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Thread: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

  1. #771
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    If you search there was a fairly recent thread on bending bronze, Some bronzes are very short , others are malleable .Silicone bronze is easy to bend and cold work.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  2. #772
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    interesting, I once tried to heat and bend a bronze rod for a rudder post and as it got soft it began to crumble into chunks as I tried to bend it...
    That would be the finnickey bit on hot working bronze, too hot and it tends to cruble and cold and you risk cracking.

    "...655 or silicon bronze and naval brass are readily forgable with a working range between 850 and 1150 degrees F..."
    - https://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/39055-forging-bronze/

    One of the problems with this working range is that all of it falls below the visible "glow" temoerature range, so if the metal you intend to work is glowing, it will likely crumble if you work it. So the recommended methods I have heard are to have a laser thermometer on it as you work to stay in the safe zone. Now all of this said, again, I have nto actually worked any bronze this way so my guess is it generally ammounts to something that can be done but is far more difficult to do well.

  3. #773
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Latest from the Arabella boys... (boys to this 71yo )


  4. #774
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Steve, Alix.
    I just started watching the latest installment, but had to hit pause, to encourage you to get anchorseal on the freshly cut deadwood blanks, lest those continue checking like the main log. I have a love/less-love relationship with white oak, and anchorseal has been effective at soothing said relationship.

  5. #775
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Agreed on the Anchorseal. A five gallon pail would be a most worthy and useful addition to your goops and goos locker.

    As far as the worm shoe goes...I've done them using roofing tar as a sealant, with roofing felt as a gasket, tar both wood surfaces and sandwich the felt between. The tar stays soft for years, it's cheap too!

  6. #776
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Agreed on the Anchorseal. A five gallon pail would be a most worthy and useful addition to your goops and goos locker.

    As far as the worm shoe goes...I've done them using roofing tar as a sealant, with roofing felt as a gasket, tar both wood surfaces and sandwich the felt between. The tar stays soft for years, it's cheap too!
    But don't forget a sheet of lead or copper between the worm shoe and the keel.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  7. #777
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    You guys are doing a great job of explaining what you are are doing and why you are doing it. I can’t wait to see the rate of progress when the weather finally decides to cooperate.

  8. #778
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    But don't forget a sheet of lead or copper between the worm shoe and the keel.
    Peter- The worm shoe will be on the bottom of the deadwood. So do you mean copper or lead between the worm shoe and the rest of the deadwood or between the deadwood and the keel or both? I have not heard of doing this before but I don't see how it could hurt.

    I ordered 2 gallons of Anchorseal. I have heard musings of the stuff before but wrongly assumed it was just a way to sell more paint. I have used tar/any old paint/ and linseed/kerosene mix to seal the ends of logs/boards with marginal results. Very interested to try the anchorseal especially with those huge oak logs in the wood yard!


    Here is the plan of attack as the weather warms, very open to any feedback or suggestions!

    -Thickness and paint the keel timber (top has been flattened and has thankfully stayed that way so far)
    - Make the final cuts for width on the keel timber but will leave it long for now.
    -Mark the rabbet line on the keel timber
    -Flatten the lead keel where we topped up the divots
    -Use fairing compound to smooth any of the remaining small imperfections on the lead keel
    - Paint the top, sides and nib ends of the lead keel with epoxy paint.

    Then we need to roll the ballast keel so I can smooth and paint the bottom so the hope is to flip it onto the wooden keel so fitting/shaping the deadwood is easier. Once it's fit, shaped and painted we will take the deadwood off, flip the lead keel over, put the wood keel on top and slide the deadwood into place. Since we have to roll the ballast anyways it seems easier to fit and shape from the rabbet down with the keel assembly upside down. While it is upside down I am going to drill for the keel bolts that pass through the nib ends and deadwood but plan to wait for the rest of them.

    Atkin calls for 7, 1-1/4" silicon bronze through bolts for the keel timber, I really like how Pardey did his, that makes a lot of sense to me. So I am thinking of dropping the bolts from 1-1/4" to 1" and use 10 instead of 7. 2 through bolted through the keel, deadwood and nib ends of the ballast keel. Then 8 more equally spread out down the keel drilled through bronze floors. I want to add bronze floors every other frame or so and would love the keel bolts to hold those frames to the keel assembly. Once we start adding floors it will be easy to drill down though the holes in the bronze floors and down into the ballast keel like Pardey did.
    Is there any reason not to do it this way?

    For the faying surfaces my plan is to give them a couple coats of Copper Green wood preservative, a couple coats of Pettit UnEpoxy hard bottom paint and then bed the pieces with dolphinite. I have heard of using tar and felt paper, would that be better or similar to the bottom paint and dolphinite? I have two quarts of dolphinite right now, it seems like it should be enough to bed the ballast keel at least. Might have to get more for the deadwood and worm shoes but that's fine.

    Once the keels and deadwood are all joined I can start to put on the bow and stern timbers and bolting it all together. I think cutting the rabbet will be done when it is all stood up before the molds go up. I can't fathom rolling the frame like Bud and Pardey do, it's all just way too heavy and I don't think we could keep the stem and stern from wracking.

    Headed to Jamestown Distributors this Saturday (April 14th) for their tent sale, so if you are in the area please stop by and say hi! We also have our open house on May 5th, hope to see some of you there as well!

    Last but not least

    We bought a truck and found an arborist on Cape Cod with access to tons of locust. He is collecting logs for us and sometime later this month we will borrow a trailer and go collect them. The logs are free, he has machines to load them, we just have to go collect. We are super psyched!

    Steven Bauer:
    I am optimistic we will have your rub and toe rails for you, sometime after mid May you will have to take a trip here with the truck. The guy on the Cape just cut a nice straight 22' trunk that I think might contain what you need =)

    As always thanks for the suggestions, guidance and encouragement!!!!
    ACORN TO ARABELLA
    For additional info on this project:

    www.acorntoarabella.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAi...WB1xCp6uuUo0VA

  9. #779
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Tar is essentially dolphinite, except it doesn't leech oils into the wood and dry out, and its much cheaper! I feel it insulates more electrically as well, but I don't have real info to back that up.

    So for me, its dolphinite between wooden timbers, and roofing tar in the ballast keel joint.

    Adding tar paper on the lead is another good isolator and protector against worms and electrolysis.

  10. #780
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Tar and Dolphinite are not essentially the same. Dolphinite will dry out and become brittle junk eventually if used on unsealed wood. I've never seen roofing cement (tar) dry out. Dolphinite is the stuff to use above the waterline. Don't even think of using roof cement above the waterline, you won't believe how it can bleed. I'd suggest you follow Jim's advice of tar and roofing felt (tar paper) between the bottom of the keel/deadwood and the worm shoe. The copper or lead sheet is not necessary, tar paper has been working fine for me for the last 40 years.


    I think your last video you asked for locust trees. I hope you can find the size trees you're looking for but I've never found a locust that was big dia., straight, and solid. It's incredibly dense rot resistant lumber but the trees are very susceptible to ant damage and rarely get very large before developing problems. Don't turn down some less than perfect looking logs, you can get lots of usable lumber just rarely in very large sizes.

  11. #781
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Take every last bit you can get but you knew that would be my advice. As for long straight lengths, North America seems to be bad for them, ants, locust beetles etc. I They are cultivated in Europe though and they select for long straight growth. If you hack out the scrubby brush stuff, you're never going to find the good stuff but if you grow it and tend it as a timber crop for large saw logs, you'll get plenty of it since it grows so quickly. I saw a paper on it a few months ago, may be from WBF but I'm not sure.
    I just spent an hour at my lathe turning a carving mallet from a log I have. It makes awesome tool handles so if you need to replace a chisel or axe handle, you can make a great handle out of smaller bits.
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

  12. #782
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    We got the truck purchased and registered so we can now head out to the Cape and gather our locust logs.
    The guy out there has managed to find a few decent logs for us, one was 22' and decently straight. Hoping to be able to get a few good ones from him by the time we mill in May. They cut one a couple months back that was 48" at the base! Hopefully they come across another one like that! Too bad we did not ask sooner or that one might have landed on the mill. Gonna see about making the trek out for the first load on Thursday.

    Last week I took the keel timber down to it's final thickness, slowly making progress on this cold wet spring.

    The weather is being uncooperative to say the least, still too cold and humid to have paint cure so we moved onto the stem assembly. I hand jointed one face then ran them through the thickness planer and brought them down to 1/8" over sized. Will take the last 1/16" off each side after assembly.

    The glue joints look solid and tight once planed and cleaned up, very happy with how they turned out!

    This week looks like crummy weather but the forecast for next week looks good, fingers crossed!

    ACORN TO ARABELLA
    For additional info on this project:

    www.acorntoarabella.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAi...WB1xCp6uuUo0VA

  13. #783
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    My, that is some beautiful wood!

  14. #784
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Have you tried painting? the cold can affect the speed of paint drying but seems to have much more affect on oil like Lynseed or toung than on typical oil paints, I've painted in colder, it helps if we warm the can on a heater before applying...

    as long as the wood your painting is not damp the moisture in our spring air should not be a concern as your likely using oil paint (not latex) so the evaporation occurring is petroleum of turpentine based volatiles... not water, which is what the air is heavy with.


    dead wood looking good!

  15. #785
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    We are blessed with nice oak, that is for sure!

    I have put 3 coats of Total Boat's Danish Teak Sealer on the keel timber, it is oil based and dried slowly but seems to have cured well.
    I have not tried to actually paint, the Pettit UnEpoxy for the keel timber says it should be at least 45*F to apply and the epoxy paint for the ballast keel says 55*F minimum with 60* being preferable. It just does not seem prudent to try to push it, it would suck to have the paint cure badly. Next week is looking warmer so we will at least be able to paint the keel timber.

    A new found friend dropped off his 16" Makita beam saw for us to use! Soon (today/tomorrow) we will bring the keel timber down to final size and start cutting the bow and stern timbers to shape.

    Before we can do that I have to head to the auction to see if I can get us a pig for the pig roast on May 5th.
    Everyone and anyone is welcome to come for the open house/pig roast/ birthday bash! 12-7pm, we will provide the grub, BYOB.
    291 Batchelor Steet, Granby Ma, 01033
    ACORN TO ARABELLA
    For additional info on this project:

    www.acorntoarabella.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAi...WB1xCp6uuUo0VA

  16. #786
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    If you wait for painting weather to get a move on you're going to have a really small window of opportunity to actually build the boat, May through October. You need a small heated space where you can bring pieces in to warm up for gluing and paint. I'm surprised you don't have a good wood stove set up in your shed, it makes all the difference between a pleasant working day and a grueling marathon. I like to make assemblies first and then break them down for paint and goop when all the surfaces are finished up, pour the poison into all the bored holes and so on.

    Clamp that big keel timber onto the lead and set it up, dammit!

  17. #787
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    If you wait for painting weather to get a move on you're going to have a really small window of opportunity to actually build the boat, May through October. You need a small heated space where you can bring pieces in to warm up for gluing and paint. I'm surprised you don't have a good wood stove set up in your shed, it makes all the difference between a pleasant working day and a grueling marathon. I like to make assemblies first and then break them down for paint and goop when all the surfaces are finished up, pour the poison into all the bored holes and so on.

    Clamp that big keel timber onto the lead and set it up, dammit!

    I completely agree!

    The boathouse is gigantic and far to big to try to heat but my small wood shop in the back of the garage has a wood stove and since we are bachelors and there is no one to object we can always glue/ paint inside the house.

    Problem is the damn keel timber, ballast keel and deadwood assemblies are huge and heavy, we can't easily move them into and out of the shop/house. It seems to make more sense to just be patient and await the warmth. Next week is looking good, hopefully it pans out. If not maybe the week after. Soon it will be plenty hot to paint!

    This winter has been a bear but subsequent winters should not be so bad, the parts get smaller and the more hull we have the more I will feel comfortable jumping ahead and doing things like hatches, deadeyes, grab rails, casting work.... With some better planning we should be able to keep busy all winter.

    The keel is now cut to size with the beam saw, gotta tip it on it's side and adze off the last couple inches the saw could not reach. Before that though I have to figure out the electrical, it stopped working today in the garage and boathouse and I can't figure out why. Gonna be harder to build the boat with no power in the boathouse! Got to get this issue sorted ASAP

    All set to drive to the Cape on Thursday to get some locust, 6 hours round trip but it should be worth it. He has a pretty straight 22' log for me, said it weighs around 6k pounds and to bring a big chainsaw. Sounds promising =)
    ACORN TO ARABELLA
    For additional info on this project:

    www.acorntoarabella.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAi...WB1xCp6uuUo0VA

  18. #788
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Prior to the advent of the restricitions on volital emissions and toxic paint pigments, red lead was normally used for priming keel and other underwater joint faces. A viable substitute is shellac. It dries fast and Dolfinite is very compatible with it as a bedding compound.
    Jay

  19. #789
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Jay- Thanks for the tip! I think I am going to use Pettit UnEpoxy (hard antifouling paint) in replacement of the red lead primer but it's good to know shellac and dolfinite get along.

    Went and got some locust today. They are pretty gnarly but we should be able to tease some ok to maybe awesome lumber from them. Kinda hard to tell what exactly is in there.

    The gentleman I got them from is going to rustle up another load for us of straighter and clearer logs, alibi significantly smaller. Hopefully between a bunch of straight skinny ones and these two gnarly monsters we can get enough to accomplish what I would like to accomplish with it.
    ACORN TO ARABELLA
    For additional info on this project:

    www.acorntoarabella.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAi...WB1xCp6uuUo0VA

  20. #790
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    That's a lotta cleats!

  21. #791
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Quote Originally Posted by sdenette View Post
    I completely agree!

    The boathouse is gigantic and far to big to try to heat but my small wood shop in the back of the garage has a wood stove and since we are bachelors and there is no one to object we can always glue/ paint inside the house.

    Problem is the damn keel timber, ballast keel and deadwood assemblies are huge and heavy, we can't easily move them into and out of the shop/house. It seems to make more sense to just be patient and await the warmth. Next week is looking good, hopefully it pans out. If not maybe the week after. Soon it will be plenty hot to paint!
    You guys are quite clever so I'm assuming you've already considered this.. but if not.. what about just tenting the timber itself? A tent within the tent.. I'm assuming that you are just wanting to coat the bottom of the timber before mating to the lead? Just a thought.
    Last edited by BrianM; 04-19-2018 at 03:49 PM.

  22. #792
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    That is a good load of locust! It is always gnarly, but that doesn't mean its not perfect for many parts. While there will be some good long stock that may work for deck beams (mill the logs to the sweep) it will be even more useful for small, highly loaded parts. Its perfect for floor timbers, mast partners and steps, breasthooks, cleats, chocks, sampson posts, knees, blocks, etc...

    Its a very good find.

    BTW, I'm not sure bottom paint seals wood well enough to work long term with Dolphinite. Why not a coat of shellac, and then put the unipoxy over? It will only cost you 20 mins for the shellac to dry, and you'll know its good.

  23. #793
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianM View Post
    You guys are quite clever so I'm assuming you've already considered this.. but it not.. what about just tenting the timber itself? A tent within the tent.. I'm assuming that you are just wanting to coat the bottom of the timber before mating to the lead? Just a thought.

    Thanks =)
    Yeah we thought of that. Our concern is with the lead keel paint, the timber paint just has to be 45*F which we have had several days of. The lead keel paint and fairing compound is epoxy based so the air AND the lead need to be 60*F for the epoxy to cure properly. Getting all 4.5 tons of lead up to 60*F when it's 30*F at night and 45/50*F during the day will take time and/or a lot of heat. It just seems to risky, once it's warmer we will probably tent it to hold the heat better at night and help get the lead up to temp but we need a few warm days in a row for that to work.
    Since we are on hold with the lead keel there is no rush on the wood one, we just keep picking at it. Some adze work and some paint and the keel timber is finished other than being trimmed to final length which will come much later on.
    We are plugging away at what we can, the whole next week is supposed to be much warmer, plenty warm to paint the keel timber and bow/stern assemblies and maybe the lead keel.
    I really wish we could just carry the ballast keel inside the house but I bet even if we could the floors would not support it haha!


    Jim-
    There certainly is a cleat or two in there! Hoping for deadeyes, samson post and some hatch framing. The next load will be smaller diameter but straighter and more clear so hoping to get the toe/rub rails from that load. And of course cleats from whatever offcuts/hunks we have left over. There is at least 6,000 pounds of locust between the two logs, gotta be some good wood in there somewhere!
    ACORN TO ARABELLA
    For additional info on this project:

    www.acorntoarabella.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAi...WB1xCp6uuUo0VA

  24. #794
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    That is a good load of locust! It is always gnarly, but that doesn't mean its not perfect for many parts. While there will be some good long stock that may work for deck beams (mill the logs to the sweep) it will be even more useful for small, highly loaded parts. Its perfect for floor timbers, mast partners and steps, breasthooks, cleats, chocks, sampson posts, knees, blocks, etc...

    Its a very good find.

    BTW, I'm not sure bottom paint seals wood well enough to work long term with Dolphinite. Why not a coat of shellac, and then put the unipoxy over? It will only cost you 20 mins for the shellac to dry, and you'll know its good.

    As always a wealth of knowledge! Can't see how the shellac could hurt, any recommendations on types/brands?

    We will for sure mill to the sweep and we will see what we get out of them, even the odd small bits could be useful, cleats, mast hounds, blocks... are not large items! =)

    In any even we have a ton of beautiful White Oak so even if a lot of the locust is junk we will just have to "resort" to oak =)
    ACORN TO ARABELLA
    For additional info on this project:

    www.acorntoarabella.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAi...WB1xCp6uuUo0VA

  25. #795
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Zinsser shellac is the only kind I’ve ever used other than buying shellac flakes and dissolving them in alcohol. The latter is more of a furniture thing. I would get the clear Zinsser shellac as opposed to the amber, the can of amber i’ve Been working through is much closer to orange flakes, which don’t do it for me colorwise. Buy a brush like a Liebco best stainer with the rectangular white china bristle. You can store the brush in alcohol and give it a spin before use and never need to clean it. It’ll last decades that way. Congrats on the Locust hook up, that stuff is rarer than pope sh!t.

  26. #796
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    OK, THOSE are some beautiful logs you've got there. Glad you were able to find it. As everyone here knows, I love the stuff. BL is my favourite wood and I hope I can find logs like that (and longer straighter bigger as well of course) when it comes time for me to need more BL. As mentioned, there' cleats, blocks and other small bits galore in there over and above any larger parts you might be lucky enough to get out of them. Congrats on the find guys.
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

  27. #797
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Quote Originally Posted by John Husky View Post
    Zinsser shellac is the only kind I’ve ever used other than buying shellac flakes and dissolving them in alcohol. The latter is more of a furniture thing. I would get the clear Zinsser shellac as opposed to the amber, the can of amber i’ve Been working through is much closer to orange flakes, which don’t do it for me colorwise. Buy a brush like a Liebco best stainer with the rectangular white china bristle. You can store the brush in alcohol and give it a spin before use and never need to clean it. It’ll last decades that way. Congrats on the Locust hook up, that stuff is rarer than pope sh!t.

    Sweet, thanks for the tips! Sounds like it might be worth getting some to go wherever we will put dolfinite which is a lot of places! Good to know the alcohol will clean the brush up.


    It is some decent locust, the guy counted the rings and said right around 100 years. Hoping to get the short and thick/wide stuff from these logs and the longer skinny stuff from the next load.

    Cape Cod on Massachusetts is COVERED in Locust! If you are within striking distance from there I would call arborist/landscaping companies and ask around. Sounds like most/all of it gets bucked up for firewood, a few guys out there buy it for $150 a ton or so and sell it for firewood, not much of a market. It's also coastal so most if not all people are on the water and in boats, I bet many or most would rather see the locust go into a vessel than up a chimney.
    It's a 6 hour round trip for us but those logs cost us only $100 in fuel and tolls. Not too shabby for 3 tons of locust!
    ACORN TO ARABELLA
    For additional info on this project:

    www.acorntoarabella.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAi...WB1xCp6uuUo0VA

  28. #798
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    That's peanuts for price. I might even make a trek. Need to de-bark it to get it across the border though. May need to paint it as well, not sure but that's easy to do.
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

  29. #799
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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Page 2? Time to step it up boys. Jim was right, get that keel bolted together.
    I just perused WB issue 262 and Dr. Jagel's Wood Technology article this issue was about Black Locust. Have a look. Now I need to know what kind of BL I got for my Catspaw already.
    Cheers,
    Daniel
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

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    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Quote Originally Posted by sdenette View Post
    Steven Bauer:
    I am optimistic we will have your rub and toe rails for you, sometime after mid May you will have to take a trip here with the truck. The guy on the Cape just cut a nice straight 22' trunk that I think might contain what you need =)
    Sounds great. If we don the make it down for the party we’ll be in the area the following two weekends for my nephew’s graduation and my daughter’s graduation. We’ve also got Mary’s mom’s 90th birthday party in there, too. Busy month for us.

  31. #801
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Granby, Massachusetts
    Posts
    303

    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Quote Originally Posted by Sailor View Post
    Page 2? Time to step it up boys. Jim was right, get that keel bolted together.
    I just perused WB issue 262 and Dr. Jagel's Wood Technology article this issue was about Black Locust. Have a look. Now I need to know what kind of BL I got for my Catspaw already.
    Cheers,
    Daniel

    If you and/or Jim would like to come lend a newbie a hand to expedite the process I surly won't turn you away!!

    My copy has not arrived yet, looking forward to checking it out!


    Now that it has warmed up I am making some headway.

    Starboard side is done, just needs to be trimmed to length (will happen much later). The port side is cut with the beam saw and just needs the last 4" removed to match the starboard side.

    Used the power planer to flatten where we topped up the ballast keel divots then it got a good cleaning and fairing compound put on.

    Tomorrow the top 1/2 of the ballast keel will get a sand and it's first coat of paint. The keel timber will get flipped and I will get cranking on the port side. Soon they can go together and I can fair/paint the bottom of the ballast keel and start the deadwood.

    ACORN TO ARABELLA
    For additional info on this project:

    www.acorntoarabella.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAi...WB1xCp6uuUo0VA

  32. #802
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    176

    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Quote Originally Posted by Sailor View Post
    That's peanuts for price. I might even make a trek. Need to de-bark it to get it across the border though. May need to paint it as well, not sure but that's easy to do.
    Just no bark. We've brought unstamped lumber across the boarder.

  33. #803
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Shubenacadie NS
    Posts
    4,276

    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Just no bark. OK , I can deal with that. I brought a few small sticks to Andrew's place a couple of years ago to turn belaying pins out of and I painted them thinking they needed some sort of finish on them. I dipped them in BLO on the way back. Good to know I can skip that step.
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
    -Henry David Thoreau-

  34. #804
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Granby, Massachusetts
    Posts
    303

    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Got the ballast keel and the fairing compound smoothed, used the power planer to knock off the bigger/higher spots and then a file and sand paper to finish up.
    It also finally warmed up enough to paint so we got the first two coats of epoxy primer on the ballast keel.
    It looks so much better with a coat of paint!

    Today in the rain I am going to finish the port side of the keel timber, tomorrow that can get painted and then we have to flip the ballast keel onto the wood keel so I can fair/paint the bottom of the lead keel and it will also make fitting the deadwood so much easier.

    Sealed the deal for the sawmill, it should be arriving in a couple weeks. The chap on the Cape texted and said since he put the word out he was looking for locust he has gotten a bunch of calls from arborists and landscapers. He is going to collect a bunch at his yard for us and we can just drive out and take what we want! Should be able to get another load or two, maybe even 3 before we sawmill.

    It feels so damn good to be making progress again!

    ACORN TO ARABELLA
    For additional info on this project:

    www.acorntoarabella.com
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAi...WB1xCp6uuUo0VA

  35. #805
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    8,636

    Default Re: Building Arabella (An Atkin Ingrid)

    Spring has Srung... the Arabella Boys are back at it!

    when do you gents plan to get started on the tender?... Im' thinking an "Acorn" skiff might be ideal!

    Last edited by Daniel Noyes; 04-25-2018 at 11:53 AM.

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