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Thread: Designs for old codgers

  1. #386
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt young View Post
    Dave,

    Your insight and experience is good. I understand the need to flex the body when you paddle. As with many things this is a balance of personal desires for the best situation, and for a given person.

    In my mind to break it down, Meade's seat is a great sailing and lounging seat. Horton's and Axel's are good paddling and sailing seats, and somewhat OK lounging seats. LFH tried to come up with a seat that held your upper backbody and also allowed the shoulders to flex independently. It does this I can attest to, I love the flex I get from my version of his seat. I will note I don't see many modern versions of his seat plan in action. The core of his design, ,as I can tell, is the pivot bar is is low enough to allow the upper back to expand beyond it, to not get trapped down low. Most larger modern seats I see do not have this flex in them. Where I ended, with my version of his seat, is the lower piece of plywood, that gives the seat its sheer strength, also supports my lower back very well. I then have the back rest available for lounging and full press support, which is also independently actuated.

    But please understand this is very much a work in progress, I am testing here and not professing at all and open to input.

    Also, I get what you mean by the good low paddling support some of the better modern seats give, along with full body flex. But one of my issues with them is that there is no lounging position available for the paddler. This is a position I appreciate, I really like being able to layback. And I would think any codger who is out paddling might enjoy also. I am not out to do lots of miles, but am enjoying myself.
    Thanks Matt, please could you post a photo of you seat

  2. #387
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Hi Matt

    yes, I also please would like to see more details about your seat.

    The ingenious Meade Gougeon / Hugh Horton seat was developed for sailing, and paddling with a solo or double paddle. It is a clever engineered piece of art:
    https://www.bootsbaugarage.ch/hugh/h_essay9_en.htm
    Meade's high seat back was developed because he found out he could take some minute naps in it.
    I am using a double paddle a lot, and yes, my seat back is just low enough that I can still rotate my torso when I sit in my seat in the "upright" position. Plans for a DIY version are available for free: https://www.bootsbaugarage.ch/produkte.htm

    Generally, the seat opens new possibilities for us. With a comfortable seat and a backrest, I cannot sail or paddle better, but I can do it longer, much longer. About 16 hours a day, if needed. And that is all I need to make distance.

    Think comfort it is an important part of the sailing codgerdome. Together with a very low sitting position that translates into stability in any small boat.


    Cheers! Axel
    Last edited by canoe_sailor; 04-09-2017 at 07:49 AM.

  3. #388
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Axel I really like the look of the Horton seat, I would love to try one. I will most likely make one. Here are some pictures of the seat I made for my paddle board, this is the prototype I 'll be making a new one this year. I have tried a couple different methods to attach it to the paddleboard. I attached the front cross piece out at the sheer, This worked fine, but I like to keep the deck at the sheer on the board as low as possible in the center of the board , for easiest paddling sitting or SUPing. In this picture I have dowels that attach to my leeboard thwart. I did this so I could swing the seat from side to side while sailing, it was good to be able to do this, but I actually preferred having my seat in the center of the beam, leaning over while pushing the sail hard worked just fine. I have really like this seat I think it has great support and comfort. . The crossbar and back bars sit in a great spot for my back. I can flex my back back nicely evenly or one shoulder at a time, the crossbar pivots to allow easy movement. Or I power forward with good support, while paddling The lumbar board it good, and necessary for lateral strength. It needs to be more prominent though. I will change the on the next on, or maybe a cushion there? It can unbuckle and lay flat, depending how I attach it, its possible to flip it forward while SUPing. I would be nice to raise the seat up, more Horton style. I will do that with the next one, as it will be for canoe use. For the paddleboard I want my weight as low as possible, as I am already almost 4" off the bottom. I'll do a new lower seat for it. I had to take a selfie for the backshot. But I does demonstrate the movement of the backboards, it was comfortable. The shot of it on the board was before i added the backboard, it is setup to flip forward for SUPing. This sear is totally inspires by LFH's seat. But not a perfect copy by far. He has the backcross board curved to match the back. I'll have to try that out.












  4. #389
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    Thanks Matt, looks like a good development direction. Started looking into chair anthropomorphics, I think you would need access to the original books, which are expensive to find more useful data. I was thinking of profiling the lumber support of my car seat as a starting point. I figured I could build up the profile with different layers of camping mat glued to a flat plywood sheet. One issue I find is the thickness of my lifejacket which completely throws any upper back support haywire.
    This is one anthropogenic sketch I found, this is 50th percentile male dimensions in inches (with cm in brackets). Interesting to note that support should be avoided it the bottom 3 inches which the Meade Gougeon / Hugh Horton seat appears to have taken into account.



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  5. #390
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt young View Post
    But the biggest issue for me in higher winds and rougher water, which i do enjoy sailing the board in, is that the low bow volume is an issue. I can dig the nose in when pushing hard into waves, with the lake chop I usually am sailing in I usually pierce through, but have had a couple close calls with following seas pushing me deeper. I am rebuilding mine now, replacing the transom with a pointed stern that should help. For me it has been a tight line to walk between a board that paddles well and cuts through chop efficiently and a board that has good bow volume to rise over waves.
    The surf ski deals with this with a very wide upward flare over the bow. I was attracted to my sailing kayak because it has a huge bulbous bow compartment which deflects water and can never submarine. But the stern can skid around from following waves and it has strong lee helm in a blow, esp when not sailing.




    P.S. can't you turn burying your bow into something fun like this?

    Last edited by rudderless; 04-09-2017 at 04:43 PM.

  6. #391
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Hi Matt, tink

    and thanks for your input. Yes, I found that design approach in Herreshoff's "Sensible Cruising Designs", p. 11-12. He wrote: "It is necessary that the slats of the back rest be arranged to pivot separately...".
    Think I have to try that. Another prototype... it will not be ready tomorrow, but I promise to report about that.

    Have also experienced digging the nose or the stern in waves. Sailing canoes need some more "reserve buoyancy", that is volume above the waterline, and that behaviour disappears completely.

    Cheers! Axel
    Last edited by canoe_sailor; 04-10-2017 at 02:27 PM.

  7. #392
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Can you explain why the "slats have to pivot separately"?

    I can't imagine the need.Perhaps I don't understand how they would pivot.

  8. #393
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    "... or else bend, for in paddling, the back at the shoulder blades twists from side to side with the strokes."

    Herreshoff, Sensible Cruising design, p.11

  9. #394
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    My copy of Sensible Cruising Design arrived today, will try and get my head around it. Still can't figure out the life jacket issue yet. Sat in the bottom of the canoe and the bottom of the life jacket sits exactly on the yoke and rides up uncomfortably. Clearly I would not use yoke as a backrest just use it as a point of reference. It is almost as if the top half needs to be recessed the thickness of the life jacket.

  10. #395
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Look at the LJ's recommended for kayaking. I use an manual inflatable myself.

  11. #396
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Tink, the 3" of no support on the lower portion of the seat back is a good point, I will try that out. Yeah life jackets are a factor. I have a couple different kinds, not surprisingly the one that works the best for me is a high end kayaking desgn. It doesn't ride up. The inflatables seam to be a good option, I have a belt style inflatable one that we use for paddle boarding, there we are more concerned with the law not really neededing one as the board is a good flotation devise and we are fairly close to shore. Axel I have been enjoying sailing my plastic canoe as it has decent bow volume, but I am looking forward to building a sailing canoe next. Rudderless, oh yeah I totally do that pirouette move all the time just for fun, not really.
    Last edited by Matt young; 04-10-2017 at 11:35 PM.

  12. #397
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    I have a Double Paddle Canoe with a ~3" x 9" cushioned pad at approximately the height of my kidneys, attached to a cross beam. It seems to be at exactly the right height. It gives me good lower back support without restricting my ability to move my upper body for maintaining stability in a seaway.

  13. #398
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt young View Post
    Tink, the 3" of no support on the lower portion of the seat back is a good point, I will try that out. Yeah life jackets are a factor. I have a couple different kinds, not surprisingly the one that works the best for me is a high end kayaking desgn. It doesn't ride up.
    I have a real issue with buoyancy aids and riding up when I am dinghy racing and ultimately end up using it in anger. Over the years I have developed a small pot belly. I think manufacturers only design for athletic types. The only way to stop the ride up is to really tighten the chest straps. When you end up in the water there is a involuntary reaction of taking a very deep breath with is then restricted. My daughters buoyancy aid has crotch straps, no issues of riding up, you can't buy an adult Buoyancy Aid with these straps. I have now found the solution of wearing a spandex top over the buoyancy aid, this gives equal compression all over the jacket and goes will past the bottom of the jacket and stops any ride up. World class high performance dinghy sailors do the same thing to improve their aerodynamics, I think everyone at the club thinks I am being a prat and showing off but I feel very secure in the water.

    I had a good look at canoe / kayak buoyancy aids yesterday. They look fantastic, have even bigger shoulder holes than dinghy buoyancy aids and rely a strap at the near for compression again. I would still need to wear my spandex top so all the fancy pockets would be a bit useless.

    Still thinking about an inflatable life jacket. Never seen anyone canoe in one for forty years. It would be comfortable especially on hot days but if it was inflated I think getting back on the canoe would be an issue.

  14. #399
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Why not add a crotch strap to an existing PDF: http://www.lifejackets.co.uk/categor...-crotch-straps
    or https://www.jimmygreen.co.uk/product...et-accessories

    This one has the option of a crotch strap: http://www.nookie.co.uk/rivermonster...r-buoyancy-aid

    Glad I'm not the only one with a belly getting in the way...........

  15. #400
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Valley View Post
    Why not add a crotch strap to an existing PDF: http://www.lifejackets.co.uk/categor...-crotch-straps
    or https://www.jimmygreen.co.uk/product...et-accessories

    This one has the option of a crotch strap: http://www.nookie.co.uk/rivermonster...r-buoyancy-aid

    Glad I'm not the only one with a belly getting in the way...........
    Precisely what I intend to do with mine.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  16. #401
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    Not the cup of tea of all old codgers I am sure, but there are a lot of floundering performance dinghies that would make a great donor for a trimaran project. This guy has used an old ISO

    A quick scan on Apolloduck reveals a gold mine for under 1500, ISO, B14, Blaze to name a few.
    There are 4 ISOs less than 1000, the expensive ones coming with two mains, two jibs and 3 spinnakers.

    Clearly you might want to reduce the sail area but many come with multiple sails




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  17. #402
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    That's not even a Trimaran - it only has 2 hulls - so its a proa.

    The pity for this is that you now don't need the original width of the dingy. It's just extra drag and weight.
    Reduce the sail area? Sacrilege!

    But you might have a problem with the mast not being well enough supported on starboard tack.

  18. #403
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by rudderless View Post
    Modular plastic boats from Pointe 65 were my first codger purchase. They don't nest as well as above, but I would go thru a small elevator with kayak pieces jangling from shoulder straps. Next time I will try to fit some suitcase wheels on it, but for some reason besides the fact I am heavy for it, I prefer my fleet of inflatables. EDIT: Oh, now I remember the joints cannot stand up to much flexing in sizeable waves.

    They have a full line of modular sit-in and sit-on-top kayaks and a SUP for which they often email me a half price offer. You can insert extra center sections when you want more than one seat - there is a video of a kayak extended to 99 occupants.

    As a former dealer of the .65 modular kayaks I think the main feature of them is a product that can be shipped direct to customers in sections that UPS can deliver economically bypassing brick and mortar shops. The marketing that it's easier to transport to the water by car for those without roof racks is rendered somewhat irrelevant when the entire inside of the car is filled. Also the manufacturer states the boats have limited wave handling capability, which we and customers discovered. I had a Tequila tandem simply come apart when carried 150' to the water. The customer pays more for a boat that weighs more than a single hull yet is severely limited in wave handling for the tandem models.

  19. #404
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by LeeG View Post
    The marketing that it's easier to transport to the water by car for those without roof racks is rendered somewhat irrelevant when the entire inside of the car is filled. Also the manufacturer states the boats have limited wave handling capability, which we and customers discovered. I had a Tequila tandem simply come apart when carried 150' to the water.
    What's wrong with filling the entire car? You must be thinking of a McMansion full of family members to bring along and a garage to store boats. Think more like a lone mission to escape the nursing home once in a while

    I do admit I can fit larger 4 passenger inflatable sailboats in my hatchback with less blocking of the center mirror view than with my Tequila. I had already mentioned the wave limitation which the mfr boldly notes in manual, but I survived a steep breaking 8' wave. My detachment problem wasn't being too easy but too hard, if shorebreak washed a bunch of sand into the gap. Mine sits unused behind my couch waiting to be the star of the show, when I can't or won't drive. No outside storage is needed, and I can carry it in pieces thru our tiny elevator all the way out to water - with shoulder straps or tiny dolly wheels.

    This reminds me of putting a nested sailing/rowing dinghy in a hatchback or SUV. Especially it living back there; you may not have an inch of other storage space as a downsized codger. I mentioned a folding RIB sailing dinghy that was just too wide for wheelwells. I also mentioned a 11' nesting sail/row dinghy, but here is another one from PT Watercraft: the PT 11. It looks really impressive and the sailing videos are thrilling. I am not sure but it appears the front half half has floor raised so doesn't need separate bailing, and the slanting sides allow a sweeping motion of your hand to substitute for a bailing device. Better yet the slanting sides allow the boat to accommodate wheel wells better.



    On the minus side it also doesn't have mast broken down into short enough sections. A major drawback compared to the previous 11' nester is that they didn't finesse the nesting to fit under 6 feet long. They show it just fitting in a SUV bed, but I bet the driver seat can't slide and tilt massively back like my height needs and can do with my inflatable sailing dinghy or catamaran. I guess it is meant to go in a pickup for short periods and not sit locked and hidden (w/ car cover) in a crime prone area the rest of the time.
    Last edited by rudderless; 04-19-2017 at 07:37 AM.

  20. #405
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by upchurchmr View Post
    That's not even a Trimaran - it only has 2 hulls - so its a proa.

    The pity for this is that you now don't need the original width of the dingy. It's just extra drag and weight.
    Reduce the sail area? Sacrilege!

    But you might have a problem with the mast not being well enough supported on starboard tack.
    He hasn't finished the 2nd hull yet, he went out and tested it like this and says it is fine, him and his wife are lightweights. He is going to raise the Ama to improve light wind performance. The mast is held up by the original rigging.

    I appreciate it is far from an ideal solution, extra drag etc but it is a quick and easy use of a boat that is of little value

    The whole thing is telescopic and fits into a dinghy space

  21. #406
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    Off on a tangent or maybe close to a solution. I have been driving and cycling around on dream of my retirement sailing area Strangford Lough in Northern Ireland



    In addition to this great lough there are two other substantial inland Loughs

    A canoe would be great in the right conditions but a small sailing dinghy would be ideal. Many ideas for easing a dinghy onto a roof rack have been designed but I ultimately think a trailer is a better solution. Everything is kept in the boat ready to go etc.

    So the question, what schemes to people have when dealing with the negative issues of trailers: weight, just a trailer or launching trolley as well , dealing with boat afloat and having to recover / store trailer, storing / security of trailer when off sailing - especially at crowded and tiny launch sites. I am sure there are more.


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  22. #407
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Tink,

    You might look at the Bufflehead Sailing Canoe by Hugh Horton.
    Google Gougeon Epoxyworks and look for Horton articles.
    About 40# hull and 70# full up.

    No need for a trailer.

    Meade Gougeon previously sailed one and he is almost 80 yo.

  23. #408
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by upchurchmr View Post
    Tink,

    You might look at the Bufflehead Sailing Canoe by Hugh Horton.
    Google Gougeon Epoxyworks and look for Horton articles.
    About 40# hull and 70# full up.

    No need for a trailer.

    Meade Gougeon previously sailed one and he is almost 80 yo.
    Thanks, I have read that article and I do like what Meade has achieved. For the EC 2017 the photos (post 324) show Elderly Care on a trailer. I just like the trailer because it eliminates any packaging and unpacking of the boat if you are organised enough. Whatever can be done to eliminate fatigue and maximise time on the water has to be a goal to me.

    I added a sailing rig to my 12' x 30" open canoe, went out twice and have now permanently removed it. Perhaps if I had tried it earlier in my life I might have got on better with it. I get that you can add outriggers etc but a simple 12 foot dinghy, standing lug, spars store in the boat, good set of oars is more who and where I am.

  24. #409
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    This is what I would like to put on my trailer, 11' 6"


    http://jwboatdesigns.co.nz/plans/truant/




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  25. #410
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    I recently saw a Shell 14 on a local lake.
    Very simple, looked light, using a leg-o-mutton sail.
    Sailed nicely in company with larger boats.

    http://www.shellboats.com/index.html

    There is a picture of a 12 at the bottom.

    http://sailingtexas.com/201701/sswifty14105.html this is the boat I saw.

  26. #411
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    I just like the trailer because it eliminates any packaging and unpacking of the boat if you are organised enough. Whatever can be done to eliminate fatigue and maximise time on the water has to be a goal to me.
    I agree with you 100% on this. The small boat I trailer sail weighs around 75 pounds empty, and not a whole lot more with masts, oars, etc. in it. It's very easy to pull back up onto the trailer by hand if the ramp is shallow. A couple of times, lacking a ramp, two of us just picked it up and carried it to the water. I could roll it on a pair of strap-on wheels I have made for kayaks and canoes, but have never needed to. The boat is a Redmond Whisp, which has shortcomings as a geezer boat that I'm working on. (Thread here.) But in this category of boat, lightness is your friend. Makes the boat easier to row, too. And being light does not necessarily mean being short and slow. The Whisp is just under 16' and will lift up and plane when conditions are right. I wouldn't put down this feature as a requirement, but it can be achieved.

    I'm able to roll the boat into the back of my double-width garage and put it against the back wall sideways, still leaving room for the cars. (Another advantage of lightness, I can even push boat and trailer up a gentle slope.) Keeping a boat like this outdoors can work if the cover is well designed so the rain doesn't get in and ventilation is good -- very good. It doesn't hurt to load it with things that keep out the bugs and rodents if it's to be left for any length of time. "Mothballing" becomes a bit more literal. My particular boat lived under a shed about 15 feet from the Maine high tide line for about 15 years, and didn't suffer from the exposure. Epoxy and paint over good ply are more durable than we have any reason to expect. This same boat is now 30 years old and has no structural problems.
    Last edited by Woxbox; 04-19-2017 at 07:01 PM.
    -Dave

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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by upchurchmr View Post
    I recently saw a Shell 14 on a local lake.
    Very simple, looked light, using a leg-o-mutton sail.
    Sailed nicely in company with larger boats.
    Thanks; earlier I could only find one other Shell Swifty 14 on the internet, and I think they built it for looks and never got it wet! In several videos Fred Shell lets you know his Swifty 12 may be his greatest and most popular accomplishment, but I'm lots bigger than him and surely would benefit from a 14 if I could. Fred recently upgraded his 12 design with a higher aspect sail with a mast pocket above the legbone... something maybe to look into for the 14' since he says it works great. Also he has simplified the deck construction per https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTicN_rAFzY&t=84s . The pictured 14 seems to lack the usual Shell oarlocks and high coaming.

    I sometimes wish I retired in tax haven of South Padre Island, TX in one of those small condos with a boat slip (local taxes based on real estate rather than income). I could overcome their poor grocery supply with amazon deliveries, and sail my brains out most every day in that Swifty.
    Last edited by rudderless; 04-20-2017 at 02:52 AM.

  28. #413
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by Woxbox View Post
    I agree with you 100% on this. The small boat I trailer sail weighs around 75 pounds empty, and not a whole lot more with masts, oars, etc. in it. It's very easy to pull back up onto the trailer by hand if the ramp is shallow. A couple of times, lacking a ramp, two of us just picked it up and carried it to the water. I could roll it on a pair of strap-on wheels I have made for kayaks and canoes, but have never needed to. The boat is a Redmond Whisp, which has shortcomings as a geezer boat that I'm working on. (Thread here.) But in this category of boat, lightness is your friend. Makes the boat easier to row, too. And being light does not necessarily mean being short and slow. The Whisp is just under 16' and will lift up and plane when conditions are right. I wouldn't put down this feature as a requirement, but it can be achieved.

    I'm able to roll the boat into the back of my double-width garage and put it against the back wall sideways, still leaving room for the cars. (Another advantage of lightness, I can even push boat and trailer up a gentle slope.) Keeping a boat like this outdoors can work if the cover is well designed so the rain doesn't get in and ventilation is good -- very good. It doesn't hurt to load it with things that keep out the bugs and rodents if it's to be left for any length of time. "Mothballing" becomes a bit more literal. My particular boat lived under a shed about 15 feet from the Maine high tide line for about 15 years, and didn't suffer from the exposure. Epoxy and paint over good ply are more durable than we have any reason to expect. This same boat is now 30 years old and has no structural problems.
    Strap on wheels may well work. Traditional launching trolleys have the beam from the wheels to the bow which is a job that can be done by the hull. There is no reason why the boat can't have features to locate and help secure the wheels. Where the traditional launching trolley does has a big advantage is recovery. We are however talking about boats where dropping the sail and rowing the last few hundred feet would be easy. We are not talking about a tippy fully rigged racing dinghy.

    The rollers they use on the EC might be good and could then be strapped in for buoyancy. Older U.K. Dinghies all relied on inflatable buoyancy bags but has now gone out of fashion.

    Like what you are doing to the Whisp, looks like google seaman like solutions. The dagger board with the foam will be fine. I had an International Canoe with as slot four inches too long and the gap was filled with PU foam, the sort used in buildings for insulation. In my case the board was in a pivotable cassette. I little bit of ply on the side of the foam touching the board might prove useful. Good luck, I have subscribed to the thread and look forward to developments.

  29. #414
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by upchurchmr View Post
    I recently saw a Shell 14 on a local lake.
    Very simple, looked light, using a leg-o-mutton sail.
    Sailed nicely in company with larger boats.

    http://www.shellboats.com/index.html

    There is a picture of a 12 at the bottom.

    http://sailingtexas.com/201701/sswifty14105.html this is the boat I saw.
    http://zippybean.com/
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...2421-Swifty-14
    I feel the 12 is a bit narrow but the 14 has gone far too wide.
    I think with 3 planks and the bottom and very little twist in the planks there is two much cut away at the bow.
    IMHO Truant is a much more appealing shape.
    Lovely flickr album of a Truant build here
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/190070...th/4719325819/

  30. #415
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    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    What a great thread started by a sadly departed member. Maybe a lesson to be decisive in pursuing your boating dreams while you can.

    I think someone else's post here scolded me to not forget to review the multi mode Kayacat. There are brief reviews on their facebook page, and from there you can find a closed facebook group with more detailed (although confused) reviews. I am still on waitlist after 7 months, althou they advertise 4-6 week wait. Well, it's because I ordered every single option except electric drive. Meanwhile they have time to debug mfg and I have time to lose excess weight over their max payload limit

  31. #416
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Decatur, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    170

    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by rudderless View Post
    What a great thread started by a sadly departed member. Maybe a lesson to be decisive in pursuing your boating dreams while you can. ...
    Yes! I'll be sixty-seven years old in October, and just this spring acquired the second member of my fleet, a Sea Pearl 21.



    She's only got wood as trim, but I considered the time I might spend building something of similar capability, such as a Caledonia Yawl, and decided to get something in the water this year. Maybe next year I'll start that build.

    P.S. Here's my "first love," a Phil Bolger designed Teal, build by yours truly back in 1981, in the basement boat shop, getting her beauty treatments:



    Happy trails!

  32. #417
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,785

    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Noto View Post
    Yes! I'll be sixty-seven years old in October, and just this spring acquired the second member of my fleet, a Sea Pearl 21.



    She's only got wood as trim, but I considered the time I might spend building something of similar capability, such as a Caledonia Yawl, and decided to get something in the water this year. Maybe next year I'll start that build.

    P.S. Here's my "first love," a Phil Bolger designed Teal, build by yours truly back in 1981, in the basement boat shop, getting her beauty treatments:



    Happy trails!
    you might consider a thread related to self rescue mods that wooden boat building skills could be utilized to accomplish.

    a forum member in excellent physical condition has found the SP impossible to self rescue (an issue with many designs) in stock, as manufactured condition.

  33. #418

    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Here is a design that combines low cost, simplicity of construction, and sailing/camp cruising ability with well proportioned good looks.

    Screenshot_20170727-133257.jpg

  34. #419
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    41,981

    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Quote Originally Posted by Woxbox View Post
    A Bolger boat designed for old coots who wanted to mess about the Florida backwaters was Old Shoe. This is a shorter Micro without the cabin.



    I have a friend with one. It fits the bill, with the possible exception of man-handling it on & off the beach, or the trailer.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  35. #420

    Default Re: Designs for old codgers

    Sorry the image is so small. I don't know what I did wrong. Here is the URL:

    http://www.selway-fisher.com/PCover20.htm

    Just scroll down to Swan 20. - John

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