40 lbs (in plywood) ...



    Would consistently outperform the more conventionally shaped Contender in champion of champion regattas (best two boats of each class compete against each other in Oz in the '80s). This is despite the "more conventional" hullshape of the Contender and its impressive stats of 16ft with 120 sq feet of sail. Basically fast boats do not look like this any more.
    But the skiff type Moths eventually proved faster before the transition to foiling. In any case, speed in a one-design class isn't as important as good handling and close competition.

    What is the advantage of the boats being wall-sided? I should think a little flare would give the crew more leverage for hiking.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Default Re: Michael Storer's Oz Goose

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    But the skiff type Moths eventually proved faster before the transition to foiling. In any case, speed in a one-design class isn't as important as good handling and close competition.

    What is the advantage of the boats being wall-sided? I should think a little flare would give the crew more leverage for hiking.
    I'm naturally inclined toward development classes where variations can be tried and the optimum performance found by groups over the passage of time.

    I'm sure you are similar. I posted an article with lovely hand drawn drawings of the development of C-Class cats - all the significant boats nicely rendered and it is easy to see the changes in design.

    I'm sure you are the same. And our job is optimising boats after all.

    I don't think the boat matters so much.

    I'm sure that we could both do a better job on the Opti, but it is popular and brings out good sailors almost despite its design.

    What is more important is the response of the boat. Whether good sailors find the Oz Goose interesting to sail. That it accelerates when you do the right thing, turns well, gets upwind and hopefully can get up to higher speeds reaching and running. Which it does.

    The goose is a nicer boat to sail than an opti. Sails best with one, only very slightly worse with two (well sailed two person boats can compete quite well with one person boats).

    It carries three adults for teaching - or will in most countries - or 2 adults and some kids.

    And there is zero complicated explaining in the building - people "get it" easily. At boat shows we have had the Oz Goose next to the GIS which is pretty and curvy. The GIS is good to get people over and looking at our stand and gets experienced sailors onto the stand. But normal people then walk over and want to talk about the goose - they understand it and they want to talk about it. It feels like it is "in their league".

    Also the straight sides stake a claim of being different. Leading to lots of interested questions. And from the more experienced sailors they are trying to handle the paradox that putting good foils and a good rig (in terms of setup and gust response) on a box that is reasonably light creates a boat that sails well.

    I was a disbeliever when I first saw the 8ft ducks online with the rectangular planform, "That cant' work" but got involved because it was growing sailing. Then when we completed properly designed and detailed versions we found they sailed properly and were fun to sail. And other experienced sailors did too.

    And all were amused by the seeming paradox that the shape sailed quite well, had good response and feel and few vices and was a box.

    Flare makes it normal.

    "Nothing to look at here, move on please".

    There are advantages, as one person said, to being "a kitchen drawer with superior sailing qualities"

    Best wishes

    MIK

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Michael Storer's Oz Goose

    I'd sailed a Bolger Brick before the PDR came out, so I wasn't at all surprised at how they sailed. Bolger always liked more rocker than seemed reasonable to anyone else, though.

    I maintain sailing is a sensual sport, so how the boat feels matters more than ultimate speed. If speed were the objective, I could easily go faster in most forms of transportation.

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Australia
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    Default Re: Michael Storer's Oz Goose

    We have actually assembled a Goat Island Skiff and a Goose in front of boatshow crowds a few time.

    People stand with furrowed brows as the GIS goes together and all those flat panels turn into a curvy pretty boat. We tend to get questions from a more experienced group.

    But with the Oz Goose assembly they cluster in groups and talk while watching carefully and look relaxed. Their questions come more easily "does it sail".

    While the Goat looks fast from the beginning.

  5. #40
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    Australia
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    Default Re: Michael Storer's Oz Goose

    Quote Originally Posted by tink View Post
    [FONT="]ME - I think this is all very true. At my club for many it is all about the winning and some people chop and change classes to give themselves the best chance of winning. A skilled sailor can probably win in most boats but having the right boat for your weight is a key factor. I moved to the Streaker because I am top of the weight limit and would like to be the weight that is optimal for the Streaker. My race results are improving as a get closer to that weight, currently (well before the holidays) half way there. There have been attempts to have equalising systems, movable racks etc, but they never seam to catch on because people actually donít want to be equal they want and advantage - perceived or real.

    How sensitive to weight is the goose?
    [/FONT]
    We are starting to know that Tink.

    The geese have been racing regularly and are starting to attract some good sailors.

    It was nice being usually at the head of the pack for a couple of years - but I think that seems to be over.



    So ... there are a number of sailors that I would say are as capable (or more capable) at keeping racing dinghies going fast in the fleet.

    A couple of times we have had a mix of singlehanded geese and two handed geese racing together. This is something we will keep going. Never separate the fleet.



    At the Nationals Peter Capotosto won. He sailed the first day singlehanded when his crew didn't turn up. Winds were very light. I had a crew in my boat and we were pretty well neck and neck when both two up.

    In the light stuff when he was singlehanded we were right on his tail for most of the races.

    My experience was with windward leeward courses there is almost no difference in speed.

    The racing last month was in very light winds (2 to 5kn). The two fastest boats were Peter (alone) and me with crew. I kept making major foul ups in my racing - getting tangled with other boats, getting the course mixed up a couple of times. Each time these setbacks were quite major.

    My crew and I managed to work our boat back into contention in almost all the races, within shooting distance of Peter.



    He never made the mistake we needed to get past him ... but we were right there waiting ... and waiting ...

    ... Oh those endless light wind downwinds


    s
    The blue boat we were sailing had the reputation of being the slowest in the fleet (several crews swap boats regularly as a proportion of loaner boats are allocated on the day) because it is pretty heavy and the paint was put on with a thick nap roller.

    My suspicion is that there will be a significant difference in single handed vs two handed speed if there is high medium and strong wind power reaching.

    But most modern windward leeward courses don't really allow that possibility very often.

    MIK
    Last edited by Boatmik; 06-12-2018 at 05:22 PM.

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