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Thread: Southern Cross

  1. #51
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    A quick note from the Strait of Magellan
    I am here and awaiting my boat, which was due in yesterday but has been delayed in shipping. Today I should hear from the shipping agent as to exactly when it will arrive.

    Plenty to do though, seeking provisions, meeting with the Armada, customs, purchased charts and am about to waterproof them, a long list of "to do's" done. I arrived in Chile on Dec 3rd and was shortly joined by John Welsford and his wife Denny, Phil McGowin and Dave Nichols. This is the film crew documenting my voyage. It has been consistently very windy here and brisk, southern spring time is in the air.

    I will keep updating here as I have time. Lots of logistical challenges once the boat arrives, glad my pal John is on board to help out.

  2. #52
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Thanks for the update. No need to tell you how important those small details can be, so good you have time to sort them.

  3. #53
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    The devil is in the details for sure. My little back burner project (a voyage in a small boat) has been running smoothly albeit slowly given my life, wife, cutting the lawn, work, etc etc all has had to take priority. Well I say smoothly until the day before I had to have the crated boat meet the shipment truck. I thought I had done a pretty good job with 12 hours to go before the truck hook up the wheels fell off!

    I ran into a major heart breaking snag of my doing and had to instantly get over it and get on with it, a great warm up for all the ad lib work that will come my way. The issue had serious knock on impacts and I am experiencing them now that I am here in Chile. This is the nature of voyaging, things happen, suck it up and move on instantly. Nothing insurmountable but close.

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    A quick note from the Strait of Magellan
    I am here and awaiting my boat, which was due in yesterday but has been delayed in shipping. Today I should hear from the shipping agent as to exactly when it will arrive.

    Plenty to do though, seeking provisions, meeting with the Armada, customs, purchased charts and am about to waterproof them, a long list of "to do's" done. I arrived in Chile on Dec 3rd and was shortly joined by John Welsford and his wife Denny, Phil McGowin and Dave Nichols. This is the film crew documenting my voyage. It has been consistently very windy here and brisk, southern spring time is in the air.

    I will keep updating here as I have time. Lots of logistical challenges once the boat arrives, glad my pal John is on board to help out.

  4. #54
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Hang in there, Howard. Stay flexible and don't lose your sense of humor. That's what gets me through the rough times. If it was easy, everybody would be doing it. We're pulling for ya!

  5. #55
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Hi Howard

    Thank you for sharing info on your trip and the boat. Do you have any photos of how the rudder is rigged to extend and retract? We are working a similar setup on our Penobscot 14.

    Have a great trip!

    Kent

  6. #56
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Hi Howard,
    go with care. Wish I could be there to.
    John

  7. #57
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    The devil is in the details for sure. My little back burner project (a voyage in a small boat) has been running smoothly albeit slowly given my life, wife, cutting the lawn, work, etc etc all has had to take priority. Well I say smoothly until the day before I had to have the crated boat meet the shipment truck. I thought I had done a pretty good job with 12 hours to go before the truck hook up the wheels fell off!

    I ran into a major heart breaking snag of my doing and had to instantly get over it and get on with it, a great warm up for all the ad lib work that will come my way. The issue had serious knock on impacts and I am experiencing them now that I am here in Chile. This is the nature of voyaging, things happen, suck it up and move on instantly. Nothing insurmountable but close.
    a major heart breaking snag ?


    hope things work out for you guys, hope you can have fun and enjoy the ride even if there's a few bumps along the way.

  8. #58
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    When small boat voyaging bumps along the way = to be expected.

    Some bumps are easy in that they happen as isolated incidents, others have knock on impacts. The day before my link up with the first delivery truck (Michigan to Miami) I hit a snag and as a result I had to mad scramble to get the boat loaded meaning other things in the programmed run up to arrival here on the Strait of Magellan couldn't happen. My fault, classic pilot error, so it goes.

    I have spent days here solving the "knock ons" with moderate success meaning I will sail with some trouble. However a new twist (to be expected) has occurred, my boat is late now going on a week and I can't get to solving the Michigan mishap until it does. Makes me nervous given where I am about to sail.

    The boat was due in on the 15th and now I am not sure when it will arrive. If it had come in on schedule I could have gotten after a replacement mizzen mast build with the materials I sourced and tossed in the crate before screwing it shut in Michigan. Yet here I sit waiting, today a day off as I have done what I can as far as provisioning, etc.

    The day before she shipped I was in full load mode, a squall came up blowing piles of fall leaves and some of my gear around the shop yard. I moved my truck to get a dry bag that had blown under it and drove over my mizzen mast which had been covered by leaves in the blow. What a stun moment! This caused me to stop and source sitka and more epoxy (6 hours gone in a day that was running so smoothly). The knock on is this, I could not go to pick up the unbuilt utility trailer going in the crate for easy land transport here nor 40 or so percent of my dry food (grains already purchased) and a dry bag of essential gear. No time.

    I managed to find the one sitka board within a 200 mile radius of my location and additional epoxy so I would not have to use my on board repair stock. I made the truck the next day with 30 minutes to spare knowing they would leave if I was delayed, or so I was told. In the end my all nighter wasn't that critical because the trucker and his wife were the nicest folks and said they would have waited as they were excited to meet me and my little "on a shoestring budget" dream.
    Oh well, I'm still a happy guy having accomplished this much.

    There is little room for error down here as it is plain ice cold and windy as can be every day just like I remembered from my last voyage south of the Beagle Channel. Don't like the weather, no worries it will change in minutes and does.

    The last photo is of my sailing canoe Sylph being packaged for shipment to Micronesia...................I long for even smaller and simpler!


    Below is a photo of the boat in the crate. Fractured mizzen mast is in the crate, lower left corner of photo. If it had to be a broken spar the mizzen was the one, simple to build..............so I am building a birds mouth spar in Patagonia, another new and exciting experience all part of the big picture.
    [IMG][
    [IMG][/IMG]


    [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]
    [IMG][/IMG]
    I'll miss that mizzen mast, I built a beauty, strong and light. Now I'll build another.
    [IMG][/IMG]

  9. #59
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Bummer! We've all done things like that! But not what you're about to do .... A minor hiccup - go well!

    Rick

  10. #60
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    We hope it's just a hiccup and the knock ons can be solved . Good Luck!
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  11. #61
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    The Voyage of Southern Cross blog has been updated.
    http://thepocketyacht.blogspot.cl
    [IMG][/IMG]

  12. #62
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Howard,
    Best wishes. I wish for peace and calm for your would and mind. Remember that stress is very destructive, and you will be under enough without imposing any yourself.

    Enjoy this adventure. It sounds to be starting of exactly as adventures should!

    Peace, Love, and Luck
    Robert

  13. #63
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    In your phot of your "STACK O" STUFF " you are bringing,I didn't see a set of golf clubs !! otherwise , i wish you well and i hope you [ or someone ] will keep us updated
    When they really ARE out to get you, Paranoia is simply Smart Thinking !

  14. #64
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    curious about the "running shrouds", and associated gear, how do they work? like running back stays? I am considering running backs for my Centennial build, Johnson did not have them, he just had a single set of shrouds... but the running backs would just be a double purchase to a cleat.

  15. #65
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Thanks. I also believe in peace of mind. I am practicing patience in all I do during the coming months. To not do so would invite trouble.
    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Howard,
    Best wishes. I wish for peace and calm for your would and mind. Remember that stress is very destructive, and you will be under enough without imposing any yourself.

    Enjoy this adventure. It sounds to be starting of exactly as adventures should!

    Peace, Love, and Luck
    Robert

  16. #66
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Thanks
    Looks like the web site Below40south.com is going to post occasional updates. John Welsford will be penning them.
    Quote Originally Posted by watson1990 View Post
    In your phot of your "STACK O" STUFF " you are bringing,I didn't see a set of golf clubs !! otherwise , i wish you well and i hope you [ or someone ] will keep us updated

  17. #67
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    curious about the "running shrouds", and associated gear, how do they work? like running back stays? I am considering running backs for my Centennial build, Johnson did not have them, he just had a single set of shrouds... but the running backs would just be a double purchase to a cleat.
    Hi Daniel

    In the photo below you can see the running shrouds in use. If you look at the head sail luff tension you can see it is tight. The "running shrouds" (I call them that for lack of a better term, not true running back stays I figure due their location) sole purpose is to offer head stay tension. Each operates off of a small winch with integrated handle and a cam cleat for instant release. Running backstays would have been an issue to set up after each tacking maneuver and they would have been to far aft causing potential issues. So I have the running shrouds rigged through bronze turning blocks leading to the winches. Should I crack off down wind and the boom become pinned against a shroud I can quickly blow the shroud. As you can imagine in heavy air a boom forced against a fixed shroud could cause a capsize.

    I have also added a few photos from here in Punta Arenas and a shot of the film poster. John Welsford and David Nichols have partnered up and are producing a documentary about my voyage. They have set my boat up with gopro cameras and I have agreed to shot film as best I can for delivery to them after the trip. Good on these guys for teaming up to make a small boat film and particularly one about a wooden boat.
    There will be updates available for anyone interested on the Below 40 South web site- Below40south.com
    Hope this helps.

    Note:
    I am now on the Strait of Magellan and yesterday purchased fresh food and loaded it aboard. This means I am hours away from setting sail. It has been a long development process.

    Have a vision, decide on a boat design, build it, equip it, test it, ship it to one of the most remote places on the planet and then go for a sail. I did this all out of pocket and of course with so many friends pitching in to lend a hand. I am not the film, meaning I have no ability to gain anything from it. I just figured why not help John and Dave with the making of a film for wooden boat folks and for anyone else who might benefit by my experience.

    I have been using the voyage to engage with three elementary schools over the past year and have done a number of live stream classroom lessons, I have one at 3pm today. I will be staying in touch with the three school groups via sat phone while I sail. Seems hundreds of 4th and 5th grade students are inspired and the teachers find the voyage to be a great teaching tool as the experiences of the small boat sailor touch on math, geography, science, culture, etc.

    Glad to be a part of inspiring young minds. I had a teacher (5th grade) who changed the course of my life through inspiration to get out and live life as an adventure. Reckon if I am not giving then I am taking so I try to do a small part.

    This will be my last post here for in a matter of hours I set sail south.

    Thanks to all who have endured my posts here.


    [IMG]
    Photo-Deb Colvin
    [IMG]
    Punta Arenas Chile- Strait of magellan in the back ground.
    [IMG]
    In she goes.


    My current home
    [IMG]
    The film poster- Produced by David Nichols and John Welsford

  18. #68
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    To friends here and those whom I have not yet met.

    Tomorrow in the early dawn I will set out on the high tide.

    My time here is short and so I am taking this moment to say Thanks to all who have shared in my vision of sailing a small wooden boat south on the Strait of Magellan.

    For the Woodenboat public record:
    I am not voyaging in an under 12 foot wooden boat to prove a point or discover anything other than in myself. I am simply curious about the region and my insignificant place in it. If there is an underlying mission then it is to communicate with kids via tracking and sat phone with updates as I voyage. For the past year I have been communicating with school kids and have found meaning in doing so. They are excited and each group now has a chart of the region and will be following my progress. Both John Welsford and I have been conducting live stream classroom sessions while he was here in Chile, which I will follow up with sat phone calls as I can.

    I am quite intrigued by the challenge of managing a small boat here as I believe small does not necessarily equate with unfit or unsafe. A sound small boat in conservative hands can do some amazing things, it's all about patience. I am employing a specific voyaging strategy based on a previous small boat experience I had south of here that worked very nicely. I have built my small wooden boat for this endeavor because I believe it's smart. I can also field repair a wooden boat far more easily than one of other materials.

    I do find it unfortunate that some label me an idiot, fool, self serving, a publicity hound or that they simply don't support me or what I am doing. I believe its the boat size that trips them up. Well I haven't asked for support and I happen to believe in small boats as mentioned. Naysayers will be naysayers, every initiative taken on in life has them. Dissenting opinion is important and if seen in a positive light can actually help make what we do stronger.

    I have only been public about my plans to help the Dave Nichols/John Welsford film initiative. I am also shooting film and turning it over to them on my return, simple as that. I suppose going public means one must be ready for what comes with the territory of public scrutiny.

    I have not asked for sponsorship yet at the same time I recognize how great it is that so much has been offered to me by those friends who perhaps see a grain of value in what I am doing or hope to make my voyage a little safer. I hope their lives are an iota richer because of this and I am thankful for each and every one of them.

    Perhaps there is something of value in trying and even failing. I figure many folks just don't try. I may not get further than a mile out of Punta Arenas, who knows. The joy for me is in the doing and not the end result.

    Big boat sailors voyaging in the remotest places on the planet are rarely labeled as stunt hounds. I just happen to believe that for this part of the world a small boat makes good sense. I may lack some creature comforts afforded by larger boats but I can also sleep well at night knowing I am tucked tight in a small cove or up on land somewhere and not hanging on hope at anchor as williwaws roar down out of the mountains.

    There are many paths up the mountain of wisdom and freedom of expression. I respect them all as long as they are pure of heart and do not harm others. To each his own. I thank everyone here who has shown interest and perhaps gleaned even an ounce of inspiration from my little project.

    Life is full of dangerous moments and risk. I believe the biggest risk of all is avoiding change and challenge. Frozen by fear many of us are not living out our dreams deferring them to someday. This is life and not a rehearsal, I figure it's best to get on with it, whatever our particular it is.

    With respect to all from the SV Southern Cross.
    [IMG][/IMG]
    Last edited by Howard Rice; 01-18-2017 at 04:04 PM.

  19. #69
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    looking good, Bon' Voyage!

    just noticing in this last shot... (at her garboards) Scamp has a Clipper Bow

  20. #70
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    I'll say it again Howard: Vaya con Dios!
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  21. #71
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    You go Howard. All the best. Your approach to it, and your voyage are inspiring to a lot of us. Looking forward to updates.

  22. #72
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Good luck and bon voyage.
    There is no rational, logical, or physical description of how free will could exist. It therefore makes no sense to praise or condemn anyone on the grounds they are a free willed self that made one choice but could have chosen something else. There is no evidence that such a situation is possible in our Universe. Demonstrate otherwise and I will be thrilled.

  23. #73
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Yes indeed! Fair winds - well at least as fair as one can expect where you are!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  24. #74
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Howard, all the best and bon voyage. This whole venture is inspiring.
    Peter

  25. #75
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    I also wish you good weather and peace of mind, it seems you and your boat are well prepared so GO FOR IT!!

    Greetings from wintery Germany,

    Alan.

  26. #76
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Have fun -- and see to your anchors!

  27. #77
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    All the very best Howard - fantastic adventure!

    Rick

  28. #78
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Bon Voyage, Howard!




    Steven

  29. #79
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Grit: you've got it!

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  30. #80
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hadfield View Post
    Have fun -- and see to your anchors!
    Two Northill anchors Dave, big for the size of boat and rigged so they can be instantly deployed plus he has two smaller ones and a pair of screw type sand anchors for use on shore. He's got good brakes on that little ship!

    John Welsford.
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  31. #81
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    God speed to you, Howard. We look forward to hearing your tales in person some day after your return to Michigan.

  32. #82
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Fair winds!

  33. #83
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    Default

    Howard, good luck!!! I will offer my rosary today for your safety.

  34. #84
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    I had an email from Howard this morning, the last piece of the jigsaw is in place now. He'd been awaiting a pair of Spyderco knives kindly donated by the company. In the rush to get Southern Cross in her crate and to the shipping company after several unexpected things had delayed his preparation, he'd been unable to fetch a gear box and his stores box to include it in the items being shipped, two knives being a part of what was left behind.

    Sal and his crew shipped two knives at no cost, the freight cost far exceeding the cost of the knives themselves, and they arrived today.
    Coincidentally there was no wind today, it happens, and is often a sign that a big blow is imminent so its tomorrow am departure but only if the weather is right.

    Another happy happening, is that our friend at the Armada de Chile Captain Herrera, Zone Commander and Port Captain was promoted at Christmas time, congratulations sir! We'd developed a good relationship with him and his senior officers which began during our February visit to Punta Arenas. Howard had gone to much trouble to keep the Armada informed as to his intentions and preparations which was very much appreciated by the authorities. To sail in this area requires a special permit and usually an inspection of the vessel, and its the Navy who do this.
    Howard has now met the new Zone Commander and his four senior officers, they very much appreciate the effort made to keep them informed and are going to go and look over "Southern Cross" today, not for a formal inspection but to satisfy their personal curiosity.
    They've also waived any fees involved should Howard require assistance, thats very unusual!

    Here is a little quote from Howard about the knives.

    The last piece of my voyaging puzzle is now in place.
    Thank you Spyderco, Sal Glesser, Joyce Laituri and Dave Scobie of Sage Marine. My life is blessed by so many friends.
    You buy the best and you get the best! I am just plain humbled."

    John Welsford
    Below40South.com
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  35. #85
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Excellent knives too! A little Spyderco Ladybug is my everyday carry.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  36. #86
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Thank you Howard for keeping alive the spirit of "the dreamers of the day". Good luck.

  37. #87
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Thanks to all for your interest in my voyage.
    I'm on my way with todays afternoon high tide. Day one will be a challenge as late day winds are forecast at 40 knots. If all goes well I hope to make Pta Lenadura. Three months of supplies on board and a wilderness to explore.


    If anyone is interested, beginning tomorrow you can view updates on the site "below40south.com" as I will be attempting to check in via satellite phone and Delorme and will do my best to help John and Dave make the film they envision.

    I would like to thank the many friends who have made this voyage possible. I could not have done this without you and wouldn't have the opportunity to share the experience via film. I am inspired by your heart and humbled by your thoughtfulness. I am also honored to have such a fine relationship with the Armada de Chile. A fine well organized navy that has my best interest first and foremost in their minds. If sailors follow the simple Armada protocol then many possibilities exist for meaningful experiences. Thanks Gentlemen!

    Ciao!

    ][/IMG]

  38. #88
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Great photo. Have a good one. Enjoy it, and im sure many hope the cameras keep rolling so others can share your adventure.

  39. #89
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    All the best Howard.

    Seems I have look in here just in time to read about your setting off. You obviously know what you are doing, who h has got to be the most important thing of all.

    Updates from here on will most interesting, despite the fact that I know for sure I would not survive a swim in the cold water you are quite willingly planning to dive into.

  40. #90
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by Lugalong View Post
    All the best Howard.

    Seems I have look in here just in time to read about your setting off. You obviously know what you are doing, who h has got to be the most important thing of all.

    Updates from here on will most interesting, despite the fact that I know for sure I would not survive a swim in the cold water you are quite willingly planning to dive into.
    Howard has an extraordinary drysuit from Ocean Rodeo, its unlike any drysuit that Iv'e ever seen before, can be worn in reasonable comfort for days, and has both active and standby modes, the latter sealing off his bottom half and having the head, neck and front all connected up, rolled inside the front of the jacket and able to be pulled up and sealed in seconds.
    This is a seriously good piece of kit.

    Thanks Ocean Rodeo for the product, and Small Craft Advisor magazine for donating it.
    https://oceanrodeo.com/drywear/sport.../soul/?b=50033

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  41. #91
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Howard has every piece of paper all completed, stores aboard, sails bent on and has been ready to go for the past three days.
    But, its neap tides in Punta Arenas right now, and he's been unable to get out over the bar of the little estuary, so when I spoke to him today he was about to unload the boat, has six big burly guys coming and they'll manhaul it across to the sea where he'll load her and will be off on the next tide.

    At last.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  42. #92
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by john welsford View Post
    Howard has an extraordinary drysuit from Ocean Rodeo, its unlike any drysuit that Iv'e ever seen before, can be worn in reasonable comfort for days, and has both active and standby modes, the latter sealing off his bottom half and having the head, neck and front all connected up, rolled inside the front of the jacket and able to be pulled up and sealed in seconds.
    This is a seriously good piece of kit.

    Thanks Ocean Rodeo for the product, and Small Craft Advisor magazine for donating it.
    https://oceanrodeo.com/drywear/sport.../soul/?b=50033

    John Welsford

    Thanks John, that bit of kit sounds like being a lot better than a wetsuit, which is all I am familiar with for immersion in cold water. Finding one at Sally's is going to be a problem though. I'm imagining that getting into and out of the drysuit has got to be easier than a wetsuit too.

  43. #93
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    Whangarei New Zealand
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    313

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by Howard Rice View Post
    To friends here and those whom I have not yet met.

    Tomorrow in the early dawn I will set out on the high tide.

    My time here is short and so I am taking this moment to say Thanks to all who have shared in my vision of sailing a small wooden boat south on the Strait of Magellan.

    For the Woodenboat public record:
    I am not voyaging in an under 12 foot wooden boat to prove a point or discover anything other than in myself. I am simply curious about the region and my insignificant place in it. If there is an underlying mission then it is to communicate with kids via tracking and sat phone with updates as I voyage. For the past year I have been communicating with school kids and have found meaning in doing so. They are excited and each group now has a chart of the region and will be following my progress. Both John Welsford and I have been conducting live stream classroom sessions while he was here in Chile, which I will follow up with sat phone calls as I can.

    I am quite intrigued by the challenge of managing a small boat here as I believe small does not necessarily equate with unfit or unsafe. A sound small boat in conservative hands can do some amazing things, it's all about patience. I am employing a specific voyaging strategy based on a previous small boat experience I had south of here that worked very nicely. I have built my small wooden boat for this endeavor because I believe it's smart. I can also field repair a wooden boat far more easily than one of other materials.

    I do find it unfortunate that some label me an idiot, fool, self serving, a publicity hound or that they simply don't support me or what I am doing. I believe its the boat size that trips them up. Well I haven't asked for support and I happen to believe in small boats as mentioned. Naysayers will be naysayers, every initiative taken on in life has them. Dissenting opinion is important and if seen in a positive light can actually help make what we do stronger.

    I have only been public about my plans to help the Dave Nichols/John Welsford film initiative. I am also shooting film and turning it over to them on my return, simple as that. I suppose going public means one must be ready for what comes with the territory of public scrutiny.

    I have not asked for sponsorship yet at the same time I recognize how great it is that so much has been offered to me by those friends who perhaps see a grain of value in what I am doing or hope to make my voyage a little safer. I hope their lives are an iota richer because of this and I am thankful for each and every one of them.

    Perhaps there is something of value in trying and even failing. I figure many folks just don't try. I may not get further than a mile out of Punta Arenas, who knows. The joy for me is in the doing and not the end result.

    Big boat sailors voyaging in the remotest places on the planet are rarely labeled as stunt hounds. I just happen to believe that for this part of the world a small boat makes good sense. I may lack some creature comforts afforded by larger boats but I can also sleep well at night knowing I am tucked tight in a small cove or up on land somewhere and not hanging on hope at anchor as williwaws roar down out of the mountains.

    There are many paths up the mountain of wisdom and freedom of expression. I respect them all as long as they are pure of heart and do not harm others. To each his own. I thank everyone here who has shown interest and perhaps gleaned even an ounce of inspiration from my little project.

    Life is full of dangerous moments and risk. I believe the biggest risk of all is avoiding change and challenge. Frozen by fear many of us are not living out our dreams deferring them to someday. This is life and not a rehearsal, I figure it's best to get on with it, whatever our particular it is.

    With respect to all from the SV Southern Cross.
    [IMG]







    [/IMG]
    Explaining how the size of your most fine little boat allows for hauling onto the hard for rest, sounds like a very good reason for going small, rather than the small size being anything of a stunt. Here' s hoping that many people will gain useful knowledge and inspiration from what you are doing Howard....especially the young ones

  44. #94
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Fair winds Howard, as others have already stated - you really are a terrific inspiration!!! I look forward to following your adventure.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  45. #95
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
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    5,364

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by john welsford View Post
    Howard has every piece of paper all completed, stores aboard, sails bent on and has been ready to go for the past three days.
    But, its neap tides in Punta Arenas right now, and he's been unable to get out over the bar of the little estuary, so when I spoke to him today he was about to unload the boat, has six big burly guys coming and they'll manhaul it across to the sea where he'll load her and will be off on the next tide.

    At last.

    John Welsford
    hmmm wondering if he might use his equipment for dragging her ashore to drag her over the bar, does he have any fenders that could be used as rollers aboard? how about rigging the two shroud winches and a block and tackle to an anchor and dragging her out?... Just thinking out loud... especially since there isn't room for those 6 burly guys to sail with him for future haul outs

  46. #96
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    Northern NSW Australia
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    57,855

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Bon Voyage, stay safe Howard .....and Happy Birthday !
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  47. #97
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hamilton New Zealand
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    3,306

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    hmmm wondering if he might use his equipment for dragging her ashore to drag her over the bar, does he have any fenders that could be used as rollers aboard? how about rigging the two shroud winches and a block and tackle to an anchor and dragging her out?... Just thinking out loud... especially since there isn't room for those 6 burly guys to sail with him for future haul outs
    He has three of Duckworks excellent beach rollers, a big block and tackle, plus a comealong. But on his own he was not able to heave her up a 2 ft high shelf of very soft sand.
    So it was unload, heave ho with six men, note that four can carry the boat fairly easily when unloaded, and into the water on the other side.
    As I write he's anchored in the shallows of the beach with a fairly easy offshore wind, and will be loaded up and gone within an hour or two.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  48. #98
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hamilton New Zealand
    Posts
    3,306

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by Lugalong View Post
    Thanks John, that bit of kit sounds like being a lot better than a wetsuit, which is all I am familiar with for immersion in cold water. Finding one at Sally's is going to be a problem though. I'm imagining that getting into and out of the drysuit has got to be easier than a wetsuit too.
    I've worn several wetsuits, two different drysuits and found all of them pretty uncomfortable after a few hours.
    The Ocean Rodeo one was a revelation, if you are serious I'd suggest that you contact them and ask all the questions that you can think of.

    Yes they've helped with a special deal for this venture, and Small Craft Advisor has paid that deal, but I'd not wave their flag if I was not seriously impressed.
    There is one in my future.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  49. #99
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
    5,244

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by john welsford View Post
    He has three of Duckworks excellent beach rollers, a big block and tackle, plus a comealong. But on his own he was not able to heave her up a 2 ft high shelf of very soft sand.
    So it was unload, heave ho with six men, note that four can carry the boat fairly easily when unloaded, and into the water on the other side.
    As I write he's anchored in the shallows of the beach with a fairly easy offshore wind, and will be loaded up and gone within an hour or two.

    John Welsford
    If he was truly stuck I'd bet Howard would find a way over the shelf of soft sand. But why would he do that when he has a better solution at hand in the form of willing assistance? He chose wisely. I'm sure he'll find the right solution to whatever he comes across over the rest of the voyage.
    When I first joined WBF they made me write a book to prove I was a real yachty. I was so gullible.
    Paperback E-book

  50. #100
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hamilton New Zealand
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    3,306

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    I heard from him by satellite phone last night my time, he's got his little ship up on the beach on his inflatable beach rollers waiting out a series of bad weather fronts. He needs three or four days of good weather to make it out to where he'll find the next really workable safe harbour.

    He's in good spirits and doing ok.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

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