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Thread: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

  1. #36
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    Larchmont, NY USA
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Hi Brian,

    You are right down the road. I sail, row and kayak out of Horseshoe Harbor Yacht Club in Larchmont. I recognize the Glen Island launch ramp in your build log photos. I was actually out on the Sound today in the kayak, it was drop-dead gorgeous.

    If you are game i might take you up on the offer for some help... specifically on gluing up the birdsmout mainmast, whcih definitely looks like a 2-man job. I'm building all my spars before i take up the whole garage with the boat hull. Its a small 1-car affair.

    I'll let you know when i get to that stage.

    My email is jim.allen@morganstanley.com

  2. #37
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Good eye Jim! I've got a half-built SOF kayak in my garage, but it's not exactly seaworthy yet. That is of course Glen Island. (Sorry to thread-jack Philly; I'll email Jim and we'll take this out of your thread).
    My Goat Island Skiff Project Photos:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/999065...7648295059621/

  3. #38
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Haven't updated this in awhile but progress is coming along nicely now. Here are the bulkheads, stem and transom after receiving a few preliminary coats of System Three epoxy.


  4. #39
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    Dec 2016
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    This is my novel idea for weighing down the lamination of the daggerboard. 5 layers of plywood glued at the same time. Seemed to work fine. Maple slabs came from a tree we took down a year ago.


  5. #40
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Daggerboard after planing. Didn't think about not planing the portion that will stay in the trunk. That could've stayed square. Lower photo shows after coats of epoxy containing graphite powder. Major learning experience. Tried to coat one final time and hang it from the ceiling to cure. The wire broke and fell into a pile of sawdust and shavings while freshly wet. Then propped it against the workbench while drying. Didn't realize that the cured epoxy would break the concrete it was sitting on and keep a chunk attached to the bottom.


  6. #41
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Gluing trim on the daggerboard trunk. Interior also lined with graphite impregnated epoxy.


  7. #42
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Gluing the stem to the fwd bulkhead. Was a novel approach to keep all surfaces correctly aligned and in contact but it seemed to work well enough.


  8. #43
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Stern assembly after gluing up.




  9. #44
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    This almost looks like the reverse of the usual method of building the hull and then putting the the other bits inside of it. Instead you hang things in place and then wrap the hull around them.

  10. #45
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    The usual method is now to build a boat this way...so much more efficient! It's ho wmost smart boatyards are doing it, I think.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  11. #46
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Dryfitting the garboard after the bottom had been glued.


    Fully glued up bottom and garboards. It's starting to look like a boat!!

  12. #47
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Finished gluing the starboard side sheer strake this morning. Happy to be making progress. This is a decidedly less exact format than I was expecting. I foresee lots of filler and sanding, particularly on the transom. Was planning on leaving varnished, but I don't see that happening now. Paint it will be.

    Other than that, super happy with the progress. Now I need to attach the rubrails, skeg, outer stem and then flip it. I think I'll finish out the interior in the basement and then move to the garage when it's time to paint. Or would finishing the bottom completely, paint included, be best to do while it's upside down? Spoke with a local lumber yard that has clear douglas fir in tongue and groove format that's 1x4, but really measures 3/4" x3". I think I may go that route and rip the tongue and groove off for the rubrails. The outer rail is 3/4" x 1 1/2" and the inwale is 5/8" x 1 1/4". That's a lot of waste but may be easier than hacking up some weird 2"x8". I don't have a thickness planer and was planning on ripping or resawing on my bandsaw.

    Any suggestions for easiest usage of wood for the rubrails and inwales? My understanding is that the big box store 2x4's and such, even choice ones, won't be as good. Any arguments in that direction? The longest piece I can fit in my car is 8' and the boat is just under 16' so my assumption was 2 8' lengths with a scarf as described in the assembly guide.

    Thanks for any help or contributions anyone may have!

    -Nick



  13. #48
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Two 8' boards won't yield a 16' rail after scarfing. More like 15'6" depending on the length of the scarf. So if you can't get 10' boards, you'll have to think about two scarfs to get to 16'
    I used the edges of 2x10s or 2x12s for my rails (on a goat). They worked great. With the T&G you'll be paying for tongues and grooves that you're cutting off anyway. You have to resew them, and I had a good table saw with a fence for that purpose, but you're talking about ripping the T&G anyway.
    With the dimensions you quote, you might think about the "premium pine" or some similar finish board from the big orange box or someplace similar. They sell them in 8' and 10' lengths, and in 1x1, 1x2 and 1x3 dimension. They're generally straight, knot-free, attractive wood.
    My Goat Island Skiff Project Photos:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/999065...7648295059621/

  14. #49
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    So, I made a few mistakes and need some help. I decided to form the outer stem on the boat as this is the only one I'm planning on making. However, there were no SS wood screws available so I used #8 3" screws in order to have some thread to bite the stem and have the plywood pads work effectively. I know it's a bit of a hot mess when put together, but I'm hoping to salvage this piece. Having hand screws would've been a lifesaver, but I didn't have them and didn't get them. Here's where the problems start, though. When removing the screws in reverse order, several of them snapped off inside the outer stem. I thought the clearance hole was plenty large but I forgot to wax the screws before driving them in. As they're not SS, does this necessitate removal of all pieces of metal from both inside the inner and outer stems? I know there's enough wood to gouge around them and grab the top of a screw with pliers, I just would like to move on if there won't be any major long term repercussions. At the bare minimum, I need to remove them from the outer stem before shaping it as they're in the bottom end of the piece where the most material will be sawn from. Any advice would be most helpful. I'd even consider fabricating another piece if necessary rather than salvage this one.

    Any help would be great!

    -Nick



  15. #50
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Is the lamination stuck to the inner stem by the screws?
    I don't think you need to make a new stem. It would be good to get the screws out and fill the holes with epoxy. Also would be good not to gouge more than you need to.
    My Goat Island Skiff Project Photos:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/999065...7648295059621/

  16. #51
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Apply heat to the screws using a bolt heated with a gas flame, hold it in vice grips then press against the screw head, if you grind to a point you can avoid burning the wood.. When the screw heats the epoxy will soften and you will be able to back them out. I had a similar problem but one of the screws broke, to get it out I made a long "hole saw" by cutting tiny if rough teeth in a length of stainless tubing about 1/4'' diameter ( car radio aerial) in my drill. I was able to cut a neat hole down around the broken screw then glue in a dowel to fill the hole. It worked well.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  17. #52
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Thank you for the "hole saw" suggestion. I think that'll work. I'll give it a go and see how it works.

    -Nick

  18. #53
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    So, I was able to remove the piece from the boat, but when I tried to shape it on my bandsaw, it completely delaminated. Plan B was to create a jig to use and it worked much better. Unfortunately I don't have a photo of the piece on the jig, but it gets clamped from one end of the jig around to the other. Seemed pretty straightforward for this first-timer.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Have moved on to patch up all the little holes and gaps on the bottom, sanded and applied 3 coats of laminating epoxy.




  20. #55
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    After sanding the bottom, it was time to turn the boat over. I can't believe how excited I was to do that. As my wife and kids returned from their day out of the house, I excitedly brought each of them down to check out the progress.

    Moving on to the next step of creating the knees and breasthook and installing the inwales. Have already found a few mistakes, for example, the "horn" on the knee on the port side, not having long grain in the longitudinal direction, snapped off when dry fitting the inwale. Not a huge deal as I don't believe it truly maintains mechanical rigidity through that small piece. I'm imagining that 15' of glued wood and glued into the knee will suffice for the intended stiffening.



    The fitment of some of these parts is not to the level I was hoping. There are just so many complex angles to contend with and fitting with hand tools makes it difficult. My original intention was to keep the knees, gunwales, inwales and breasthook bright, but now, after seeing what I'm able to accomplish in a reasonable timeframe and not re cutting pieces that aren't perfect, I foresee filling gaps, sanding and painting the entire boat. With every step I realize that paint would likely look the best. Any insight into choosing what gets varnish vs. paint?



    If I had more clamps, I'd glue up the other side, as well. Next step will be sealing the after tank tops after some filleting. I foresee more filleting around the bulkheads, as well. While dry fitting the inwales and cutting the notches, I inadvertently broke the glue bonds between them and sheer strake. I'm assuming a fillet on each side of the bulkhead will mend that?



    Anyway, I'm happy to be making progress. Not sure what the launch date may turn out to be, but I'm trying to go at a pace that I enjoy and not feel pressed by any specific date. Ideally it's within this season, but if not, that the way it is.

  21. #56
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Nick, It looks like the rubrails, breasthook and stem were installed "proud" of the top of the sheer strake which means you could shave and sand that all down to be flush with the sheer. Then you can prob. varnish. That is a typical approach whether building kit or from plans only.

    And yes, use EZ-Fillet to back fill gaps and create some fillets around the bulkheads. The small or medium sized fillet stick precut in the kit should work.

    We can talk more offline.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  22. #57
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Progress has been picking up since my kids are back in school. The side benches, rowing thwart and tanktop are fitted and getting prepped for gluing and filleting.
    I fitted the side benches with a 3/4" D. Fir cleat but it bent when I sat on it, and I'm not a big guy. So, I had some oak 3/4" x 1" stock that I glued as a support instead. Then I notched the after cleat and the side bench knee for guaranteed support. I'm sure I'll be able to stand or drop something on it without any issues ever. Maybe added a few ounces in the process.

    The mizzen foot is a little Ugly but that's fine, it'll be hidden.

    The rowing bench didn't sit flush with the top of the daggerboard trunk so I cut a little piece of DF to go in there and she'll sit square and nice now.

    Anyway, i'm happy to be able to follow Larchmont Jim's build as he's got much more experience than me and is thankfully a bit ahead of me in the build. So, lots more to learn and do, but she's getting there!

  23. #58
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Working on the parts for the rudder. Used some interesting maple I had laying around for the handle. If it doesn't hold up, it'll be easy to replace. I already carved it a bit too slim for my preference, but I'll let it play out.


    Shot of the designed support for the daggerboard trunk.


    Eye bolt for the stem. It seems a bit small to my eyes. Any opinions about that? I intended to install before gluing up the tank top on the bow but realized at the last moment that the brass half-round would have holes that need to be aligned with. So, I'll hold off until the end, figure out which hole will house the bolt and drill it out from there.


    I'd cut the holes for the deck hatches prior to installation and also prior to measuring the placement of the mast partner pad. As a result, it has the corners cut off. Thankfully, I can still reach an arm into the bow to put the nut on the eye bolt so there was no rush there.


    Closer up of the mast partner and mast step. The way it lined up relative to the bulkhead, I may need to change the placement of the gate by 1/8". Or, since I have yet to make the masts, maybe figure how to make them a tad larger there and jigger the hole to fit snugly and not bang around. That's a bit down the road, however.

  24. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhillySailor View Post
    Working on the parts for the rudder. Used some interesting maple I had laying around for the handle. If it doesn't hold up, it'll be easy to replace. I already carved it a bit too slim for my preference, but I'll let it play out.


    Shot of the designed support for the daggerboard trunk.


    Eye bolt for the stem. It seems a bit small to my eyes. Any opinions about that? I intended to install before gluing up the tank top on the bow but realized at the last moment that the brass half-round would have holes that need to be aligned with. So, I'll hold off until the end, figure out which hole will house the bolt and drill it out from there.


    I'd cut the holes for the deck hatches prior to installation and also prior to measuring the placement of the mast partner pad. As a result, it has the corners cut off. Thankfully, I can still reach an arm into the bow to put the nut on the eye bolt so there was no rush there.


    Closer up of the mast partner and mast step. The way it lined up relative to the bulkhead, I may need to change the placement of the gate by 1/8". Or, since I have yet to make the masts, maybe figure how to make them a tad larger there and jigger the hole to fit snugly and not bang around. That's a bit down the road, however.
    Good you are plugging along! C/B trunk... Um seems like the board will easily lever the trunk side to side. Or will there be a thwart on top later in the build? Maple tiller, if it's too light you could easily laminate sides to it to make it much stronger with a hardwood like ash.
    Carry on!

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  25. #60
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Denise, you make some good points. The c/b trunk does have a thwart on the after 1/3 and the aft end is glued to a bulkhead. It's rock solid, at least as it sits in my basement. I suppose we'll see once we get sailing and have some forces exerted on it. If the handle is too light, I think I'll just cut another one. I have a big piece of doug fir that would work fine.

  26. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhillySailor View Post
    Denise, you make some good points. The c/b trunk does have a thwart on the after 1/3 and the aft end is glued to a bulkhead. It's rock solid, at least as it sits in my basement. I suppose we'll see once we get sailing and have some forces exerted on it. If the handle is too light, I think I'll just cut another one. I have a big piece of doug fir that would work fine.
    There's a place in Bucks County called Bryan's Farm, he tells me he has Ash out the wazoo. It's a great wood for things like tiller handles because of its flexibility over break ability. Invariably people argue that ash rots easy but who's going to take a boat that they built out of plywood and Lord knows how many hours of Sweat Equity and leave it out in the weather.
    It's of course a different lumber requirement for boats that are in the water all year round.

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  27. #62
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Denise,

    Bryan's Farm is great. I've been there to get a chunk of wood awhile back. Since I've needed oddball stuff like Douglas Fir since, I've not been up there. I was considering laminating pieces together to a jig, not unlike how the outer stem was made. Already I'm liking what I've already begun less and less. It's pretty weak. You're right, I'm already wondering how to make a cover for this boat to keep is under wraps, especially considering that the mast will be longer than the entire boat. Maybe a storage A-Frame over which the cover will lay? I know my boat won't be the first to address that concern, but that and the boom tent are issues to get sorted out at the end.

    Thanks for your input!

  28. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhillySailor View Post
    Denise,

    Bryan's Farm is great. I've been there to get a chunk of wood awhile back. Since I've needed oddball stuff like Douglas Fir since, I've not been up there. I was considering laminating pieces together to a jig, not unlike how the outer stem was made. Already I'm liking what I've already begun less and less. It's pretty weak. You're right, I'm already wondering how to make a cover for this boat to keep is under wraps, especially considering that the mast will be longer than the entire boat. Maybe a storage A-Frame over which the cover will lay? I know my boat won't be the first to address that concern, but that and the boom tent are issues to get sorted out at the end.

    Thanks for your input!
    That's funny I've not even been to Bryan's Farm even though I know of it and talked with them on the phone. Bow roof and A-frame storage Outdoors works fine until there's a storm. the wind has actually lifted my canoes up from the rack!

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  29. #64
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    There's a place in Bucks County called Bryan's Farm, he tells me he has Ash out the wazoo. It's a great wood for things like tiller handles because of its flexibility over break ability. Invariably people argue that ash rots easy but who's going to take a boat that they built out of plywood and Lord knows how many hours of Sweat Equity and leave it out in the weather.
    It's of course a different lumber requirement for boats that are in the water all year round.

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Amen, I have really developed an appreciation for Ash. I spec it for a lot of parts in my kits, particularly rubrails, tillers, and other areas out of the bilge and in clear air. Bends great, glues, great, and looks great under varnish.

    I would like to remind anyone following this thread, that this is Nick's first boat! And I think he is doing very well.
    Clinton B. Chase
    Portland, Maine

    http://tinyurl.com/myboats

  30. #65
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    I used ash for most of the varnished wood bits on my First Mate with the exception of the spars and seats: tiller, rudder rod handle, cleats, rubrails, front coaming, and centerboard case cap. It looks great, is easy to work with, and has given my no issues. My boat is garaged and trailer sailed.

  31. #66
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    Making some slow progress. Fitted the rudder and stock, although the rudder is off here. Went on easily enough. Fitting the pintle bracket to the stock did require a bit of shaping. Wasn't crazy about the top of the stock so rounded it off. The tagline for the rudder may lay on the gunwale, but I think I prefer this more low key version.



    Fitting the cedar floorboards. Just dryfit now but need to clean them up, oil them and put them back together. I already bought a hinge for my "foot" that'll hold up the platform when in the sleeping platform position so I'll probably go that route. Also need to fit the underseat cleats to hold up the floor. They're cut and shaped, just getting a coat of epoxy before gluing up.



    My daughter found a new use for the mast partner. Don't think this'll work out too good in the long run but may keep her in place for long rowing sessions.


  32. #67
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    Default Re: First Build - Chase Small Craft Calendar Islands Yawl

    nice job,good continuation

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