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Thread: Centennial

  1. #316
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Perhaps someone on the forum can provide details on the canvas work and the supports for the cabin tops on the Norfolk Broads cabin sailing boats that sail out of Hunters Yard. I spent time on the small HUSTLER class whose cabin top could lift up in a wedge like yours, or lift up completely. Seriously weather proof canvas and lifting arrangements; spent two days cabin bound in it in a major gale.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  2. #317
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    Default Re: Centennial


  3. #318
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    Default Re: Centennial

    for all those considering starting a short ship of their own...
    here's where we were at a year ago! Aug 15 2016.

    and a couple weeks ago!
    Last edited by Daniel Noyes; 08-19-2017 at 09:42 AM.

  4. #319
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Looking good there, Daniel!


    Jim

  5. #320
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    Default Re: Centennial

    thanks Jim, it's been a lot of fun so far. Centennials not a hot rod but she sails well, far better than I'd expect for what she is, and I;m sure there's more to come as I make improvements on her rig and ballast arrangement. The feeling sitting at the tiller is unlike any other dory I've sailed, more like a little friendship sloop or Tancook Whaler, she's a "Short" Ship
    Last edited by Daniel Noyes; 08-19-2017 at 09:48 AM.

  6. #321
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Bed boards in place, they are captured in position byt the seat risers and double rail on the centerboatrd trunk, a big 20d nail in a 1/4" hole on the trunk keeps them from sliding out while your sleeping and in place in the event of a knock down.

    Last edited by Daniel Noyes; 08-20-2017 at 09:13 PM.

  7. #322
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    Default Re: Centennial

    ballast bags/ burritos 45-50lbs each, 5 of them, ready to go in, and the ships stove, which will wait till after the Schooner Races.


  8. #323
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Centennial up in the Essex River for some much needed cosmetic prettying up before the Schooner Races debut! calking arnd deck structures and rigging flying jib are on the agenda, as well as a second coat of grey for her hatch cover.


    recent voyaging adventures here; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...383-Centennial



    and dressing ship descriptions to follow.
    Work continues at the historic location of AD Story Ship Yard launching ways.

  9. #324
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Did not see your boat in Salem. Did you go?

  10. #325
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by G.Sherman View Post
    Did not see your boat in Salem. Did you go?
    this photo is me trying to get there!... around that distant blue headland and to the west is the harbor of Salem,


    and an hour and a half later Centennial had brought me that horizon, this is that blue line, up close, Lanes Cove in Gloucester,



    but alas this is as far as I made it, the wind was heading me so I could not clear Hallibut point and on the tack back to clear the point the wind continued to weaken substantially, down to 8+- mph. I was thankful to make it into the Essex river before the tide turned against me.

    My initial departure got pushed back a day... but still a very do able day and 1/2 trip, I had the anchor up about 6 am at the mouth of the Ipswich River, within easy striking distance of Salem with anything close to fair wind by noon time... but the wind headed and died within sight of Hallibut point on Cape Anne.
    I ended up in Essex at the ship building museum across from Harold Burnhams yard.
    Last edited by Daniel Noyes; 08-30-2017 at 10:11 PM.

  11. #326
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    Bed boards in place, they are captured in position byt the seat risers and double rail on the centerboatrd trunk, a big 20d nail in a 1/4" hole on the trunk keeps them from sliding out while your sleeping and in place in the event of a knock down.


    So good to see pics of this dory sailing and being enjoyed.

    This pic of the large midships hatch shows the only place where I would make changes…….. I would build another smaller hatch into the after end of the big one, which would allow access when the big one is closed and pulled down with clamps (perhaps over-center steel one’s) or else lashings.
    Then I would have a leg or prop, that has one end on a hinge, fixed to the top of the centerboard case and which swings up then lodges under the big hatch, to serve as a support when the hatch is closed.
    Separate support stanchions could be easily clipped on outside the hatch when it is opened to the pop-up position and a tent-like cover pulled over the top for habitation at anchor.
    Here the smaller hatch can lift up (swinging up on it’s hinged edge forward) and will allow headroom for standing space with it’s own mini tent dodger- that could just as well be part of the main tent covering, if it has flaps to allow access.
    Use of the small hatch when underway, depends of course on it being altogether sealed closed. This I would achieve with close fitting edges and strip slicone or rubber seals.
    I would not attempt to achieve this with a purely wooden structure, but have done so (on other boat projects) and know how to do so using composite fabrication.
    This sandwich composites hatch will surely not impact on the fact that this boat is undoubtedly a wood boat and would just help in keeping the weight down and the water out.

  12. #327
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by Lugalong View Post
    So good to see pics of this dory sailing and being enjoyed.

    This pic of the large midships hatch shows the only place where I would make changes…….. I would build another smaller hatch into the after end of the big one, which would allow access when the big one is closed and pulled down with clamps (perhaps over-center steel one’s) or else lashings.
    Then I would have a leg or prop, that has one end on a hinge, fixed to the top of the centerboard case and which swings up then lodges under the big hatch, to serve as a support when the hatch is closed.
    Separate support stanchions could be easily clipped on outside the hatch when it is opened to the pop-up position and a tent-like cover pulled over the top for habitation at anchor.
    Here the smaller hatch can lift up (swinging up on it’s hinged edge forward) and will allow headroom for standing space with it’s own mini tent dodger- that could just as well be part of the main tent covering, if it has flaps to allow access.
    Use of the small hatch when underway, depends of course on it being altogether sealed closed. This I would achieve with close fitting edges and strip slicone or rubber seals.
    I would not attempt to achieve this with a purely wooden structure, but have done so (on other boat projects) and know how to do so using composite fabrication.
    This sandwich composites hatch will surely not impact on the fact that this boat is undoubtedly a wood boat and would just help in keeping the weight down and the water out.
    Lug youve hit on one of the biggest challenges/conundrums of this project, the main hatch is fraught with positives and negatives and many of the solutions i have considered have negatives of their own... I'm living with it for now, but the current solution is far from acceptable.

    2 Huge reasons that bother me are

    1 the boat is unrowable with the hatch securely in place, and it takes 5+- min to un tie the hatch and ready it to row.

    2 it is dificult to acess the cabin with the big heavy main hatch or through the bow hatch and little access to the interior while the boat is sailing at sea.


    I do feel you are right a small second hatch in the main hatch is necessary and I'd be interested to hear input on design ideas.... my current thinkling is something pretty light 1/4 inch marine ply on a pine frame and a coaming around it with foam seals and ropes and battens to dog it if necessary...scary thought.

    I actually was very happy how the hatch worked for sleeping and relaxing aboard in the up position, great little pop top, very cozy





    more sailing photos here: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...383-Centennial

  13. #328
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    Default Re: Centennial

    So how did Al do it?
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  14. #329
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    Lug youve hit on one of the biggest challenges/conundrums of this project, the main hatch is fraught with positives and negatives and many of the solutions i have considered have negatives of their own... I'm living with it for now, but the current solution is far from acceptable.

    2 Huge reasons that bother me are

    1 the boat is unrowable with the hatch securely in place, and it takes 5+- min to un tie the hatch and ready it to row.

    2 it is dificult to acess the cabin with the big heavy main hatch or through the bow hatch and little access to the interior while the boat is sailing at sea.


    I do feel you are right a small second hatch in the main hatch is necessary and I'd be interested to hear input on design ideas.... my current thinkling is something pretty light 1/4 inch marine ply on a pine frame and a coaming around it with foam seals and ropes and battens to dog it if necessary...scary thought.

    I actually was very happy how the hatch worked for sleeping and relaxing aboard in the up position, great little pop top, very cozy





    more sailing photos here: http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...383-Centennial

    Seems that the main problem is experienced when the big hatch is closed.
    So how about if the little hatch (which is hopefully only a little under 2ft square) can flip open to lie flush with the big hatch, so that you can seat yourself on it’s inside or underside when rowing, and with your feet arches placed on the after edge of the hatch opening.
    Sitting as it were on the middle of the big hatch( but on the open and upturned little hatch) support is needed to carry your body weight.
    This is why the prop is needed between the top of the Cboard case and the big hatch.
    When popping down through the little hatch, I imagine it should be easy enough if you move the bunk boards out of the way and make foot space either side of the case……this I can only imagine since I am not on the boat, and am only guaging things from the pics.
    Trickiest thing will be to build the hatch frames and coamings light and strong enough without being too heavy.
    Plywood with stringers and light athwartships frames might do fine for the big hatch, since the coaming is strong enough (being backed by the deck), but a light and strong coaming for the little hatch might do with metal or composites reinforcement.
    Laying up composites hatch rims with integral seal recesses makes sure of a tight fit.
    You fair the coamings to a high finish, and use them as moulds to laminate the matching hatch rim, after treating with release agent.
    Bonding wood to the composite laminated rims is fine, so there is no need to have the composites laminate showing. In fact, if the epoxy resin is pigmented, painting the rim inside edges will not even be necessary.
    Last edited by Lugalong; 09-01-2017 at 02:40 AM.

  15. #330
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Took a look at images of the original and at one of the few photos of the boat underway. Looks like the CB trunk split the hold in half, so that the hatch was in two parts split amidships. There was also some kind of small door or something, don't think it was big enough for a person in the bulkhead between the aft cockpit and the hold.

    So another way to think about it would be to turn your existing main hatch into a two part hatch. Either hinged or two pieces, but I'd be tempted to make the split across the boat since you don't have to deal with the trunk. Set it up so that it can be handled as one piece if you want it. Has the additional advantage of making the bits lighter and perhaps lashable down on deck when not needed, or small enough to stow below when you are out with friends.
    Last edited by Ben Fuller; 09-01-2017 at 06:53 AM.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  16. #331
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    Default Re: Centennial

    She is a gorgeous boat, Bravo!

  17. #332
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Great job on your Centennial Daniel! Nice to see you enjoying it also.

    In regards to your big hatch, like Ben said split it in two. With the aft half a slider that slides over to forward half giving you enough room for your legs. And the whole hatch can swing up when wanted. A question, do you have flotation built in?
    "Yeah, well, that's just, like your opinion man"
    -The Dude-

  18. #333
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Fuller View Post
    So how did Al do it?
    apparently at sea in rough conditions he sat in the steering well with the main hatch lashed/doged down his only access to below was through the small sliding window in the cockpit bulkhead... he weathered the storm and when he felt it saf could loosen the hatch and access the interior again... !!! pretty hard core.

  19. #334
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    Default Re: Centennial

    also his oar locks were at the standing well not main hatch, which would be a simple temporary solution for my current hatch issues.

  20. #335
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    Default Re: Centennial


  21. #336
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    Default Re: Centennial

    checking the fit for the stove...



  22. #337
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    Default Re: Centennial

    scarfing a plank, 1 year ago.


  23. #338
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    Default Re: Centennial

    stove install...


  24. #339
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    Default Re: Centennial


  25. #340
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    Default Re: Centennial

    mmm mmmmm Toasty!


  26. #341
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    Default Re: Centennial


  27. #342
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Would you mind hanging the rudder and posting a few pics of it and the transom? Id really like to see how you have it set up.
    Thanks.

    How was dinner??

  28. #343
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by willin woodworks View Post
    Would you mind hanging the rudder and posting a few pics of it and the transom? Id really like to see how you have it set up.
    Thanks.

    How was dinner??
    tasty, the country style ribs have a perfect balance of fat and meat!

    sure, Ill get some photos of the rudder hanging. The rudder is pretty simple, similar to the original as well as I can tell. two eye bolts and straps on the rudder, a 4' long rod goes through all pieces.


  29. #344
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post

    sure, Ill get some photos of the rudder hanging.
    you can see that the rudder is a very traditional, simple and pretty bullet proof affair, trailing edge hangs down below the bottom of the boat by about 4 inches and the leading edge is tucked up above a grounding/ wear plate to minimize the probability of picking up a line. the rudder head is glued and carriage bolted together.



  30. #345
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Looks good.
    Thanks.

  31. #346
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    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by willin woodworks View Post
    Looks good.
    Thanks.
    also possibly of interest as far as the rudder goes compare the waterline on the rudder of these 2 photos, granted the sailing photo has 3 people 600+- more pounds aboard but still the effect of the hull wave and the narrow raked transom drawing water up the stern to immerse the rudder is clearly visiable.


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