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Thread: Building a drum sander

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    Cool thread! Thanks for posting it Fred.

    I'm thinking about a belt sander/disk sander combo in my near(ish) future...
    Jarndyce and Jarndyce

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  2. #37
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewpatrol View Post
    Fred, this site has some home made machinery and there's one sander that may give you ideas. Check the video's. Fast fwd the jokes though.

    http://www.stumpynubs.com/homemade-tools.html
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    Thanks Peter. This project has a little stall right now, as I focus on my Argie 15, now before the weather gets colder.

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    A good idea ! I quite like the hand turned feed on that one, very simple.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    I still like the feed belt idea so this page has some good ideas but for a narrower belt but still applicable . http://woodgears.ca/belt_sander/adjust.html
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  6. #41
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    I have been looking a lot at Woodgears videos. Many good ideas there! I have decided to make feeding rollers, one on each side of the sanding drum. On the thiknesser wie have there is a feeding roll only on the entry side, so you have to pull the plank thru at the end.

    Fred

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    So 4 rollers all covered with fine sandpaper ? If that's what you mean you could connect all 4 shafts with a belt or chain so they turn at the same rate and drive it with reduced motor or a hand crank.

    PS, as the top rollers would need to be adjustable over a range (how much ?) you would need a chain as it can work loose and still engage the teeth of the sprockets.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  8. #43
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    Maybe more like two feeding drums. Here is my start on one of them. They will be connected whith a bicyckle chain

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    Last edited by Fredostli; 08-20-2016 at 07:38 AM.

  9. #44
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    Maybe this explains better Peter https://youtu.be/Ie5DoYppaXE

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  10. #45
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    It explains very well Fred, thank you .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  11. #46
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    Default Edge glue boards for clinker lapstrake?

    Time to continue on the drum-sander. Making feeding rollers.

  12. #47
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    I will use Springs from a trampoline to hold the feeder down allowing it to grab the piece

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  13. #48
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    Drum sanders are very nice. I used to have the dual-drum sander from General International, and found it to be even more useful than I had envisioned. Nice project for someone who has more time than money. If you are monetizing your labor, however, it makes far more sense to buy existing used equipment. But we each have to do our own calculus. The 37" version probably sells new for $5 - 6k. Used, I'd expect to pay 1/3 - 1/2 of that. Truly useful tools.

    David G
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    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    The closest hardware-stores dont know what a drum-sander is , but a few resellers have machines like this, but in other parts of the country. And they cost a lot more than I can spend. I do like to build it also, inspired after building a bandsaw mill. ;-)

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    Quote Originally Posted by Fredostli View Post
    The closest hardware-stores dont know what a drum-sander is , but a few resellers have machines like this, but in other parts of the country. And they cost a lot more than I can spend. I do like to build it also, inspired after building a bandsaw mill. ;-)
    I wasn't questioning YOUR choice. As I said, we all have to do the math and make our own decisions. I was simply pointing out that there IS a choice. I probably should add also that home built tools like this never really function as well as the purchased tool. Adequately? Yes, often. Comparablly? Seldom, if ever.

    But I applaud your decision to build yourself one. I doubt you'll be disappointed.
    David G
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    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    These seem to be the only small commercially available thickness sanders in Australia, at around $1300 they aren't cheap but they also don't inspire confidence.https://www.machines4u.com.au/view/a...sander/345894/

    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  17. #52
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    Using stuff I already have, mu build Will cost maximum $50 😀

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  18. #53
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    I have a good steel sander drum but if I go the way of two powered pressure feed rollers I'll have to build them, I have some 10mm wall, 75mm diameter PVC pipe that would make good feed rollers.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  19. #54
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    Making a rig for the router. I Just drag the drum thru while turning it. A method that could be used for making mast too maybe?




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  20. #55
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    Peter this is Just laminated Pieces of partikkelboard. Not to hard to make feeding rollers this way 😉

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  21. #56
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    I made the sanding drum that way but it moved and became unusable, thus the steel one. The PVC just needs a couple of discs glued into the ends to hold the shaft.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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  22. #57
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    Ok. Moved in what way?

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  23. #58
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    These seem to be the only small commercially available thickness sanders in Australia, at around $1300 they aren't cheap but they also don't inspire confidence.https://www.machines4u.com.au/view/a...sander/345894/

    This is a knock-off... or a re-badging... of a U.S. tool (Performax) that's been around for years. Early on - they were too lightweight to be reliable. They broke. They wouldn't stay in adjustment. They weren't accurate. The arm was too wimpy to keep the drum parallel to the feed belt.

    In recent years, they've upgraded, and upgraded again. Now - at least some of their line is getting good reviews. I'd call it a step up from a shop-built tool, but not a huge step. And the older ones would be a step down. An exercise in frustration for all but the very lightest of work.

    And I'd be quite leery of buying a used version of the tool, as there are far more wimpy ones out there (each new owner seemed to eventually give up on them, and offer them for sale) than there are solid ones (which owners seem to hang onto).

    https://www.amazon.com/Supermax-7193...564275&sr=1-34

    David G
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    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  24. #59
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    Regarding the Performax sander: It seems that the machine of yore is no longer made by Performax, but by Jet. Maybe it's only marketed by Jet, but that's the name painted on them. I first found this out when I had to order a new carrier belt for my Performax 16-32. I couldn't find one... only the Jet. Same thing but it confused this old man for a while.

    That Supermax looks to be quite a bit more robust. I hope it also has more power. My chief complaint with my machine (circa. 2002) is it's lack of power. I can take only a slight amount off on each pass even on rather narrow boards. Any more and the breaker trips on the motor. This can be frustrating if I have a lot of stock to run. Otherwise I really like the finish I get off of the machine and there's no tear-out as one can get with a planer. Also, no snipe.

    I reckon any drum sander is better than none. But I'd never buy another gutless wonder like I have.

    Jeff

  25. #60
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    Regarding the Performax sander: It seems that the machine of yore is no longer made by Performax, but by Jet. Maybe it's only marketed by Jet, but that's the name painted on them. I first found this out when I had to order a new carrier belt for my Performax 16-32. I couldn't find one... only the Jet. Same thing but it confused this old man for a while.

    That Supermax looks to be quite a bit more robust. I hope it also has more power. My chief complaint with my machine (circa. 2002) is it's lack of power. I can take only a slight amount off on each pass even on rather narrow boards. Any more and the breaker trips on the motor. This can be frustrating if I have a lot of stock to run. Otherwise I really like the finish I get off of the machine and there's no tear-out as one can get with a planer. Also, no snipe.

    I reckon any drum sander is better than none. But I'd never buy another gutless wonder like I have.

    Jeff
    Yes, iirc, Performax was bought by the holding company that also owns Jet several years ago. They kept the Performax label for a bit, then started labeling them Jet.

    The inability to hog off large quantities of material is inherent to a 'drum sander'. You're only going to be able to take of tiny skims of material. There are such creatures as 'abrasive planers'... but they are much bigger, with large industrial 3-phase 220 or 440 motors, and cost many multiples of what your little drum sander did.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  26. #61
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    Before it was a Performax it was a Ryobi (I have the Ryobi). Fine enough given the low price used. You need a decent dust collection system.

  27. #62
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    They certainly don't look very strong and I like a belt and pulley on a motor so if I burn it out I can replace it .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  28. #63
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    I'm enjoying this discussion as Ive been looking at the Jet sanders but after this I think I'll think again. Thanks.

  29. #64
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewpatrol View Post
    I'm enjoying this discussion as Ive been looking at the Jet sanders but after this I think I'll think again. Thanks.

    Since my post might have helped put you off the Jet, I feel like I ought to clarify things a little. True, I think my sander is woefully underpowered. (Perhaps the new one's have corrected for this.) Being under powered means taking very shallow "cuts" but it doesn't compromise the quality or accuracy of the machine. When I first got the machine, brand new, I spent an hour or so setting it up. I got it to sand a uniform thickness across it's 16" width. I haven't had to adjust it again. It is still accurate and I think that speaks well for the machine. I've had to replace the drive/transport belt one time. When I put the new one on, the machine held the adjustment. I didn't have to fiddle with anything to get the belt to track properly. I think that speaks well for the machine.

    I also have a 12" planer in my shop. The planer will remove stock much faster from rough boards so I turn to it for that purpose. But the planer has built in snipe so I lose 2 1/2" on both ends; like all planers, it's prone to chip-out; and planing very thin stock (less than 1/4") requires a bottom spacer and the planer can result in chatter that will ruin the cut. The sander has none of these limitations. It will finish a piece uniformly thick, no snipe, and quite thin. I recently sanded some veneer down to 1/16" thick. One simply has to take a light cut and/or reduce the feed speed to a snails pace.

    It helps to be patient with the machine. But consider doing it by hand and even this slow machine is an overall time saver. And probably more accurate. When I was still in business I considered acquiring a wide belt sander. The price for this was never anything I could quite justify especially considering the footprint required in a small shop. The Performax is on casters and can easily be rolled around. Bottom line... if my machine crapped out today, I'd get something to replace it and continue practicing my deep breathing exercises for patience.

    Jeff

  30. #65
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Conway View Post
    Before it was a Performax it was a Ryobi (I have the Ryobi). Fine enough given the low price used. You need a decent dust collection system.
    For sure on the dust collection... for any powered sander, but esp. for something like a stroke sander, wide-belt sander, or drum sander.

    I believe, though I haven't researched it, that the Ryobi was a parallel development, not affiliated with Performax or Jet, and even wimpier than either.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  31. #66
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    Since my post might have helped put you off the Jet, I feel like I ought to clarify things a little. True, I think my sander is woefully underpowered. (Perhaps the new one's have corrected for this.) Being under powered means taking very shallow "cuts" but it doesn't compromise the quality or accuracy of the machine. When I first got the machine, brand new, I spent an hour or so setting it up. I got it to sand a uniform thickness across it's 16" width. I haven't had to adjust it again. It is still accurate and I think that speaks well for the machine. I've had to replace the drive/transport belt one time. When I put the new one on, the machine held the adjustment. I didn't have to fiddle with anything to get the belt to track properly. I think that speaks well for the machine.

    I also have a 12" planer in my shop. The planer will remove stock much faster from rough boards so I turn to it for that purpose. But the planer has built in snipe so I lose 2 1/2" on both ends; like all planers, it's prone to chip-out; and planing very thin stock (less than 1/4") requires a bottom spacer and the planer can result in chatter that will ruin the cut. The sander has none of these limitations. It will finish a piece uniformly thick, no snipe, and quite thin. I recently sanded some veneer down to 1/16" thick. One simply has to take a light cut and/or reduce the feed speed to a snails pace.

    It helps to be patient with the machine. But consider doing it by hand and even this slow machine is an overall time saver. And probably more accurate. When I was still in business I considered acquiring a wide belt sander. The price for this was never anything I could quite justify especially considering the footprint required in a small shop. The Performax is on casters and can easily be rolled around. Bottom line... if my machine crapped out today, I'd get something to replace it and continue practicing my deep breathing exercises for patience.

    Jeff
    Well stated.

    Also - I suspect your planer issues are amenable to corrections. The snipe is often correctable by adjusting feed roller tension and such. Your chip-out by adjusting the chip-breaker. Just read up a bit on fettling the machine... and on feed technique to further minimize the snipe.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  32. #67
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    I bought the 16-32 Jet drum sander new in 2013, after reading quite a bit about problems with older models. What I read ruled out used machines. The newer editions are 1 1/2 hp, which is strong enough to sand a 16" board. The new ones also have electronic speed control. If the motor starts bogging down, the gizmo slows the feed rate. It works well and I've never tripped the breaker despite trying take off too much stock. Drum alignment and belt tracking are straightforward but I still find them a bit of a pain to get dialed in exactly. Drum deflection doesn't seem to be a problem.

    Overall this is a decent machine that was a useful addition to my other shop tools. It does have some limitations. The belt table is quite small and long stock needs to be precisely supported on infeed and outfeed. It can snipe just like a planer. It is really only for final fit and finish. 1/64" is the max amount of removal per pass. Wide boards, 1/128" max. I get close with a TS or BS/planer and then two or three passes on the DS.

    I'd recommend this machine but if I had the shekels and space, I'd get a larger 22/44.

  33. #68
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    Default Re: Building a drum sander

    http://www.stumpynubs.com/3-3.html

    theres some more about making a sander in this latest issue

  34. #69
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    I am using trampoline Springs, fastened to the ball bearings with a tube clamp and a string, to make the driver drums push down



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  35. #70
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    Yeah I know...its a really rusty redneck project 😀

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