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Thread: Southern Cross

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    The devil is in the detail......and looking at Southern Cross shows the details have been well and truly thought of..... "dry floor concept"...say no more ( didnt see any shag-pile carpet though).

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    I've been reading Sir Francis Chichesters autobiography. Doing hard stuff alone, just because. I can't say I understand it, but I think I have a sort of grudging admiration. Which I guess means I think you are slightly crazy but would not for a moment discourage you, and certainly wish you the very best.

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    I've been reading Sir Francis Chichesters autobiography. Doing hard stuff alone, just because. I can't say I understand it, but I think I have a sort of grudging admiration. Which I guess means I think you are slightly crazy but would not for a moment discourage you, and certainly wish you the very best.
    I think even the "slightly crazy" wouldnt have the focus for the tiny details. I see a well executed mission being planned by a man who will do what he feels best when he feels like it, and not dictated to by any outside pressure.....usually makes for "boring" adventure. Not to say the majority would not agree with your words though if given the facts of Patagonia and a boat under 12ft!

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Hey Rob
    Slocums book is excellent. Embarrassed to say I have just read it for the first time as part of my research for the voyage. I am going for a number of reasons paramount of which is to dig deeper into the lives and history of the Yaghan people. Sadly they are gone now but the remnants of where they lived for thousands of years (village and camp sites, etc) are scattered throughout the region and many of these have not been seen by modern man (those in the SW islands) and I hope to stay in these places and document them. Slocum got into serious trouble headed into the "Milky Way" (the SW islands), this is where I want to sail and explore. The voyage may not have much cache to some but to me it may be the most dangerous place to sail any where. The route I am going to take is fraught with challenges and dangers and the first 1/4 of the voyage is by far the most difficult second only to the Wollastons and Cape Horn but it is a neck and neck second.

    In PT last month a nice sailing couple (circumnavigators) came to see my boat as I derived after sailing and they told me of a recent mishap in the SW islands, they were not sure but said a very famous sailor was just lost there...............he was in a big boat the antithesis of my strategy.

    I have always had a tough time sleeping in hammocks but a great idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Oh, that was always one of my favorite parts about Slocum's book, the carpet tacks on the deck at night. Same neck of the woods, and all.

    That dry floor deal is slick. When I sleep under a tent in an open boat, I always use a simple soft hammock stored in a,dry bag and slung between two hard points, so I always have a dryinsh place to sleep, that's at least out of the bilge with all the foot water, apple cores, and rain or spray.

    I really enjoy all the pictures. Please post more, if you can during trials and before launch.

    Peace,
    Robert

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Re: The shag carpet. I would have gone shag but couldn't find that lovely mid 1960's pea green color. Dang.
    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    The devil is in the detail......and looking at Southern Cross shows the details have been well and truly thought of..... "dry floor concept"...say no more ( didnt see any shag-pile carpet though).

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    300 mile jaunt, very cool. I would love to do that particular Vancouver trip.
    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    Looking really good Howard!

    I am half in awe, half in envy of your trip. Makes our 300 mile jaunt up the coast of Vancouver Island this summer look like a day outing.

    All the best.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    Re: The shag carpet. I would have gone shag but couldn't find that lovely mid 1960's pea green color. Dang.
    I was thinking more like 70's burnt-terracotta-orange....something warm looking might be a bit more pshychologically (sp) important down those cold parts.....would blend with your colour scheme....

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    I'm following along, too, from the coast of Maine. How did I miss the info on your woodstove? Which stove is it and what are you using for fuel?


    Steven

  9. #44

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Good Luck Howard - though, no, as you indicate best not to have to rely on (dumb) luck - but make your own - which I see you doing in spades!
    I hope somebody gets some good shots as you put Southern Cross to the test in expedition trim. I imagine a swamped boat battling the sorts of seas you mention in your first adventure all those years ago .....
    Hey! I am not wishing that upon you - I too would hope you have a safe and idyllic trip (and bring to the wider world some insight into the Yaghan people who perhaps have received unfair treatment at the hands of history)- and that good management and good judgement stand you in good stead in all your endeavours.
    Buon viaggio then,
    from frank

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by StevenBauer View Post
    I'm following along, too, from the coast of Maine. How did I miss the info on your woodstove? Which stove is it and what are you using for fuel?


    Steven
    it's a very cool... or maybe hot , Stainless steel? advertised as a "back packing stove", designed to burn wood... there's lots of info in a thread some where here...

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    Hey Rob
    Slocums book is excellent. Embarrassed to say I have just read it for the first time as part of my research for the voyage. I am going for a number of reasons paramount of which is to dig deeper into the lives and history of the Yaghan people. Sadly they are gone now but the remnants of where they lived for thousands of years (village and camp sites, etc) are scattered throughout the region and many of these have not been seen by modern man (those in the SW islands) and I hope to stay in these places and document them. Slocum got into serious trouble headed into the "Milky Way" (the SW islands), this is where I want to sail and explore. The voyage may not have much cache to some but to me it may be the most dangerous place to sail any where. The route I am going to take is fraught with challenges and dangers and the first 1/4 of the voyage is by far the most difficult second only to the Wollastons and Cape Horn but it is a neck and neck second.

    In PT last month a nice sailing couple (circumnavigators) came to see my boat as I derived after sailing and they told me of a recent mishap in the SW islands, they were not sure but said a very famous sailor was just lost there...............he was in a big boat the antithesis of my strategy.

    I have always had a tough time sleeping in hammocks but a great idea.
    Howard,
    I'm even more excited for you now. I have always been fascinated by all the Americans, but the Yaghans are one of the most unique.
    Just imagine being down there and seeing some half naked cats in canoes... Or being in such a "deserted" place, and finding yourself surrounded by fires...

    I will certainly not argue that you are sailing into one of, if not THE gnarliest place on earth. However, I know you are an adventurer, a modern day explorer type, and not a stunt man.

    I hope you have a fantastic summer.

    Peace,
    Robert

  12. #47
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    Thumbs up Re: Southern Cross

    Hi Howard, sounds that the narrative point of view will change from the first-person to the third-person soon. All the best for your voyage! I hope Southern Cross takes good care of you and brings you back safely.

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    I think John Welsford and another person may be keeping folks up to date with photo and report posts from Chile before I set sail.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Thanks Ian
    I chose small because I can man handle her onto land (with some work) and I can work hard to sail her flat with my weight as moveable ballast. Southern across also draws inches (board up) and will go to weather quite nicely on her skegs. Good for poking the shallows when seeing protection, beaching, etc

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Thumps up Howard! Southern Cross looks awesome man!
    I hope all the gods will keep an eye on you and send you manageable weather and helping currents.
    Good luck on you.
    Best wishes and save travels
    Max

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Hi Max.
    Thank you. I plan to be as careful and conservative as I can be. If I am able I am going to have the chance to explore one of those last untrodden places on the planet, much of which has likely never seen the foot of man. We'll see!
    Thanks again.
    Quote Originally Posted by Max F View Post
    Thumps up Howard! Southern Cross looks awesome man!
    I hope all the gods will keep an eye on you and send you manageable weather and helping currents.
    Good luck on you.
    Best wishes and save travels
    Max

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    A quick note from the Strait of Magellan
    I am here and awaiting my boat, which was due in yesterday but has been delayed in shipping. Today I should hear from the shipping agent as to exactly when it will arrive.

    Plenty to do though, seeking provisions, meeting with the Armada, customs, purchased charts and am about to waterproof them, a long list of "to do's" done. I arrived in Chile on Dec 3rd and was shortly joined by John Welsford and his wife Denny, Phil McGowin and Dave Nichols. This is the film crew documenting my voyage. It has been consistently very windy here and brisk, southern spring time is in the air.

    I will keep updating here as I have time. Lots of logistical challenges once the boat arrives, glad my pal John is on board to help out.

  17. #52
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Thanks for the update. No need to tell you how important those small details can be, so good you have time to sort them.

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    The devil is in the details for sure. My little back burner project (a voyage in a small boat) has been running smoothly albeit slowly given my life, wife, cutting the lawn, work, etc etc all has had to take priority. Well I say smoothly until the day before I had to have the crated boat meet the shipment truck. I thought I had done a pretty good job with 12 hours to go before the truck hook up the wheels fell off!

    I ran into a major heart breaking snag of my doing and had to instantly get over it and get on with it, a great warm up for all the ad lib work that will come my way. The issue had serious knock on impacts and I am experiencing them now that I am here in Chile. This is the nature of voyaging, things happen, suck it up and move on instantly. Nothing insurmountable but close.

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    A quick note from the Strait of Magellan
    I am here and awaiting my boat, which was due in yesterday but has been delayed in shipping. Today I should hear from the shipping agent as to exactly when it will arrive.

    Plenty to do though, seeking provisions, meeting with the Armada, customs, purchased charts and am about to waterproof them, a long list of "to do's" done. I arrived in Chile on Dec 3rd and was shortly joined by John Welsford and his wife Denny, Phil McGowin and Dave Nichols. This is the film crew documenting my voyage. It has been consistently very windy here and brisk, southern spring time is in the air.

    I will keep updating here as I have time. Lots of logistical challenges once the boat arrives, glad my pal John is on board to help out.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Hang in there, Howard. Stay flexible and don't lose your sense of humor. That's what gets me through the rough times. If it was easy, everybody would be doing it. We're pulling for ya!

  20. #55
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Hi Howard

    Thank you for sharing info on your trip and the boat. Do you have any photos of how the rudder is rigged to extend and retract? We are working a similar setup on our Penobscot 14.

    Have a great trip!

    Kent

  21. #56
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Hi Howard,
    go with care. Wish I could be there to.
    John

  22. #57
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    The devil is in the details for sure. My little back burner project (a voyage in a small boat) has been running smoothly albeit slowly given my life, wife, cutting the lawn, work, etc etc all has had to take priority. Well I say smoothly until the day before I had to have the crated boat meet the shipment truck. I thought I had done a pretty good job with 12 hours to go before the truck hook up the wheels fell off!

    I ran into a major heart breaking snag of my doing and had to instantly get over it and get on with it, a great warm up for all the ad lib work that will come my way. The issue had serious knock on impacts and I am experiencing them now that I am here in Chile. This is the nature of voyaging, things happen, suck it up and move on instantly. Nothing insurmountable but close.
    a major heart breaking snag ?


    hope things work out for you guys, hope you can have fun and enjoy the ride even if there's a few bumps along the way.

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    When small boat voyaging bumps along the way = to be expected.

    Some bumps are easy in that they happen as isolated incidents, others have knock on impacts. The day before my link up with the first delivery truck (Michigan to Miami) I hit a snag and as a result I had to mad scramble to get the boat loaded meaning other things in the programmed run up to arrival here on the Strait of Magellan couldn't happen. My fault, classic pilot error, so it goes.

    I have spent days here solving the "knock ons" with moderate success meaning I will sail with some trouble. However a new twist (to be expected) has occurred, my boat is late now going on a week and I can't get to solving the Michigan mishap until it does. Makes me nervous given where I am about to sail.

    The boat was due in on the 15th and now I am not sure when it will arrive. If it had come in on schedule I could have gotten after a replacement mizzen mast build with the materials I sourced and tossed in the crate before screwing it shut in Michigan. Yet here I sit waiting, today a day off as I have done what I can as far as provisioning, etc.

    The day before she shipped I was in full load mode, a squall came up blowing piles of fall leaves and some of my gear around the shop yard. I moved my truck to get a dry bag that had blown under it and drove over my mizzen mast which had been covered by leaves in the blow. What a stun moment! This caused me to stop and source sitka and more epoxy (6 hours gone in a day that was running so smoothly). The knock on is this, I could not go to pick up the unbuilt utility trailer going in the crate for easy land transport here nor 40 or so percent of my dry food (grains already purchased) and a dry bag of essential gear. No time.

    I managed to find the one sitka board within a 200 mile radius of my location and additional epoxy so I would not have to use my on board repair stock. I made the truck the next day with 30 minutes to spare knowing they would leave if I was delayed, or so I was told. In the end my all nighter wasn't that critical because the trucker and his wife were the nicest folks and said they would have waited as they were excited to meet me and my little "on a shoestring budget" dream.
    Oh well, I'm still a happy guy having accomplished this much.

    There is little room for error down here as it is plain ice cold and windy as can be every day just like I remembered from my last voyage south of the Beagle Channel. Don't like the weather, no worries it will change in minutes and does.

    The last photo is of my sailing canoe Sylph being packaged for shipment to Micronesia...................I long for even smaller and simpler!


    Below is a photo of the boat in the crate. Fractured mizzen mast is in the crate, lower left corner of photo. If it had to be a broken spar the mizzen was the one, simple to build..............so I am building a birds mouth spar in Patagonia, another new and exciting experience all part of the big picture.
    [IMG][
    [IMG][/IMG]


    [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]
    I'll miss that mizzen mast, I built a beauty, strong and light. Now I'll build another.
    [IMG][/IMG]

  24. #59
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Bummer! We've all done things like that! But not what you're about to do .... A minor hiccup - go well!

    Rick

  25. #60
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    We hope it's just a hiccup and the knock ons can be solved . Good Luck!
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  26. #61
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    The Voyage of Southern Cross blog has been updated.
    http://thepocketyacht.blogspot.cl
    [IMG][/IMG]

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Howard,
    Best wishes. I wish for peace and calm for your would and mind. Remember that stress is very destructive, and you will be under enough without imposing any yourself.

    Enjoy this adventure. It sounds to be starting of exactly as adventures should!

    Peace, Love, and Luck
    Robert

  28. #63
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    In your phot of your "STACK O" STUFF " you are bringing,I didn't see a set of golf clubs !! otherwise , i wish you well and i hope you [ or someone ] will keep us updated
    When they really ARE out to get you, Paranoia is simply Smart Thinking !

  29. #64
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    curious about the "running shrouds", and associated gear, how do they work? like running back stays? I am considering running backs for my Centennial build, Johnson did not have them, he just had a single set of shrouds... but the running backs would just be a double purchase to a cleat.

  30. #65
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Thanks. I also believe in peace of mind. I am practicing patience in all I do during the coming months. To not do so would invite trouble.
    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Howard,
    Best wishes. I wish for peace and calm for your would and mind. Remember that stress is very destructive, and you will be under enough without imposing any yourself.

    Enjoy this adventure. It sounds to be starting of exactly as adventures should!

    Peace, Love, and Luck
    Robert

  31. #66
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Thanks
    Looks like the web site Below40south.com is going to post occasional updates. John Welsford will be penning them.
    Quote Originally Posted by watson1990 View Post
    In your phot of your "STACK O" STUFF " you are bringing,I didn't see a set of golf clubs !! otherwise , i wish you well and i hope you [ or someone ] will keep us updated

  32. #67
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    curious about the "running shrouds", and associated gear, how do they work? like running back stays? I am considering running backs for my Centennial build, Johnson did not have them, he just had a single set of shrouds... but the running backs would just be a double purchase to a cleat.
    Hi Daniel

    In the photo below you can see the running shrouds in use. If you look at the head sail luff tension you can see it is tight. The "running shrouds" (I call them that for lack of a better term, not true running back stays I figure due their location) sole purpose is to offer head stay tension. Each operates off of a small winch with integrated handle and a cam cleat for instant release. Running backstays would have been an issue to set up after each tacking maneuver and they would have been to far aft causing potential issues. So I have the running shrouds rigged through bronze turning blocks leading to the winches. Should I crack off down wind and the boom become pinned against a shroud I can quickly blow the shroud. As you can imagine in heavy air a boom forced against a fixed shroud could cause a capsize.

    I have also added a few photos from here in Punta Arenas and a shot of the film poster. John Welsford and David Nichols have partnered up and are producing a documentary about my voyage. They have set my boat up with gopro cameras and I have agreed to shot film as best I can for delivery to them after the trip. Good on these guys for teaming up to make a small boat film and particularly one about a wooden boat.
    There will be updates available for anyone interested on the Below 40 South web site- Below40south.com
    Hope this helps.

    Note:
    I am now on the Strait of Magellan and yesterday purchased fresh food and loaded it aboard. This means I am hours away from setting sail. It has been a long development process.

    Have a vision, decide on a boat design, build it, equip it, test it, ship it to one of the most remote places on the planet and then go for a sail. I did this all out of pocket and of course with so many friends pitching in to lend a hand. I am not the film, meaning I have no ability to gain anything from it. I just figured why not help John and Dave with the making of a film for wooden boat folks and for anyone else who might benefit by my experience.

    I have been using the voyage to engage with three elementary schools over the past year and have done a number of live stream classroom lessons, I have one at 3pm today. I will be staying in touch with the three school groups via sat phone while I sail. Seems hundreds of 4th and 5th grade students are inspired and the teachers find the voyage to be a great teaching tool as the experiences of the small boat sailor touch on math, geography, science, culture, etc.

    Glad to be a part of inspiring young minds. I had a teacher (5th grade) who changed the course of my life through inspiration to get out and live life as an adventure. Reckon if I am not giving then I am taking so I try to do a small part.

    This will be my last post here for in a matter of hours I set sail south.

    Thanks to all who have endured my posts here.


    [IMG]
    Photo-Deb Colvin
    [IMG]
    Punta Arenas Chile- Strait of magellan in the back ground.
    [IMG]
    In she goes.


    My current home
    [IMG]
    The film poster- Produced by David Nichols and John Welsford

  33. #68
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    To friends here and those whom I have not yet met.

    Tomorrow in the early dawn I will set out on the high tide.

    My time here is short and so I am taking this moment to say Thanks to all who have shared in my vision of sailing a small wooden boat south on the Strait of Magellan.

    For the Woodenboat public record:
    I am not voyaging in an under 12 foot wooden boat to prove a point or discover anything other than in myself. I am simply curious about the region and my insignificant place in it. If there is an underlying mission then it is to communicate with kids via tracking and sat phone with updates as I voyage. For the past year I have been communicating with school kids and have found meaning in doing so. They are excited and each group now has a chart of the region and will be following my progress. Both John Welsford and I have been conducting live stream classroom sessions while he was here in Chile, which I will follow up with sat phone calls as I can.

    I am quite intrigued by the challenge of managing a small boat here as I believe small does not necessarily equate with unfit or unsafe. A sound small boat in conservative hands can do some amazing things, it's all about patience. I am employing a specific voyaging strategy based on a previous small boat experience I had south of here that worked very nicely. I have built my small wooden boat for this endeavor because I believe it's smart. I can also field repair a wooden boat far more easily than one of other materials.

    I do find it unfortunate that some label me an idiot, fool, self serving, a publicity hound or that they simply don't support me or what I am doing. I believe its the boat size that trips them up. Well I haven't asked for support and I happen to believe in small boats as mentioned. Naysayers will be naysayers, every initiative taken on in life has them. Dissenting opinion is important and if seen in a positive light can actually help make what we do stronger.

    I have only been public about my plans to help the Dave Nichols/John Welsford film initiative. I am also shooting film and turning it over to them on my return, simple as that. I suppose going public means one must be ready for what comes with the territory of public scrutiny.

    I have not asked for sponsorship yet at the same time I recognize how great it is that so much has been offered to me by those friends who perhaps see a grain of value in what I am doing or hope to make my voyage a little safer. I hope their lives are an iota richer because of this and I am thankful for each and every one of them.

    Perhaps there is something of value in trying and even failing. I figure many folks just don't try. I may not get further than a mile out of Punta Arenas, who knows. The joy for me is in the doing and not the end result.

    Big boat sailors voyaging in the remotest places on the planet are rarely labeled as stunt hounds. I just happen to believe that for this part of the world a small boat makes good sense. I may lack some creature comforts afforded by larger boats but I can also sleep well at night knowing I am tucked tight in a small cove or up on land somewhere and not hanging on hope at anchor as williwaws roar down out of the mountains.

    There are many paths up the mountain of wisdom and freedom of expression. I respect them all as long as they are pure of heart and do not harm others. To each his own. I thank everyone here who has shown interest and perhaps gleaned even an ounce of inspiration from my little project.

    Life is full of dangerous moments and risk. I believe the biggest risk of all is avoiding change and challenge. Frozen by fear many of us are not living out our dreams deferring them to someday. This is life and not a rehearsal, I figure it's best to get on with it, whatever our particular it is.

    With respect to all from the SV Southern Cross.
    [IMG][/IMG]
    Last edited by Howard Rice; 01-18-2017 at 03:04 PM.

  34. #69
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    looking good, Bon' Voyage!

    just noticing in this last shot... (at her garboards) Scamp has a Clipper Bow

  35. #70
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    I'll say it again Howard: Vaya con Dios!
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

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