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Thread: Storer Sailing Canoe

  1. #1
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    Default Storer Sailing Canoe


  2. #2
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Sailing Beth is more adventuresome and athletic than I can picture. Looks like a hoot, though!!
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Struggling with posting today. This is the prototype Michael Storer sailing canoe. Her mainden sail was this week. She is 14' by 40" beam which makes her wider and more stable than the narrower sailing canoe. Will attempt to post more pics.

    She floats beautifully on her side


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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Great paddling with kids aboard


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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe





    The rig is Michael's Really Simple Sails including the spars.

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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Very clean simple cockpit with comfy sidedecks


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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Hull shape


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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Looks like enough stabiltyy to stand up when sailing'!



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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Ahhh... I didn't even look. That's not Beth. Thanks for sharing!!
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    It's sort of a big duck punt, eh? Really nice looking boat.

    I really like the little hiking benchlets that look like they may be flotation, too.

    Really, really cool looking boat!

    Peace,
    Robert

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Interesting boat,probably even comparatively stable-but then I did sail a Moth that was a lot narrower on the waterline-a long time ago.Looks like a clean and uncluttered interior and only missing a self bailer.

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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    Ahhh... I didn't even look. That's not Beth. Thanks for sharing!!
    No, Beth was a flat-bottomed girl.

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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Are there plans available yet for this really interesting craft ? Looks like another cracker from MIK.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    It's sort of a big duck punt, eh? Really nice looking boat.

    I really like the little hiking benchlets that look like they may be flotation, too.

    Really, really cool looking boat!

    Peace,
    Robert

    Very nice indeed !
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    So if she's not Beth, what is she ?
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Nice little boat. Love the combo side deck/flotation chamber.

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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Really nice work, both the designer and the builder should give themselves a pat on the back.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    It's sort of a big duck punt, eh? Really nice looking boat.
    --- Much wider and more weatherly than a Duckpunt. It would be be sailed very differently. -- Wade

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Now that is interesting! I remember seeing some sailing "canoes" in a Woodeb Boat artle some years ago, beam 42-44 inches or something, on the border of being a dinghy. I like these dimensions. Reminds me a little of some/one of the Solway Dory sailing canoes? -- Wade

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Shooting from the cuff here - and please take this as an alternate point of view - not a criticism! - 'cos I reckon this boat would be a blast - just the thing to get the old juices surging again! ;-)

    - oh, and I have campaigned the Uffa Fox sliding seat canoe - an even more extreme beast ,,,,

    Its the choice of flotation scheme that worries me. I am in the "end tank" school for preference. (as in the Solway Dory). The photo shows how high the boat floats on its side - I would be pretty diligent in not relinquishing my death-grip on the mainsheet in a capsize .... (having had a few desperate swims after a receding boat).

    Now, I can appreciate the elegance of utilising the side tanks as torsion boxes for strength - and I love that such a long and capable boat would be so light (I could imagine someone doing the Texas 200, or a Watertribe event), however those tanks still cause the boat to float dangerously high in my estimation.{An expedition load might weigh the boat down enough to get enough grip to slow the drift?}

    I assume a sealed carbon mast - so little chance of allowing turtling. (if the boat is very light, and with good mast and rigging, turtling may not be so bad - at least the boat will be "parked"). Thus, if the boat escapes (and such light, high performance craft seem perversely determined to do this ....) then you had better be wearing the means of calling for rescue - and the gear to survive until it comes.

    I see there is little more flotation in each tank than floats the boat - so pulling down on the centreboard should easily right it - and allow a reasonable amount of water in the bilge (good! - in my experience). Bailers will quickly empty it.

    Also I think that lateral stability in a swamped boat is not a problem in practice. I may revise this if I find that declining agility requires more side buoyancy - however I have found that flotation arranged athwartships, rather than using side tanks, generally gives sufficient stability.

    But, particularly if the bow is not supported, it is crazy-hard to cope when the swamped boat does not have much longitudinal stability.

    I do not have any concern about a lot of water aboard after a capsize. I reckon that any boat that comes up with a bellyful of water is likely free of other vices that impede self recovery - being easier to reboard, more docile generally - and whilst a heavily swamped boat is less likely to charge into the rocks, or under a wharf, it can still be sailed reliably - if slowly - on any course (dead downwind may be a bit iffy!)

    Well! I didn't mean to write a treatise ....

    forgive me,

    old frank

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    OK, lets clarify.

    She is a brand new design from Michael Storer.

    She is called Viola. After the partner of the first builder Joost.

    She is 14' x 40".

    Her rig is 5m. Designed by Michael and supplied by Michael through Really Siimply Sails. Spars alloy standard tubes.


    Now, it is one thing for Joost to be pleased how she sailed, but someone else also loved how she sailed.

    Joost's partner took her out. She loved her, described her as "a hoot" to sail. This is terrific. Sailing canoes terrify just about every one who has not sailed one.

    This could really be a break though. A non scary sailing canoe. Wow.

    Brian

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Nifty sailing canoe.

    The hull concept bears some resemblance to Bolger's Payson Pirogue: http://www.woodworkforums.com/f169/p...ylvania-123731


  23. #23
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by keyhavenpotterer View Post
    OK, lets clarify.

    She is a brand new design from Michael Storer.

    She is called Viola. After the partner of the first builder Joost.

    She is 14' x 40".

    Her rig is 5m. Designed by Michael and supplied by Michael through Really Siimply Sails. Spars alloy standard tubes.


    Now, it is one thing for Joost to be pleased how she sailed, but someone else also loved how she sailed.

    Joost's partner took her out. She loved her, described her as "a hoot" to sail. This is terrific. Sailing canoes terrify just about every one who has not sailed one.

    This could really be a break though. A non scary sailing canoe. Wow.

    Brian
    Thinking of one Brian ?
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Can only think and dream Peter for now.

    MIK has to release plans etc. Might be attempting to simplfy plans to an IKEA style if possible so plans release wouldn't hold everything up.

    Brian

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    I like it ! A good river boat here.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Joost has managed to create a login so will be postng here soon.

    His previous build was a Goat Island Skiff.

    Even entered the Scottish Raid!



    http://www.storerboatplans.com/wp/bo...aledonia-raid/

    Viola, his partner, crewed, but has not been a confident helm, hence the delight at how much she enjoyed the new sailing canoe.

    Brian

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Joost has just bought some scales to weigh the boat.

    34.3 kgs

    76.6 lbs

    That includes all fittings screwed to the hull, toe straps, rudder fittings, epoxy coating hull and paint.

    Brian

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Let me, Joost, the builder of the prototype Viola 14 canoe (as she isofficially called), provide some background information on the boat.

    The Viola 14 design is the result from my discussions with Michael Storer about a simple very lightweight sailboat having good performance potential that could easily be taken out for a couple of hoursor so for simply messing about. A boat that could be used like a lot of people sail their Lasers and Sunfishes but that, if possible, would allow for a bit more: going for a paddle with the family for example or participating in raids on protected waters. I also mentioned that I really liked the concept and size of the Aquamuse canoe, but was looking for something that could be home built and that would be (even) more exiting to sail. Michael accepted the challenge and came back within a couple of days showing his ideas for such boat. The photos above show the final result. The boat is a light sailing boat of a dinghy shape but having a canoe’s stern (so aimed at sailing rather than paddling).

    The build is a straightforward 5 hull panels stitch and glue one. All plywood parts are cut from 4 sheets of 4mm ocoume plywood (this should be used to keepthe weight down!). Glass tape inside and out and 160 grams glass cloth on the outside of the bottom and bilge panels going up appr. 5 cm past the chines. Two bottom runners further stiffen up the bottom. The dagger board case’s shape allows the dagger board to the tilted back allowing the boat to be balanced under a number of rigs. Boat weight including all hull fittings (hiking straps and rudder fittings), fully epoxy coated,glassed and faired and painted inside and out is 34.3 kg!

    I have only sailed the boat once, but am impressed so far. This is a sit-on-top type of canoe rather than a sit-in type of canoe and thus side decks are needed (hiking straps are fitted for proper hiking). It only makes sense to make the side decks into buoyancy tanks. The volume is chosen so that it does not float too high in the water. I put her on her side twice in waist deep water and she does not invert at all with the watertight topmast made from a standard aluminium section. Having forward and aft tanks would let her sink a bit further, but I am not sure whether this would make much of a difference in respect from the boat being blown away from you (she would perhaps sink 5 inches deeper. People wishing to box the ends in can easily doat a weight penalty. After righting the boat, there was appr. 5 cm of waterleft in her, which is centered in the middle of the boat due to the side buoyancy tanks. A self-bailer is easily fitted if wanted.

    Much time was spent thinking about the rig. Something exiting and different was wanted from what has been done so far onsailing canoes (aside from IC10 canoes). On an expedition type of canoe (like the Solwaydory canoes) the non-battened bermudan rigs often make a lot of sensesince they allow one to reef very quickly. For sail and oar type of events (especially here in the Netherlands where one is dealing with loads of low bridges) a good choice would be a balanced lug rig since it allows one to dump the sail very quickly with shorter spars to handle. I believe that Michael is working on this rig option for the boat.

    The modern laminate sail will however have more performance and I think it really fits the boat well presenting something new and exiting. The sail area is still quite modest (a canoe does not need that much sail area) and the rig controls are simple and easily reached from the steering position. I feel that there is no real need to lead these back to the side decks. Foil blanks were laminated from Western Red Ceder with hardwood edges after which they were shaped per the template provided by Michael andglassed on both sides.

    More testing to be done next weekend! I ama very happy builder/owner.
    Last edited by Joost Engelen; 08-28-2016 at 11:16 AM. Reason: Added spacer lines for readibility

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Joost - congrats on the new build. Will be looking forward to hearing more as you log some hours in her. She looks brilliant. Thanks for showing her off here!
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Love the rig. - How much £ for the sail?
    Someday, I'm going to settle down and be a grumpy old man.

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by wtarzia View Post
    --- Much wider and more weatherly than a Duckpunt. It would be be sailed very differently. -- Wade
    Ah, yes. Hence, SORT of a BIG duck punt. As in, a bigger version of a boat similar to a duck punt.
    Peace,
    Robert

  32. #32
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by P.I. Stazzer-Newt View Post
    Love the rig. - How much £ for the sail?
    Could you please contact the supplier of the sail (Really Simple Sails) directly for this (I don't want to violate forum rules)?

    Let's keep the discussion here on the design itself.

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Ah, yes. Hence, SORT of a BIG duck punt. As in, a bigger version of a boat similar to a duck punt.
    ...
    --- I think the addition of beam, side-seats, rudder, and centerboard takes the boat pretty far out of the Duckpunt category. Duckpunts seem to be sailed by sitting or laying down in the hull, in extremely shallow water, with an oar to steer. Going to weather in deeper water and using your body weight differently is the key here. Nothing against duckpunts! They are unsurpassed for what they were designed to do! -- Wade

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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    So glad to see you here Joost.

    Brian

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    Default Re: Storer Sailing Canoe

    Quote Originally Posted by wtarzia View Post
    --- I think the addition of beam, side-seats, rudder, and centerboard takes the boat pretty far out of the Duckpunt category. Duckpunts seem to be sailed by sitting or laying down in the hull, in extremely shallow water, with an oar to steer. Going to weather in deeper water and using your body weight differently is the key here. Nothing against duckpunts! They are unsurpassed for what they were designed to do! -- Wade
    Agreed. I apologize. It looks nothing whatever like a duck punt. I am sorry to have made the comparison, and I withdraw all comments, except I think the boat is pretty.

    Peace,
    Robert

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