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Thread: Zuri

  1. #106
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Thanks Peter - should be soon.

    All prepped and ready - I think. Tomorrow's the big day. I have some family coming in, so waiting 'til then. Spent today installing stays, shrouds and spreaders (Only 3 trips to the marine hardware store today).




    Mast is in position, gin pole up and a 5-part block and tackle between top of gin pole and bowsprit.






    Fingers crossed. Hope tomorrow goes well.

    Travis.

  2. #107
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Hope you have a windless day for the mast raising. Going back to the beginning of this thread, I see that the boat came with the wooden sticks. Were they original? Rare to see wooden masts on a fiberglass boat.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  3. #108
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Have you tested that tackle with some pressure? Not for strength, but for twist. Long tackles like that like to twist round and round,binding up .
    If that happens, consider a single line to the windlass.
    bruce

  4. #109
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Very exciting! She's looking terrific! Hope it goes really well!!

    Rick

  5. #110
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    Default Re: Zuri

    SUCCESS.

    Big milestone day. With the help of some family and friends, had a great day. Masts went up without incident.

    Rich - yes, wood masts were original to the boat. These were refurbished by a previous owner. There are a few dutchmans and some scarfs evident but he did a pretty good job. This ketch model was made late 60s and early 70s. It's basically a wood boat with a fiberglass hull.

    Bruce - thanks for the heads up. I used braided nylon line for the tackle which didn't twist. The tackle handled beautifully. I could see that being a pretty significant issue with something like 3-strand though.

    Thanks Rick - it went very well, thankfully.






    The stays are fastened with turnbuckles but the shrouds just have temporary lashings.



    I converted her from interior chainplates to exterior. Also, added bulwarks so the chain plate height sits higher than original. The plan is, now that the rig is up, to semi tune the rig (it's pretty bad right now) then order new swageless fittings and install those at the right height to accommodate the turnbuckles.

    The masts are not aligned, nor are they straight up and down, but they are secure enough for today. Tomorrow I'll start tuning the rigging a bit to get the sticks roughly where they need to be so I can take some measurements and order fittings.

    All in all, I'm just happy that the sticks are up. It's been just over 5 years now on this project and this is a big one for me. I went out to eat tonight with family in celebration. Afterwards, I couldn't help myself but come back to the boat alone and just sit in the cockpit for a while, watching the sun go down and just daydreaming of sailing her.

    Travis.

  6. #111
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Congratulations! Fantastic and she looks ...... amazing!

    Rick

  7. #112
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Congratulations Travis!!
    Daydreaming is a must !!!
    Absolutely beautiful!

  8. #113
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Quote Originally Posted by Zuri View Post
    ...All in all, I'm just happy that the sticks are up. It's been just over 5 years now on this project and this is a big one for me. I went out to eat tonight with family in celebration. Afterwards, I couldn't help myself but come back to the boat alone and just sit in the cockpit for a while, watching the sun go down and just daydreaming of sailing her.

    Travis.
    I totally get that one! Been there... Congratulations, not only is it a big step, but a major psychological one.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  9. #114
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Now it really looks like a sailboat!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  10. #115
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Great job Travis - she looks terrific.
    PeterW

  11. #116
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Big Question:
    . but NOT about the boat . . .
    I can clearly & easily recognize a visionary work of art, based on a lovely hull and years of patient observation and varied experience, created by a patient master craftsperson as a labor of love. The rest is just interesting detail.
    . . .
    What about the dog ?
    Looks very much like our own, Mystery pup/ Rescue/ All Purpose/ 9yo_mellow-she/ 16lbs of Wild Haired Terrier/ Carin-ish . . . .
    Dog pic (link will not auto display?):: https://goo.gl/photos/CxQwqGnnxED5qrJJ8
    This is the first lesson ye should learn: There is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, it doesn't behoove any of us to speak evil of the rest of us.
    E. Cayce

  12. #117
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    Default Re: Zuri

    What a gorgeous thing she is! Congratulations.

  13. #118
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    Everett, WA, USA
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Thanks guys.

    George - The dog is mostly Cairn, some schnauzer too. A couple years after the divorce, I was living on a boat (not this one) and my daughter suggested I should get a dog. I said ok but he has to be funny looking and be able to go kayaking with me. She found him in an animal shelter and I agreed to take him in.

    I've had him about 5 years now. I picked him up about the same time as I picked up this sailboat. At first he wouldn't make eye contact - just would hide in the corner or under a chair. He looked a little like this boat when I saw him the first time - missing half his hair, undernourished, emaciated and outright dejected. I learned he spend a couple months in a California shelter where nobody would take him. Then he shipped up to Washington for another couple months in a different shelter before my daughter found him. They had to separate him from the others because he would just cower in a corner and was an easy target for the other dogs.

    It took a couple years for him to come out of his shell. Now he's pretty much transformed into a full blown terrier. Not sure what happened, but I'm certain he had a pretty traumatic early life. He's turned out to be great little happy buddy and goes with me pretty much everywhere. He loves the car (boat too). It's his sanctuary and he likes to spend a lot of time in it. Though he guards the car fearlessly and will discipline anyone (other than me) who gets near it when he's in it. Outside the car, he's friendly to others. He's clung on to me and wants to go wherever I go. And he pretty much does.

    Back to the boat.

    I got the rigging tuned a little better, enough to take measurements and order the hardware needed to complete the job. Fitting the booms for the first time too.








    Meanwhile, work continues on in preparation for fitting the diesel engine.




    Fuel tank support is all constructed, tabbed in, filleted and ready for paint. Bedlogs are pretty much done too - 3 layers of fiberglass. Just needs a final sanding then the engine compartment is ready for paint.



    Hope to paint the engine compartment this weekend.

    Travis.

  14. #119
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Congratulations, Travis. She looks great with the masts up. You've done wonders for the dog too.
    I'll be in your audience for the engine installation too.
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  15. #120
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Thanks Ian, I'm definitely in your audience on your Kotik build.

    Engine bay is now painted and ready for the diesel.



    Fuel tank support is tabbed in with fiberglass tape. There are 3 layers of fiberglass on the bed logs. 2 coats of paint.



    Fuel tank support is done. I also had to increase the prop shaft tube outside diameter from 1-3/4" to 2" to get the new stuffing box to fit. That's now complete too.



    Next up is the placement of the diesel on the bed logs. There's still quite a bit of work after that though. Exhaust system, control system, fuel system, instrument panel. I need to build a platform for the water muffler and battery box. That will keep me busy over the next few weeks.

    Travis.

  16. #121
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Love your work Travis .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  17. #122
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Thanks Peter.

    The plan is to use the mizzen as a crane for getting the new diesel engine into the boat. That requires securing the standing rigging which means going up the masts a few times.

    I've been up the mast now a couple times to secure the triatic stay. I have a commercial bosun chair but the problem is that the pick point is too high. With the carabiner, gri gri and tackle above I can't get as close as I want to the block, which is still a bit down from the top of the mast. It was a struggle to get that triatic turnbuckle in. I'd like to have a chair with a lower pick point.

    I spent an evening making a "better" bosun chair. That was a fail. I just couldn't get a lower pick point to work without a hard back. I have a climbing harness but I don't want to use it. There is quite a bit of work to do, suspended in a chair, in the future with varnish, adding sail tracks, wiring etc that I will be spending considerable time in it and climbing harness are not comfortable. OK for quick emergencies but not for spending half a day prepping and varnishing in the future.

    So the next experiment was to make a bosun chair with a hard back. I ended up cannibalizing a steel framed chair. That turned out great. Low pick point, comfortable and secure. I should have done that from the start.



    Work on the rigging continues. I've been waiting on parts and some have arrived.

    Other than the (2) main shrouds and the forestay, all of my standing rigging is 3/16. Running the numbers, the swageless fittings are about $60 each. I have (15) 3/16" cables and (3) 1/4" cables. That's (30) fittings for the 3/16" if I replace all of them and I plan on doing that. I can get (20) grade 316 stainless swage fittings for about $100 and a hydraulic tool to crimp the fittings for about $200. The hydraulic tool is a 16-ton press good for up to the 3/16" swage fittings. I couldn't find any, within reason, rated for anything larger. So - I'll use swageless fittings for the 1/4" cables and swaged fittings for the 3/16". I also picked up a 500 ft spool of 1x19 3/16" 316L stainless wire rope.

    Time for a mock-up and test.




    I made a short test piece with a couple swage fittings. I wanted to make sure the cable, fittings and hydraulic crimper work before using it on the boat.

    With the sample piece, I went over to the storage garage and lifted my old 650 lb diesel.



    No problem, but that's not much of a stress test. I then shackled the test piece to the frame of the lift, set the arm to it's maximum 2 ton capacity and cranked away on the pump. It's not very scientific but I'm pretty sure I got it up to it's 2 ton capacity, maybe more. I'm surprised something didn't break - that cable was really tight - sung like a piano wire when plucked. I ended up bending the shackle clevis pins but the cable and fittings held. With 2-tons or 4,000 lbs of force on the cable, that stresses the 3/16" diameter cable to about 145 ksi. I believe the breaking strength on this is not much more than that. That's good enough for me to demonstrate proof of concept and I'll never stress the cables anywhere near that.

    Still waiting on new turnbuckles and the swageless fittings. More to come.

    Thanks for watching.

    Travis.
    Last edited by Zuri; 07-20-2017 at 03:39 PM.

  18. #123
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Another milestone for me today.

    Placing the diesel in is one of those things I've been envisioning for a long time with all sorts of nightmare scenarios running through my head. After it's done though, it turned out pretty uneventful, and a relief.

    Over the last few days I replaced the temporary lashings with new end fittings and turnbuckles. The new bosun chair worked great. I can work the top of the mast easier now. I went up the mizzen and swapped the back block to a double block and installed a front block which will act as the main boom topping lift. Now I have (2) topping lifts and a halyard on the mizzen.

    The diesel is hoisted using the mizzen as a crane. I modified my gin pole to act as a temporary boom. I didn't want to use the mizzen boom, mainly because I didn't like the way it could pry on the gooseneck fitting under compression and I didn't want to risk damaging it. I experimented with a few different ways of rigging and came up with what you see below as the best option. I'm using my diesel tank as a mock-up to work out any glitches since it only weighs about 75 lbs.



    Time for placing the diesel into the boat.



    I used the dinghy trailer to transport the diesel over to the boat.



    With the help of a couple of friends (Thanks Aaron and Wynn) the diesel went up easily. Above, you can see the new prop shaft and cutlass bearing are installed. The stuffing box is also installed.



    Here, my sailing buddy Aaron is installing the feet. The motor is then lowered down into place through the removable sole.

    Engine is sitting on the bedlogs in it's approximate final position. We'll call that a success and another big milestone towards getting the boat in the water.



    Turns out I'm going to have to rework those bedlogs a little more. Width is fine, but I need to add some more height. The new diesel sits a little lower than the previous one, and I didn't realize it until looking at it in place. Still, I'm pretty happy with the progress. These things are always a couple steps forward and one back. There's still quite a bit of work to do before firing up the engine.

    Travis.

  19. #124
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Execellent

  20. #125
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Travis - you made that look quite easy. But then 'easy' comes from all the prior planning and prep.
    Well done!
    PeterW

  21. #126
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Yes, it's all very carefully thought out. That's a good stage reached.
    Ian

  22. #127
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Great! Love that shot of the motor from inside! A little sci-fi!

    Rick

  23. #128
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    Default Re: Zuri

    I like to to remove the stuffing box for alignment (just pull the hose forward) to be sure the shaft is in the center of the tube.
    Nice looking mill!

  24. #129
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Now that the Shellback is done, summer is about to turn so it's back to work on Zuri.

    We haven't had rain in quite a while so there is a pretty thick coating of dirt (and bird droppings) all over her.

    First thing is to move the diesel off the bedlogs so I can rework them. I made a temporary cradle that sits on the fuel tank platform and hoisted the diesel, using the mizzen mast as a crane, onto the cradle.



    I glued up the bedlog risers a while ago. Here they are being installed. This will get the engine to sit at the proper elevation. Sanded the paint off the mating surfaces and epoxied the risers in place.



    You can also see the temporary cradle, supporting the engine, sitting on the fuel tank platform.

    Travis.

  25. #130
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    Default Re: Zuri

    A little more progress.

    Bedlog risers took a few days. Sanding, filleting then fiberglassing - 3 layers. I could do all 3 layers in one day but only one side at a time. Crawling down in there to fiberglass, I had to perch my way on top of one while working on the other.




    After a couple days set up time, the engine goes back in for a rough alignment so I can mark the engine mount locations to drill out.

    It's nice to have the removable sole. While aligning, I couldn't imagine trying to do that crammed in this space under a fixed sole.



    I was mainly concerned with forward/aft position and lateral alignment. Vertical alignment can be further dialed in without affecting the position of the mounts so that wasn't as big of a concern here.

    Shaft spins easy, feeler gauge looks pretty good on the coupling for side to side. Lateral alignment looks pretty good.



    Slid the stuffing box forward to look at the reveal around the shaft tube. Looks pretty good. It could come up a bit. When I pull the engine for drilling the mounts I'll slide the shaft back and just let it rest in the cutlass bearing and see where she lies.

    For the fore/aft positioning, I need to be able to pull the prop on and off without removing the shaft and be able to fit a zinc between prop and cutlass bearing.



    Didn't take long to find the sweet spot. Prop slides on - no problem here.



    I have a couple inches for the zinc too.

    With the motor position established and roughly aligned, I marked the location of the mounts and will pull the motor out again.

    Travis.

  26. #131
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    Default Re: Zuri

    I'm impressed with the work you're doing--a FAR bigger project than I've ever tackled. Looking good!

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  27. #132
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Excellent planning and workmanship!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  28. #133
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Fine work, Travis. Great to meet you at Port Townsend!
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  29. #134
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    Default Re: Zuri

    High calibre pf work Travis.

  30. #135
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Thanks Tom and Rich.

    Ian - is was great to see you too at the WBF.

    Bruce - it was great meeting you too. Thanks for the tip about sliding the stuffing box forward and looking at the shaft. It's stuff like that that's pretty helpful.

    Pulled the motor (hopefully for the last time) and drilled the bolt holes. Done in a series of steps - punch, pilot then incremental stepping. I mark center lines before drilling to make sure the holes don't wander as they get larger, and to locate the straws later.



    The holes go all the way through the bedlogs. I've heard that lags can work loose, so if manageable, through bolts are preferable.



    Mixed up some thickened epoxy and stuffed a little up the bottom of the hole so it can hold a straw.



    The straws will act as pre-drilled pilot holes for the bolt installation. Holes here are over sized so that epoxy seals the wood around the bolt. I used this method for anchoring all the deck hardware and this technique has worked well for me. The straws allow me to dial in the location and make sure the pilot hole has protection all around. The tape surrounds the straw and keeps the top of the straw in position while the bottom plug cures. The epoxy plug only extends up about 1/2" or so from the bottom and will seal the hole for next days pour.

    The next day after the epoxy cures (holding the straw), I mix up epoxy thickened with colloidal silicate (West 404) and work it down the hole. It takes a while and helps to keep poking it with a wire to work out any air. The wood sucks the epoxy in too so it's best to not thicken the epoxy too much (ketchup consistency). After a few rounds and about 1/2 hr or so, the hole won't take up any more.



    I'll keep an eye on these until the epoxy kicks and make sure the straws stay in position (which they naturally want to do from yesterdays procedure).

    Travis.

  31. #136
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    Default Re: Zuri

    After a couple days, epoxy is hard enough to sand, holes drilled out, bolts test fit. Ready for paint.



    And a couple coats of paint.



    Engine permanently mounted.



    Prop shaft hooked up.



    With the engine now permanently installed, I can go on to fit the exhaust system. That's next on the agenda.

    Travis.

  32. #137
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Excellent! Well done! That's a very interesting technique with the straws.
    Ian

  33. #138
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    Default Re: Zuri

    ...................drooling over the motor here..................
    Last edited by 2dogsnight; 09-26-2017 at 08:44 PM.

  34. #139
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Nice work Travis. The engine looks nice and accessible all round.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  35. #140
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    Default Re: Zuri

    Thanks guys.

    Ya Greg, I couldn't imagine trying to align or service the engine on some boats I've seen. It also helps that the new motor is quite a bit more compact than the original Perkins 4-107. I wanted plenty of access and didn't want to disassemble my galley to service the diesel so the removable sole was a design feature early on. In fact, the sole was designed first to allow the fuel tank and diesel to drop in and the rest of the cockpit was designed around that.

    Cut the control arm opening today



    And fit the control arm



    From above, crawling down into the lazarette:



    I'm starting to work on the exhaust layout.



    I bolted on the high-rise exhaust elbow. You see it above the prop shaft coupling. That needs to feed into the water muffler which will go about here. I need to build a platform for the muffler. It means the exhaust hose will have a couple elbows in it.

    A schematic of the exhaust system looks like this:



    There's a loop above the muffler then it feeds down to the exhaust outlet towards the back there:



    I think I'll mock it up with some 2-inch pvc pipe, fittings and some duct tape to see what I need and to position the muffler platform. I think I want the loop sitting between the control arm and the other gusset plate which holds the manual bilge pump.

    Travis.

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