Page 9 of 10 FirstFirst ... 8910 LastLast
Results 281 to 315 of 321

Thread: Centennial

  1. #281
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    12,946

    Default Re: Centennial

    Congrats Dan, This popped up on FB
    http://fisherynation.com/archives/61109

  2. #282
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sweden,Scilly Isles, Siberia
    Posts
    7,721

    Default Re: Centennial

    I saw this little box cabin top on a dory in Suchers book, which might suit yours...




  3. #283
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    3,037

    Default Re: Centennial

    Looking forward to seeing her undersail at the Small Reach Regatta. Will make sure that there is something for the King when she goes over with a name? And I'll bring the conch. Better practice to see if I can still blow it.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Vernon Langille, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity and a quiver of unamed 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  4. #284
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    central cal
    Posts
    8,501

    Default Re: Centennial

    Daniel,

    More than anything, you are an inspiration to me for your doggedness. When choosing and building a boat, it is so easy to be distracted or worried or bothered or hesitant. Gosh. Lots of time to feel and think lots of things, eh?

    But, you just put your head down and plowed through. So sure of the choice once made.

    Because, really, all these boats we mess around with are foolish toys, eh? Sure, sure, links to the past, and connections to nature, and homages to the ingenious power of humans to create and invent, to solve problems and develop ideas, but such anachronistic means to that end, eh?

    But then, perhaps anachronism is what we seek? In that case, it must needs take a somewhat anachronistic outlook on work and time and objects to achieve these ends.

    And, you are a fine example of the bond we all share.

    Why wood? Why build? Why this boat? Why? Why? Why?

    Because. Just because.

    I sincerely wish you ten thousand times as many hours of enjoyment in her as you spent laboring over her creation. At least one quarter of those hours in weather so inclement you are forced below to read and think and sip hot drinks and nap in that snug little world.

    Peace,
    Robert

  5. #285
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    Congrats Dan, This popped up on FB
    http://fisherynation.com/archives/61109

    thanks! the same article made it in our local newspaper Newburyport Daily News on page 4 today

  6. #286
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    I saw this little box cabin top on a dory in Suchers book, which might suit yours...



    thanks i was unaware Sucher did a Centennial II... Bolger did one to.

  7. #287
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    Daniel,

    More than anything, you are an inspiration to me for your doggedness. When choosing and building a boat, it is so easy to be distracted or worried or bothered or hesitant. Gosh. Lots of time to feel and think lots of things, eh?

    But, you just put your head down and plowed through. So sure of the choice once made.

    Because, really, all these boats we mess around with are foolish toys, eh? Sure, sure, links to the past, and connections to nature, and homages to the ingenious power of humans to create and invent, to solve problems and develop ideas, but such anachronistic means to that end, eh?

    But then, perhaps anachronism is what we seek? In that case, it must needs take a somewhat anachronistic outlook on work and time and objects to achieve these ends.

    And, you are a fine example of the bond we all share.

    Why wood? Why build? Why this boat? Why? Why? Why?

    Because. Just because.

    I sincerely wish you ten thousand times as many hours of enjoyment in her as you spent laboring over her creation. At least one quarter of those hours in weather so inclement you are forced below to read and think and sip hot drinks and nap in that snug little world.

    Peace,
    Robert
    ...part of the speed of this build comes from having done this at a comercial shop, so I know what needs to be done when, especially with the hull, the decking and hatches were new to me and took far longer than I had anticipated.

    but thats how to build your boat... not all at once, just build one piece, then build another... one piece at a time.

  8. #288
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    bolting 100 lbs of steel and lead to the board.


  9. #289
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    well I got the board back in her on Sunday and was headed north toward Richmond, Camden and Brooklin by noon on Tuesday!

    what a great weekend!

    Centennial performed well, nothing broke! She sailed for the first time Thursday morning with light weather helm and a satisfactory set to her sails and rig. I did need to swap out some of the Manilla line I had in the running rigging, it got wet in a down pour on Tuesday on the highway and blew up to the point it would not run in the blocks.

    Friday was the first windty day with 15+- mph blowing across the Bay. We were reaching the length of the bay from Atlantic Boat out to Pond island and back a couple times, big bow wave and spray flying to leeward, foam racing along the gunnel 3-4 inches above the water, myself and 2 friends perched on the high side with huge grins, tiller bowing rudder with good bite, rig straining slack stays to leeward, what a day! Saturday more of the same!


    Photo by Ralph Szur

    Last edited by Daniel Noyes; 07-25-2017 at 12:12 PM.

  10. #290
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Salem, MA
    Posts
    125

    Default Re: Centennial

    Hooray and congrats.

    Looking better and better with every new picture

    Simply. Dashing.

  11. #291
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Placerville, CA
    Posts
    806

    Default Re: Centennial

    She looks great under sail!
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    "The man who makes no mistakes does not usually make anything"

    Roosevelt, Theodore

  12. #292
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    5,105

    Default Re: Centennial

    Just wonderful!

  13. #293
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by nedL View Post
    Just wonderful!
    excellent photo collection of the week by Mike Duncan here
    https://www.facebook.com/mike.duncan...1&l=085aff7af8

    here we are Saturday hitting the beach at Pond and floating at anchor with the rest of the fleet during lunch.



  14. #294
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,635

    Default Re: Centennial

    Great work, Dan--and such a fast build, too.

    From the photos she does seem to float very high--are you planning some ballast?

    More importantly, when's the first big cruise? I'm guessing you're not going to start with an Atlantic crossing...

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    Jagular Goes Everywhere: (mis)Adventures in a $300 Sailboat. Book release November 2014.

  15. #295
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    lots of work yet to do finishing the interior. we had arnd 40 gallons of water on the bottom, I'm figuring now weather more water or some solid ballast is a better way to go. I would like to put another 200 lbs in her. The first small trip planned is to Gloucester for the Schooner Races, Labor Day weekend.

    rigging in the shade on Wednesday afternoon, water ballast on the ground.

    Last edited by Daniel Noyes; 07-25-2017 at 10:52 PM.

  16. #296
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    pulled Centennial's rig today, prepping to finish her interior, lots of painting and joinery to do on the inside as well as making her main hatch cover, and figure out a more permanent ballast set up and lots of re-rigging.

    I ran my hand along her sheer strake today and it came off caked in sea salt! a beautiful thing, cant wait to get her salty again

  17. #297
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    3,037

    Default Re: Centennial

    Running a chase boat on Saturday after the breeze came up ( Dan kind of had to wait out the morning calm) Centennial 2 was stomping along bone in teeth etc. Unfortunately the photogs were too far away to get that pic but it would have been the one to have. I have found that when the breeze comes up people seem to put away the cameras.

    For ballast, I wouldn't be surprised if Al had a nice lot of railroad rail cut into 50 pound lengths, but lead was also cheap in those days. Issue for Dan is dealing with the trailer as you don't want a ballasted boat bouncing down the road. One friend has trays on his trailer where the lead lengths live and are easily loaded on board before a launch. It is good to have lead or any kind of solid ballast riding on frames not planking. I've done custom pigs cast to live on top of intermediate frames, locked in by main frames.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Vernon Langille, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity and a quiver of unamed 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  18. #298
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Waterbury, Connecticut
    Posts
    1,916

    Default Re: Centennial

    Glad to hear the good news! --Wade

  19. #299
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    11,637

    Default Re: Centennial

    Congratulations on your launch, Dan.

  20. #300
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    thanks guys, I'm just imagining the 3 of us out on Gloucester harbor in 15kts... course it would be a bit longer trip to Gloucester town for James than Wade!


  21. #301
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Decatur, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    138

    Default Re: Centennial

    Congratulations, Dan! She sure looks good out there in the breeze!

  22. #302
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,221

    Default Re: Centennial



    There's some skippering going on here, fo'sho'. (Photo by Mike H)

  23. #303
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by callsign222 View Post

    There's some skippering going on here, fo'sho'. (Photo by Mike H)
    it's kind of hard not to start "skippering"... as soon as you clamber aboard Centennial a horn pipe starts playing, it's infectious!
    seriously, when can you go sailing next?


    I think this boat has more in her, I was trying to take it easy at SRR and not break anything, also I think I'm getting lazy, we could have flown the flying jib on this tack and from the shape of her waves (almost non existent) this hull has a few more MPH left in her.

    also I have some eyebolts in the deck aft of the steering station where I could attach a basic set of running backs for off the wind. once I'm more familiar with this rig and her handling I think Centennial may be able to handle another 8-10 mph of wind before needing to shorten sail...

    cant wait for labor day and the schooner races

  24. #304
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Waterbury, Connecticut
    Posts
    1,916

    Default Re: Centennial

    Is that with about 150 pounds of water ballast? --Wade

  25. #305
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by wtarzia View Post
    Is that with about 150 pounds of water ballast? --Wade
    the above photos are of the boat with 36-38 gallons of water in the bilge and 100 lbs of steel and lead on the lower edge of the wooden centerboard.

    I'm looking into a few alternatives, putting another 80-100 lbs on the board and/or 150-200 lbs of metal ballast inside on the floor.

    the visuals on this hull are deceptive, from some angles she looks chubby and jaunty and curvacious and in other shots rather angular, slab sided gaunt and lean. The hull is 6' wide at the rail but only about 4' at the waterline.

    the original Centennial certainly has a basic no nonsense air about it bordering on the austere in a chilling sort of way, to think a man was alone on the open Atlantic in 1876 (with no hope of rescue in the event of a mishap) in this boat for 50+ days is both thrilling and horrifying.
    Last edited by Daniel Noyes; 08-02-2017 at 09:18 PM.

  26. #306
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Dedham, MA
    Posts
    772

    Default Re: Centennial

    I saw the photos from the Reach" regatta. Sits kind of high doesn't she? No movable ballast required in the original?

  27. #307
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Cushing, Maine
    Posts
    3,037

    Default Re: Centennial

    Don't think that movable ballast was used on the transatlantic voyage. My guess is iron or lead, with iron being cheaper. She'd have been carrying a pretty good load of supplies.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Vernon Langille, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity and a quiver of unamed 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  28. #308
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    Main Hatch going on and pop top going up!... Mast Boot to boot, now she can be closed off to rain, spray and God forbid, green water on deck.






  29. #309
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Mountain lakes of Vermont
    Posts
    9,275

    Default Re: Centennial

    Things are looking good. One question about the mast tabernackle. I see the holes for the pivot bolt, but shouldn't there be another bolt lower down to lock mast and tabernackle together? Just mentioning this because I had one on mine. What holds your mast upright while you're attaching stays?
    Just curious of other ways to do things.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  30. #310
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Norwich,United Kingdom
    Posts
    4,729

    Default Re: Centennial

    Any hardware locking the mast in place is really for insurance.A forestay alone will hold the mast in place.Ideally,the heel of the mast will just contact the base of the tabernacle so that the pivot is not subjected to bending loads.

  31. #311
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    Things are looking good. One question about the mast tabernackle. I see the holes for the pivot bolt, but shouldn't there be another bolt lower down to lock mast and tabernackle together? Just mentioning this because I had one on mine. What holds your mast upright while you're attaching stays?
    Just curious of other ways to do things.
    the idea is that the stays and rig will remain on the boat most of the time (I have everything off at the moment to do interior work and build the hatch cover) the mast is raised with the shrouds all attached, the forestay is run to a set of pulleys with a line led back to the cockpit, so you can stand on the bridge deck with line in hand and lift the mast then pull the line to take up and tension the forestay, works very well with such a small mast.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    Any hardware locking the mast in place is really for insurance.A forestay alone will hold the mast in place.Ideally,the heel of the mast will just contact the base of the tabernacle so that the pivot is not subjected to bending loads.
    true, the stays are the only thing holding up the mast, if they let go with wind in the sail the mast is coming down locking bolts or no. If I had it to do again I would likely make the cheeks of the tabernackle shorter, I was thinking of putting a little cabin top over the main hatch and wanted the mast when lowered to lay parallel to the sheer and above the cabin top, without the raised top there is no need for such height obn the pivot bolt... maybe next time.

  32. #312
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    Things are looking good. One question about the mast tabernackle. I see the holes for the pivot bolt, but shouldn't there be another bolt lower down to lock mast and tabernackle together? Just mentioning this because I had one on mine. What holds your mast upright while you're attaching stays?
    Just curious of other ways to do things.
    thinking a little more on the locking bolt, it may be a good idea for this rig on long passages to be able to put a fairly light, maybe 1/4 inch bolt through near the base of the mast, say 2 inches above the juncture with the stub mast to keep the mast base securely on the tabernackle stub.

    many tabernackles have the mast stub and mast cut at t fairly steep angle, 20% across the entire botttom and would need a locking bolt to keeep the bottom of the mast from wanting to slide off the stub when down force from the stays is applied.

    this mast and stub are cut parallel for the distance from front of mast to directly under the pivot bolt, so there is a flat section for the thrust of the mast to bear on, behind the pivot bolt the mast and stub are cut to a radius slightly smaller that the radius from pivot bolt to mast base, this means everything just clears as the mast is swung upright and tightens up as it reaches vertical.

  33. #313
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Whangarei New Zealand
    Posts
    392

    Default Re: Centennial

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    Main Hatch going on and pop top going up!... Mast Boot to boot, now she can be closed off to rain, spray and God forbid, green water on deck.





    Daniel, this is sure looking really good and the pop top is getting on its way toward the design that I have in mind.

    Sealing of the perimeter with a fabric skirt (for when used in the ‘up position) and rubber seal strip (when in the ‘down’ closwd position) is where tie-downs with aid of lugs on the hatch and cleats on the deck can help to secure the big hatch, then a smaller one needs to be added for access.
    Explaining how I see the small hatch being included, is going to be too complicated using words. As yet I am still not able to post the sketchy drawings done of the thing, so will leave off trying to explain with words.

  34. #314
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    yes it's a bit of a conundrum... first the heavy manilla line you see at the forward edge of the hatch and hanging beside each prop on the aft edge, caqn be run through holes in the coaming/deck beams behind and used with wedges/battens to secure the hatch from the inside in the down position... only problem is then the only access in or out is the bow hatch, which is ok for keeping water out of the main sleeping area but seems problematic if there is heavy weather. Im not liking the idea of crawling around the mast and opening the bow hatch.

    the original has the main hatch cover and no other means of getting into the below decks, no smaller hatch in the big hatch, though that is an option. I am hoping that his boat sees very little water on deck as the idea of waves la4rge and steep enough to wash over her bow is terrifying, but heavy spray and wind driven torrential rain is a very real possability.

    I agree I'll need to make up some canvas to fill in the three open sides of the lean to formed by the open hatch, it could be quite comfortable camping in there with the pop top up.

  35. #315
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    North Shore, Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,253

    Default Re: Centennial

    also I had to rig a bit of a contraption so I could lower the hatch and not have the legs jam on the seat or seat risers or inards/sides of the boat. you can probably just make out a string going from the bottom of the legs forward and then across the front edge of the hatch, another line comes from there to the middle back edge of the hatch, where I can grab it when lowering the hatch. to lower the hatch I pull on that center string which pulls the string attached to the two legs and folds them forward and pulls them against the inner surface of the hatch, the cabin top , then I hook the string on a little cleat to keep tension and then lower the hatch into place.


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •