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Thread: Lapstrake designs

  1. #71
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    North Bend, OR. USA
    Posts
    123

    Default Re: Lapstrake designs

    Just a thought from my own personal search for boat plans. I have wanted to build a boat for 30+ years. My favorite had always been the Catspaw dinghy. I love the shape, and it is just a pretty boat to me. But I decided to keep looking, if only to be sure. I also am trying to be realistic about how much time I have to actually build a boat, and not overextend myself. (I have said I would like to finish before I am 103!). So at this point construction design became a factor. I started to look at the designs that might be available in kits. (In my mind a bit of a misnomer, since the word kit hints at all of the parts of a model car, just needs to be glued together!)Nothing could be further from the truth, at least from where I sit now. Kits include forms and planks only, with plenty of real woodworking to do to complete the job. Stem, keel, transom, rudder, spars, all have to be formed and beveled to accept the planks. All of this appeals to the woodworker in me, without the amount of time it would take to learn and complete lofting, etc. So I have settled(at least at this point!)on the Tammie Norrie. I hope to build at the beginning of the year, giving me a bit of time to sell a kidney/rob a bank, etc. Actually it's not that bad...plans about $250, kit around $1600. Mostly I just love her lines, the shape of her transom, and the fact that it is a design that I think I can build. Glued lapstrake gives me the shape and lines that I like, in a design looks to be doable to me. That's my two cents!

  2. #72
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Valnesfjord, Norway
    Posts
    764

    Default Re: Lapstrake designs

    Quote Originally Posted by OldDominionWB View Post
    I see where people are coming from with long boats vs. short boats, but I don't think longer boats are *necessarily* easier to plank than short boats. In my opinion, it's the turn of the bilge, and the change in deadrise from midships to the bow, that really makes the difference. Basically, it's how much twist is required in a plank. A 16' Whitehall will be tougher to plank than a 12' dory because the dory doesn't have much twist, and the Whitehall does. However, an 12' Whitehall will be more difficult to plank than a 16' Whitehall because it will require the same degree of twist in a shorter length of plank. I think this is where people are coming from when they say a longer boat is easier to plank than a shorter boat.

    I'd say you'll get the best answers about wood if you test out the different species you have on your property. Wood choice is a pretty personal thing. Everybody has different experiences, and we all feel very strongly about our opinions. Practice steam bending some pieces. Try the different species with screws, rivets, clinch nails- whatever fasteners you plan to use- and see how they hold. Local growing conditions have a lot to do with a wood's qualities, so I guarantee you that your experiences will differ somewhat from other people's experiences with the same species. Some people can't stand yellow pine, but there's some unfinished loblolly pine on my house that's lasted just over 100 years now. Presumably it's old growth. Back then, growing conditions were very different, the wood wasn't being farmed, and it's a completely different wood from the loblolly 2x4's we get at Home Depot. I'm not saying we can't give you advice, but I think in this case, all of our advice isn't nearly as valuable as a day or two of your own experience.

    Remember that ribs are easily replaceable, and anything can be fixed. Of course you should make the most informed decision that you can, but if you've got the sawing equipment, I'd say go with what you've got on your property. In general, I think you probably want something strong and probably reasonably hard. So pick the strongest stuff on your property. Most importantly, don't let the decision keep you from building the boat. Even if the ribs don't last, you'll have a lot of new knowledge when it comes time to replace them.
    I like the way you think! There is two reasons I want to saw it myself: The cost of bying material is one, but most important is that its a good feeling to be able to use local woods, and cut it myself.

    I wonder if Gartside 128 https://store.gartsideboats.com/coll...oop-design-218 or Gartside 124 https://store.gartsideboats.com/coll...ger-design-124 might be too big projects, but I really like both of them.

    I have plans for Gartside 166 https://store.gartsideboats.com/coll...ard-lugger-145 and this might be a project in a distant future too (Design for strip-plank, or lapstrake.)

  3. #73
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Valnesfjord, Norway
    Posts
    764

    Default Re: Lapstrake designs

    Lets say this is my dreaming thread so far, but these days I am cutting down som spruce threes for boatbuilding.

    It will be one more year before starting to build a lapstrake as I need to finish my Argie15 first. (and sail it)

    I am really jumping now between Gartside Design #218, and the crazy idea of trying to build Don Kyrulkos D18 Myst in real clinker-lapstrake.(yes I have discussed with him)

    I do like the yawl rig a lot, so thoughts on that compared the gaff sloop are velcome. I also consider Gartside 17 ft yawl design #191 But I must learn to like the transom...


    Fred

  4. #74
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    647

    Default Re: Lapstrake designs

    There are a lot of nice traditional designs in the book by Christian Nielson, Wooden Boat Designs; Classic Danish Boats. You would have to work from the line drawings and make your own offsets. However the author might have the offsets, You can contact him if there is a design you wanted to build.

  5. #75
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Valnesfjord, Norway
    Posts
    764

    Default

    This is the start of a lapstrake build. A lot of time to deside design 😁

    Sent fra min SM-N950F via Tapatalk

  6. #76
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Europe
    Posts
    8,740

    Default Re: Lapstrake designs

    I think the transom on the 17ft yawl is quite attractive.....as far as transoms can be.



    I believe this boat sold quite quick, easy to sell good looking boats that have been well built.

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