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Thread: Southern Cross

  1. #106
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
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    10,463

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Amazing. Extreme conditions, coupled with serious exhaustion.

  2. #107
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hamilton New Zealand
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    3,576

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul G. View Post
    Certainly inability to anchor is a huge factor as the type of journey/boat/area demands it for a single hander. I presume the plan was to sit out bad weather or make a run for shelter at the first sign of it relying on previous experience in fresh breezes if caught out but no one is ready for 60-70 knots of wind in a Scamp. All good planning except the kelp was not anticipated and I would imagine that it was incredibly tough conditions for any boat or sailor so a lot of credit to Mr Rice. The fact remains though you are not going anywhere much except with it when its 30kts in a Scamp, beyond that it would be terrifying especially on a lee shore. There is no escaping the fact it is a short high wooded unballasted craft with a lot of unnecessary windage. As I mentioned in one discussion about SC, why the mizzen? In my view its not practical. Looks nice, but the lug as drawn by John a very sweet rig for those windy conditions, you simply don't need a mizzen.

    Futhermore, the extreme conditions are not unusual in that area, in fact its par for the course so perhaps you are correct, SC may have been too heavy to drag up a beach (like a sailing canoe) and too small to weather a blow. Maybe in that area its best to be one or the other?
    Just remember that a 2500 ton Navy Patrol boat, specifically designed and built for operation in that area, had to seek shelter and was several times that night unable to be steered because of the intensity of the winds. This was, by the Navys own description, a very unusual event, and one which sank another yacht further south. Howards tactics of staying close to shore, anchoring in the nooks and crannies where there might be shelter, worked out in the end. The boat was rolled but not wrecked, he was blown off the boat and away from it, he had sufficient gear in his ditch bag to survive the night and to signal by beacon then by flares, had food, a means of providing some insulation, a means of starting fire and extra clothing plus was wearing a very high tech drysuit designed for those conditions.
    Lucky? For sure, but to a large extent he made his own luck by being prepared.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Uki, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    22,794

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by john welsford View Post
    Just remember that a 2500 ton Navy Patrol boat, specifically designed and built for operation in that area, had to seek shelter and was several times that night unable to be steered because of the intensity of the winds. This was, by the Navys own description, a very unusual event, and one which sank another yacht further south. Howards tactics of staying close to shore, anchoring in the nooks and crannies where there might be shelter, worked out in the end. The boat was rolled but not wrecked, he was blown off the boat and away from it, he had sufficient gear in his ditch bag to survive the night and to signal by beacon then by flares, had food, a means of providing some insulation, a means of starting fire and extra clothing plus was wearing a very high tech drysuit designed for those conditions.
    Lucky? For sure, but to a large extent he made his own luck by being prepared.

    John Welsford
    Indeed.
    My take is that if you poke someone with a sharp stick they'll get annoyed, if you smile and shake their hand they will be your friends.

    John Welsford

  4. #109
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    60,877

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by WX View Post
    Indeed.
    +1 Well said John.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  5. #110
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sweden,Scilly Isles, Siberia
    Posts
    7,476

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by john welsford View Post
    Lucky? For sure, but to a large extent he made his own luck by being prepared.

    John Welsford
    This point cannot be emphasized enough.And for those who still do not "get it", the difference is Howard telling the story, and not being flown home in a body bag.

  6. #111
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hamilton New Zealand
    Posts
    3,576

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Cross post. Howard has posted on my Facebook page, pics and an update. Note please that the internet in Puerto Williams is very limited at times. You might like to check out his tale here.

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/JWDesigns/

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  7. #112
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BC Coast
    Posts
    3,343

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by john welsford View Post
    Just remember that a 2500 ton Navy Patrol boat, specifically designed and built for operation in that area, had to seek shelter and was several times that night unable to be steered because of the intensity of the winds. This was, by the Navys own description, a very unusual event, and one which sank another yacht further south. Howards tactics of staying close to shore, anchoring in the nooks and crannies where there might be shelter, worked out in the end. The boat was rolled but not wrecked, he was blown off the boat and away from it, he had sufficient gear in his ditch bag to survive the night and to signal by beacon then by flares, had food, a means of providing some insulation, a means of starting fire and extra clothing plus was wearing a very high tech drysuit designed for those conditions.
    Lucky? For sure, but to a large extent he made his own luck by being prepared.

    John Welsford
    The Master of the Patrol vessel has as his first responsibility the safety of his own vessel and crew. He is entirely correct to seek shelter in those conditions rather than risk his ship and crew.

  8. #113
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hamilton New Zealand
    Posts
    3,576

    Default Re: Southern Cross

    Quote Originally Posted by gilberj View Post
    The Master of the Patrol vessel has as his first responsibility the safety of his own vessel and crew. He is entirely correct to seek shelter in those conditions rather than risk his ship and crew.
    Absolutely correct. But Howard has since had several meetings, as friends, with the commander of the Sibbald and her crew. He tells me that they were up all night agonising about the fact that they couldn't get to him. They'd fully expected to find a body next morning and were both beyond amazed and hugely relieved to see the flare that Howard set off as they came into view.

    The Navy personnel in Puerto Williams have been to see the little boat, sitting on her shipping cradle on the dock at the ferry terminal where she will be loaded in a few hours, they're amazed and very complimentary at how well the boat was equipped, how much thought had gone into her and how well she'd coped to get so far in what has been an exceptionally poor summer.

    Am I proud? You bet I am.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

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