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Thread: Improved visibility in the shop?

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Padanaram, MA USA
    Posts
    9,196

    Default Re: Improved visibility in the shop?

    I figured that all manufacturers state their numbers in the most favorable way possible and hoped that they'd distort to a similar degree.
    In the end, as the door comprises less than 5% of the shop's total envelope, I stopped fussing over it.

  2. #37

    Default Re: Improved visibility in the shop?

    Alex - This is GREAT information! I suppose it would have been available in some lighting textbook somewhere, but your description has made it incredibly accessible! Thanks so much for taking the time to write it all down. I've printed it out and pinned it to the wall in my shop for use when I begin replacing the old 4' flourescents.
    One question: What's your opinion of ~5000 kelvin vs say ~4100 kelvin?
    Regards,
    -Paul

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    945

    Default Re: Improved visibility in the shop?

    Quote Originally Posted by PaulGrun View Post
    Alex - This is GREAT information! I suppose it would have been available in some lighting textbook somewhere, but your description has made it incredibly accessible! Thanks so much for taking the time to write it all down. I've printed it out and pinned it to the wall in my shop for use when I begin replacing the old 4' flourescents.
    One question: What's your opinion of ~5000 kelvin vs say ~4100 kelvin?
    Regards,
    -Paul
    Paul, Apologies for the late reply. I've been travelling where the net connections were spotty and have just returned. Glad to have been of help.

    As for a lamp with colour temperature of 5000 K vs 4100, I personally find the 5000 K way too cool, which feels to me to be harsh. I even find the 4100 K lamps a little harsh. I prefer 3500 K lamps if I can get them. 3000 K on the other hand feels a little muddy to me.

    But, to a large degree it's a personal thing. Some people swear by the higher colour temperatures. Go to your local big box store and have a browse through their lighting display. Usually they will have some of each of the various temperatures.
    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    945

    Default Re: Improved visibility in the shop?

    Further to the discussion about colour temperature of light sources, have a look at the following image. It's a picture of the light from one of those solar tube skylights, side by side with what looks to be a regular incandescent lamp light fixture, taken at my local rec centre today. Solar tube on the right, incandescent lamp on the left. Now my iPhone doesn't have the colour range of my eye, so the daylight looks white-blue in this picture. In reality the sunlight was bluer than it appears in this image. This is daylight at about 15:30 on the day of summer solstice, at about 47 degrees latitude. It's probably well above 5000 K colour temperature. By contrast look how yellow the incandescent looks. Colour temperature about 2700 K. Both would have, by definition, a CRI (colour rendering index) of 100.

    Neither is right or wrong, it's just what you prefer.

    My personal preference is for somewhere in between.

    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

  5. #40

    Default Re: Improved visibility in the shop?

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    Further to the discussion about colour temperature of light sources, have a look at the following image. It's a picture of the light from one of those solar tube skylights, side by side with what looks to be a regular incandescent lamp light fixture, taken at my local rec centre today. Solar tube on the right, incandescent lamp on the left. Now my iPhone doesn't have the colour range of my eye, so the daylight looks white-blue in this picture. In reality the sunlight was bluer than it appears in this image. This is daylight at about 15:30 on the day of summer solstice, at about 47 degrees latitude. It's probably well above 5000 K colour temperature. By contrast look how yellow the incandescent looks. Colour temperature about 2700 K. Both would have, by definition, a CRI (colour rendering index) of 100.

    Neither is right or wrong, it's just what you prefer.

    My personal preference is for somewhere in between.

    That is a very interesting picture! I've been shifting lighs in my house to LEDs, and have more or less settled on 3500K (from memory. I'm too lazy to walk upstairs and look at the box I've saved to remind me). I'm thinking of going a bit bluer for the shop and garage...maybe 4000K - 4500K. A bit harsh, but also easier to see details (especially for old farts like me). Thanks again for your insights. Very helpful.

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