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Thread: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

  1. #3326
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Years ago I worked in Sint Maarten for a few months & the job came with a "car" to use. It was an old Passat that had a really rusty floor. They had pulled out all the seats & carpet, covered the holes with loose sheet metal & poured a couple of inches of concrete in. Seats were then mounted with expanding fasteners.

    Sure went around corners well, but the extra (300 lbs?) weight didn't help acceleration or braking.


    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Chris, before you do any work removing concrete please buy a dirty water submersible pump for use in an emergency. The big box stores have them.
    Good call navydog. Fortunately I already have one. I always figured that a decent submersible pump was a required tool for anyone owning an old wooden boat? Useful for so many occasions. Like the day a few years ago I got a call that Temptation, a 30' Chris Craft we owned for a while, was sinking in the slip. I rushed down there with the pump and sure enough, she had a good 12" of water in the bilge. Which was strange as she had never leaked a drop before then. An hour or so with the pump got the water out. At the moment I don't recall why the automatic bilge pump didn't kick in and I never did find any cause for the leak. She was dry as usual after we pumped her out and nothing like that ever happened again. About the only thing I could come up with was that it was a very hot summer and maybe some seam opened up enough to start leaking water in. As she went lower more topside seams started leaking but then they swelled up once they were under water.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Hire a stone cutter and score the top as deep as you dare. Then use cold chisels as wedges to crack from the score down to the plank. Might make breaking it out easier.
    Hm. I think a stone cutter might be overkill. At the same time after doing some research, it sounds like a multitool might not do the job. Most recommendations are for an angle grinder. Which I don't own (well, not an electric one at least. I have an air grinder somewhere) but would be a useful thing to have.

    Maybe I should get more specific about the concrete project. The concrete is actually used in a couple of different ways. Aft of the fish hold and forward of the engine it's just filler between the frames.





    But under the engine and in the hold it's a sizable block of ballast extending to or above the top of the keel and well out to the side:



    I think it could be possible to remove the filler concrete in the water with careful application of tools, avoiding any major stress on the hull. On the other hand that big block is going to take some work and would be better left for the haulout.

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    I've not seen mention that the concrete offers any kind of structural element maybe even serves the same structural purpose the floors would serve, but what do I know, except that I'm in the mood for cherry pie lol
    Key lime for me please Denise

  2. #3327
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    I think there's a good chance a lot of that cement will just lift out.
    I still have 2 Harbor Freight $17 right angle grinders that we used when we built the wheeled cradle for my sailboat.

    The incredible amount of dust that's generated when cutting stone or concrete also means running a vacuum.

    Hammering on concrete while she's sitting in the water worries me.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  3. #3328

    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Harbor Freight is your friend , There is place for the high quality German made angle grinder, this isn't it . Concrete dust is almost as bad as fiberglass dust on you and the grinder. So the cheap Chinese disposable diamond blades and 4 1/2" mini grinder should make easy work of the concrete. Diamond saws are used wet, both for cooling and dust, so you need a squirt bottle as well. When using a 110 volt tool in wet, I use a GFI cord, and in this case some rubber gloves as well. Most tools are double insulated, you don't get buzzed any more, but cheap Chinese, who knows.

    Smaller the grid you cut , the easier it's going to be to break to break them loose. Most steel chisels are going to have a steep angle, you want one with a flatter angle, both for less force on the boat bottom and more lateral force. I have been impressed with German chisels, they are not the hex shape of the common chisel, rather a much more flat. When while rock hounding in eastern Oregon, our standard chisel split, I picked up a German made one in a local hardware/ building supply store. It made rock splitting easier.
    Last edited by Downwindtracker2; 09-14-2018 at 10:31 AM.

  4. #3329
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    An air grinder sounds perfect, you can set up a water stream to keep the blade cool and kill most of the dust without fear of dying.

  5. #3330
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    I don't know, but a rented 14 inch gas powered Diamond blade seems appealing! Easy as cutting pie? I don't think so. Lol

    For those that want to get technical
    https://youtu.be/wcS37A_jy0w
    Last edited by DeniseO30; 09-14-2018 at 06:51 PM.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    For such a big depth of concrete I would use a core drill and detail with the multitool. Angle grinder also works but is more difficult to control. Wear a full body suit and respirator.

  7. #3332
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I'm not in favor of using a grinder to cut the concrete at all. Eventually the planks will get cut and you will have gouged and cut lines on the inside of the planks weakening them even further. It's dirty as hell as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumars View Post
    For such a big depth of concrete I would use a core drill and detail with the multitool. Angle grinder also works but is more difficult to control. Wear a full body suit and respirator.
    It must be 25 years ago I had to rent a diamond core drill set up for a job where we had to run piping through pre-stressed concrete, it was interesting, very expensive, but cheaper than paying a drilling contractor,. the water & soupy mud was pretty hard to keep under control although but it didn't matter too much because it was a open construction site.

    The rig came with all kinds of attachments and even a vacuum pump which I was confused about but my fore person at the time, quickly knew what to do, and showed me how it was designed to hold the rig to a wet concrete floor with the vacuum pump, it also had bars and jack type attachments I guess to brace it down from the ceiling which we did not have to do, it is a fun day! days 2 & 3 I was in the office watching the dollar signs cha chinging in the tool rental shop's direction.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  9. #3334
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Just to be a wet blanket: the frame butts have been assessed as predominantly sound; the neccessary sistering will take place well clear of the bilges, at the frame heads. Floor timbers were deemed unneccessary to her much harder life as a working fishing boat, and the soundness of the decision to abstain from floor timbers has been proven by her continued existance. If you ask me, that nice dry bilge looks pretty darn good, all things considered, and the big questions about the planks in that lowest area are all about refastening --which can't happen there until she's out of the water, and doesn't involve the cement anyway. When it comes right down to it, you won't know anything about the planks underneath the concrete until you start poking them with an awl --from underneath, while the boat's on the hard.

    So why is everyone so interested in busting out the concrete?

    I know I don't have a huge amount of experience here, but the little bit I have all reinforces the truism "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." Those bilges --planks, frame butts, etc.-- don't look broken.

    It sure seems like the concrete is becoming a distraction from the far more important task of sistering the frame heads.

    Or am I missing something?

    Alex

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    Alex ^5
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    I think there's a good chance a lot of that cement will just lift out.
    I still have 2 Harbor Freight $17 right angle grinders that we used when we built the wheeled cradle for my sailboat.

    The incredible amount of dust that's generated when cutting stone or concrete also means running a vacuum.

    Hammering on concrete while she's sitting in the water worries me.
    Quote Originally Posted by Downwindtracker2 View Post
    Harbor Freight is your friend , There is place for the high quality German made angle grinder, this isn't it . Concrete dust is almost as bad as fiberglass dust on you and the grinder. So the cheap Chinese disposable diamond blades and 4 1/2" mini grinder should make easy work of the concrete. Diamond saws are used wet, both for cooling and dust, so you need a squirt bottle as well. When using a 110 volt tool in wet, I use a GFI cord, and in this case some rubber gloves as well. Most tools are double insulated, you don't get buzzed any more, but cheap Chinese, who knows.

    Smaller the grid you cut , the easier it's going to be to break to break them loose. Most steel chisels are going to have a steep angle, you want one with a flatter angle, both for less force on the boat bottom and more lateral force. I have been impressed with German chisels, they are not the hex shape of the common chisel, rather a much more flat. When while rock hounding in eastern Oregon, our standard chisel split, I picked up a German made one in a local hardware/ building supply store. It made rock splitting easier.
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    An air grinder sounds perfect, you can set up a water stream to keep the blade cool and kill most of the dust without fear of dying.
    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    I don't know, but a rented 14 inch gas powered Diamond blade seems appealing! Easy as cutting pie? I don't think so. Lol

    For those that want to get technical
    https://youtu.be/wcS37A_jy0w
    Quote Originally Posted by Rumars View Post
    For such a big depth of concrete I would use a core drill and detail with the multitool. Angle grinder also works but is more difficult to control. Wear a full body suit and respirator.
    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    I'm not in favor of using a grinder to cut the concrete at all. Eventually the planks will get cut and you will have gouged and cut lines on the inside of the planks weakening them even further. It's dirty as hell as well.
    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    It must be 25 years ago I had to rent a diamond core drill set up for a job where we had to run piping through pre-stressed concrete, it was interesting, very expensive, but cheaper than paying a drilling contractor,. the water & soupy mud was pretty hard to keep under control although but it didn't matter too much because it was a open construction site.

    The rig came with all kinds of attachments and even a vacuum pump which I was confused about but my fore person at the time, quickly knew what to do, and showed me how it was designed to hold the rig to a wet concrete floor with the vacuum pump, it also had bars and jack type attachments I guess to brace it down from the ceiling which we did not have to do, it is a fun day! days 2 & 3 I was in the office watching the dollar signs cha chinging in the tool rental shop's direction.
    Ok, so I have to say I'm somewhat disinclined toward any technique that involves running water, soupy mud, choking dust and everything else that has been described. Might need to go to plan B here. Not sure exactly what "plan B" looks like but probably a lot more chiseling and a lot less grinding. One thing I know but haven't shared is that the concrete was poured very dry and it tends to crumble pretty easily. I suspect that if I start at the edge and work in I can chip it out with a sledge, a chisel and patience. Not as fast as the power tool option but way less messy. I might even go so far as to prop a couple of boat stands under the area where I'm working (this is on the hard mind you) to provide support.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pitsligo View Post
    Just to be a wet blanket: the frame butts have been assessed as predominantly sound; the neccessary sistering will take place well clear of the bilges, at the frame heads. Floor timbers were deemed unneccessary to her much harder life as a working fishing boat, and the soundness of the decision to abstain from floor timbers has been proven by her continued existance. If you ask me, that nice dry bilge looks pretty darn good, all things considered, and the big questions about the planks in that lowest area are all about refastening --which can't happen there until she's out of the water, and doesn't involve the cement anyway. When it comes right down to it, you won't know anything about the planks underneath the concrete until you start poking them with an awl --from underneath, while the boat's on the hard.

    So why is everyone so interested in busting out the concrete?

    I know I don't have a huge amount of experience here, but the little bit I have all reinforces the truism "if it ain't broke, don't fix it." Those bilges --planks, frame butts, etc.-- don't look broken.

    It sure seems like the concrete is becoming a distraction from the far more important task of sistering the frame heads.

    Or am I missing something?

    Alex
    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Alex ^5
    Alex, that's a great question. And I actually have an answer. All of this work on the hull is preliminary to building the new aft deck. Which is going to be quite a bit lower than the original deck, reducing the space underneath from crouching height to crawling height. The scenario I want to avoid is having to chip out all of that concrete after the deck is in place, at which point it will be much harder to do. Otherwise I agree - that part of the hull doesn't seem too bad and I wouldn't even be thinking about dealing with it at this point. Of course I could just ignore it for now and assume that if I do decide that I need to remove it at some point in the future I will just pull a few planks and do it from the bottom. But either way I don't have to decide until Petrel is out of the water.

    As for the condition of the planks under the ballast, I'm reasonably certain that they are in decent condition. I tapped out the hull when I first looked Petrel over in 2014 and it was entirely solid with the exception of the rot below the scuppers on the port side. And subsequently Mark Lerdahl also had a close look at it when we recaulked the garboards last year. He did do some refastening but there was no problem in driving new fasteners and there were no bad planks other than those on the port side, which we replaced at that time.

    You're also right that the main issues I'm dealing with are at the frame heads. However I am concerned about the original iron fasteners and what they may be doing to the oak frames below the ballast. I *think* things are not too bad down there but the only way to know for sure is to remove the ballast or remove some planks - which might lead to removing the ballast anyway. So under the assumption that there will eventually be iron sickness at the bottom of the frames just as there is at the top now, I'm inclined to sister them all the way to the keel as a precaution.

    Maybe I'm overthinking all of this. It's true that the current project is to repair the tops of the frames. I can do that regardless of the concrete and I should just focus on getting that task done. But I'm also trying to plan ahead a bit.

  12. #3337
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    When it comes to boats we all over think!
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    When it comes to boats we all over think!
    True, but one could make the argument that this entire thread is a multi-year exercise in overthinking...

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    "I should just focus on getting that task done"

    Staying on task is the only way to bring a project like this to completion.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I'm not sure what they are called, but if the concrete is quite friable, I think that's the word for crappy concrete, a little air powered chisel might be your best friend. Kind of a baby pistol sized jack hammer. Very cheap to buy from an auto parts or tool shop.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    "I should just focus on getting that task done"

    Staying on task is the only way to bring a project like this to completion.
    Yes, well some days are better than others for that. Some days you start out filled with purpose and determination, ready to tackle the big projects. Some days the work slides by so quickly that you reach dinner time without noticing that the day has passed and you can sit back and look at your progress with satisfaction. And then there are the other kind of days. The ones where the end of the project seems to recede into the distance, hampered by tools left somewhere else, a mental fog that obscures the next step or the need to address more plebeian yet pressing problems - like sealing the boat against an invasion of cats.

    What sort of day was today you may ask? No surprise there. It was the one with the cats. So I spent the day closing off all the openings with plastic rather than working on the frames. That's how it goes sometimes. Then I'm taking Skookum Maru back to Blaine this week so work on Petrel will be on hold until I get back. But in the meantime I'll leave you with this shot of Skookum Maru taken by the previous owner at Jedediah Island B.C., a place I have not been to but hope to visit soon.


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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    To me all of these things just point to the idea that you should spend your time and energy on the manner of your tag line instead of toiling in the bilge. "Life is short. Go boating now!"

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    I'm not sure what they are called, but if the concrete is quite friable, I think that's the word for crappy concrete, a little air powered chisel might be your best friend. Kind of a baby pistol sized jack hammer. Very cheap to buy from an auto parts or tool shop.

    One of those little air hammers might be about right. Not a lot of weight, can't make too great of a single impact, but enough to fracture some concrete.


    Here's an off the wall idea: A powder-actuated ramset. Blast some nails into the concrete. If its a bit fragile, you ought to be able to bust it up without imparting a lot of force on the hull. Maybe warn your neighbors first.
    There's the plan, then there's what actually happens.

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  19. #3344
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    To me all of these things just point to the idea that you should spend your time and energy on the manner of your tag line instead of toiling in the bilge. "Life is short. Go boating now!"
    I can't argue with that. And yet... I'm not ready to walk away either. People are funny. Even if we know what would ultimately make us happiest (sitting aboard a boat in a quiet cove with a cup of coffee and a good book, for instance) more often than not we do something else entirely. I'm no different.

    Quote Originally Posted by BBSebens View Post
    One of those little air hammers might be about right. Not a lot of weight, can't make too great of a single impact, but enough to fracture some concrete.


    Here's an off the wall idea: A powder-actuated ramset. Blast some nails into the concrete. If its a bit fragile, you ought to be able to bust it up without imparting a lot of force on the hull. Maybe warn your neighbors first.
    Hm. Since I have people living aboard on both sides of me that might be rude to do in the slip. As would any use of air tools. But I did do some experimental concrete removal yesterday. Aft of the big block of ballast, where it's just filling in between the frames, the concrete lifts out with little effort. So that's no problem. I think that the rest will chip out with some combination of power and hand tools, but I'm going to leave it for the haulout.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Yes, well some days are better than others for that. Some days you start out filled with purpose and determination, ready to tackle the big projects. Some days the work slides by so quickly that you reach dinner time without noticing that the day has passed and you can sit back and look at your progress with satisfaction. And then there are the other kind of days. The ones where the end of the project seems to recede into the distance, hampered by tools left somewhere else, a mental fog that obscures the next step or the need to address more plebeian yet pressing problems - like sealing the boat against an invasion of cats.

    What sort of day was today you may ask? No surprise there. It was the one with the cats. So I spent the day closing off all the openings with plastic rather than working on the frames. That's how it goes sometimes. Then I'm taking Skookum Maru back to Blaine this week so work on Petrel will be on hold until I get back. But in the meantime I'll leave you with this shot of Skookum Maru taken by the previous owner at Jedediah Island B.C., a place I have not been to but hope to visit soon.

    Wow. I don't seem to be able to stay away for the 6 months I promised. That is beautiful. But keep in mind right now is the honeymoon. That boat is going to demand plenty of maintenance, and you are going to struggle with divided loyalties. Pass Petrel on to someone who will care for her just as much as you have and give Skookum the devotion she deserves. Oh, that's gentle advice, not an instruction. I'm just not very good at indirect phrasing.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Use the force, use the force......

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    That boat is going to demand plenty of maintenance, and you are going to struggle with divided loyalties.
    Skookum Maru is pretty skookum right now. A lot of work has been done over the last few years, applying the philosophy of "this bit lasted for 60 years, let's make sure what we do lasts another 60." I wouldn't hesitate to load her up and head north tomorrow. (Chris would have to at least hesitate; he, unlike me, isn't retired yet.)

    The question won't be: Should I work on S.M. or Petrel next week?, but Should I go cruising or work on Petrel next week?

    --Paul

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Exactly, there's no question what the right answer is, go boating.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I have this exact dilemma about working on my old boat and working on my old house.
    --​Anson, M/V Kingfisher

    Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible. ~The Dalai Lama

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Use the force, use the force......
    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    Skookum Maru is pretty skookum right now. A lot of work has been done over the last few years, applying the philosophy of "this bit lasted for 60 years, let's make sure what we do lasts another 60." I wouldn't hesitate to load her up and head north tomorrow. (Chris would have to at least hesitate; he, unlike me, isn't retired yet.)

    The question won't be: Should I work on S.M. or Petrel next week?, but Should I go cruising or work on Petrel next week?

    --Paul
    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Exactly, there's no question what the right answer is, go boating.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sabre View Post
    I have this exact dilemma about working on my old boat and working on my old house.
    Paul is right. Skookum Maru is about as turn-key a boat as I am likely to find in this life. Sure she will need maintenance and she has a to-do list just like any boat, but I would have no hesitation about fueling, provisioning and heading for Alaska tomorrow. If it weren't for the need to earn a living that is! And I'll admit that the chorus advocating for more boating on Skookum Maru and less working on Petrel is persuasive. But there is no urgent need to choose between them right now. Plus what would I do with the rest of my spare time (the bits not already taken up with boating, working on boats, thinking about boating, thinking about working on boats, reading about boats, looking at pictures of boats, etc.) if I didn't have this thread to keep me occupied?

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    If you still have the energy for Petrel and it’s not breaking the bank then why not? But I would so go for functional over perfect. New frame ends, cap rail, deck, paint, windows, mast, steering, and done. Then, if you still want to carry on you can worry about the interior work. Or if you’ve had enough you have a functional boat to find a new home for instead of a project.
    -Jim

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  27. #3352
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Paul is right. Skookum Maru is about as turn-key a boat as I am likely to find in this life. Sure she will need maintenance and she has a to-do list just like any boat, but I would have no hesitation about fueling, provisioning and heading for Alaska tomorrow. If it weren't for the need to earn a living that is! And I'll admit that the chorus advocating for more boating on Skookum Maru and less working on Petrel is persuasive. But there is no urgent need to choose between them right now. Plus what would I do with the rest of my spare time (the bits not already taken up with boating, working on boats, thinking about boating, thinking about working on boats, reading about boats, looking at pictures of boats, etc.) if I didn't have this thread to keep me occupied?
    Didn't I see you have some cool old cars? And a wife and kid?

  28. #3353
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    "But there is no urgent need to choose between them right now"

    This is what we believe when we are younger. Then we discover the future holds no guarantee of a lengthy time line or ability to pass the time as we
    planned.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by jsjpd1 View Post
    If you still have the energy for Petrel and it’s not breaking the bank then why not? But I would so go for functional over perfect. New frame ends, cap rail, deck, paint, windows, mast, steering, and done. Then, if you still want to carry on you can worry about the interior work. Or if you’ve had enough you have a functional boat to find a new home for instead of a project.
    Good thoughts Jim. Too much overthinking leads to project creep. Ok. No more discussion of concrete. Frame heads and deck. Frame heads and deck.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Didn't I see you have some cool old cars? And a wife and kid?
    What? Who? Oh yeah - those. You mean the old pickup I have for hauling boat supplies and the wife and kid I have to keep me company on the boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    "But there is no urgent need to choose between them right now"

    This is what we believe when we are younger. Then we discover the future holds no guarantee of a lengthy time line or ability to pass the time as we
    planned.
    Ok Father Time. Aren't you just a ray of sunshine this morning! "Ashes to ashes...". Not saying you're wrong, but this is where I slept last night:



    Right now I'm sitting aboard Skookum Maru with my cup of coffee waiting for sunrise. It looks like it's going to be a beautiful day for a cruise up Puget Sound. So I think I'm doing ok living in the moment just now. But also, true. What I should have said is that the work on Petrel is something I can do as time permits. If I find that time does not permit, or that Petrel is suffering from neglect, then I can take the necessary steps but that's a question for the future. If, as navydog points out, I have a future that is. We live in hope.

  30. #3355
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    Default

    Oh boy you're having Sunrise Coffee?
    what about that third wooden plug 4" above the waterline on the 5th frame?

    😇

    I'm glad most of the concrete is just lifting out, Chris
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  31. #3356
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Sorry if I was to pragmatic, just thought that you had already reached that conclusion, "Life is short". I guess I've had an abundant supply of evidence pushing some of my own decisions, like buying boats and ridding myself of projects. I'm about 10 years ahead of you on the curve and seeing lots of plans gone the wrong way. Live life to It's fullest and share it!

  32. #3357
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Right now I'm sitting aboard Skookum Maru with my cup of coffee waiting for sunrise. It looks like it's going to be a beautiful day for a cruise up Puget Sound. So I think I'm doing ok living in the moment just now.
    Live well, Chris. It sounds like you've got that pretty well in hand, just don't let it creep away. As we have discussed elsewhere, life can blindside you from the damnedest directions.

    I can't tell you how glad I am that you have SM. After all your enthusiasm and encouragement in my own search for a liveaboard a year ago, it seems only right that you have such a good boat, so fitting for what you want to do.

    Alex

  33. #3358
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    How far did you get on your cruise up Puget Sound before you discovered the locks are closed today and tomorrow?

  34. #3359
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Had a nice run yesterday. Up Puget Sound and Saratoga Passage...



    ...to the Swinomish Channel.



    Then past La Conner.



    Out through Padilla Bay (very shallow - know your marks!)



    At that point my plan was to stop in Bellingham for the night but it was such a nice day that I just kept going, past Vendovi and Lummi islands...



    ...and into the Strait of Georgia heading for Birch Point and Blaine.



    Got to Blaine around 2030. Quite dark by then but I know the channel well enough now. Trickiest part was avoiding crab trap buoys on the way in. About 13 hours straight through but given the perfect weather and flat water it was easy enough. Lots of time to think though.


    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Oh boy you're having Sunrise Coffee?
    what about that third wooden plug 4" above the waterline on the 5th frame?

    I'm glad most of the concrete is just lifting out, Chris
    Plug? Frame? Concrete? What? Those things all seem so much less important after a day like yesterday!

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Sorry if I was to pragmatic, just thought that you had already reached that conclusion, "Life is short". I guess I've had an abundant supply of evidence pushing some of my own decisions, like buying boats and ridding myself of projects. I'm about 10 years ahead of you on the curve and seeing lots of plans gone the wrong way. Live life to It's fullest and share it!
    Navydog, you are not wrong and you called it exactly. "Go boating now" is in my signature for exactly the reason you point out - that it's easy to get caught up in all the distractions of daily life - including working on boats - and forget to do the thing you actually enjoy. "Someday I'll go boating when the house is painted and the lawn is mowed and the aft deck on Petrel is built" just doesn't seem like the path to happiness does it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pitsligo View Post
    Live well, Chris. It sounds like you've got that pretty well in hand, just don't let it creep away. As we have discussed elsewhere, life can blindside you from the damnedest directions.

    I can't tell you how glad I am that you have SM. After all your enthusiasm and encouragement in my own search for a liveaboard a year ago, it seems only right that you have such a good boat, so fitting for what you want to do.

    Alex
    Thanks Alex! I hope you have found an arrangement that you are happy with as well, or at least a start down that road. Too bad Nesika didn't work out.

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    How far did you get on your cruise up Puget Sound before you discovered the locks are closed today and tomorrow?
    Well funny about that. I actually knew about the lock closure in advance but I had originally planned on heading out this coming weekend, after they reopen, so I promptly forgot all about it. So it was pure luck that we made it out before they closed when I changed the plan to leave earlier.

    Anyway, back to Petrel. I do know that the practical thing to do would be to find a new home for her sooner than later, and that any time spent on her is time not spent on Skookum Maru. But that just doesn't feel right to me. Maybe it's that I love a good story arc and this one does not seem to be done yet. My life has been defined by boats for four decades now, starting with St. Brendan, the boat I lived aboard when I was a boy. Savona, the Monk I owned and lived aboard in the '90s, led me to Perihelion, the Huckins I tried and failed to restore over a period of fifteen years. Perihelion led me to Petrel when I found her on the hard in South Park waiting to be scrapped the day I made the decision to have Perihelion cut up. And Petrel led me to Skookum Maru since it was this thread that prompted Paul to contact me about buying her her last year. Skookum Maru is a new chapter but I don't think I have brought the story of Petrel to a fitting conclusion yet. At the very least I need to finish some of the projects I have started. I may pass her on to a new caretaker at some point but I would like her to be in a functional state with a chance of surviving for another sixty years when that happens.

    So. Finish just the frame repairs that need to be done before the new deck goes in. Don't worry about the concrete (at least not the parts I can't tackle easily and in the water). That's a bridge to be crossed when and if. Get the steering working again. Build the aft deck. When those projects are done I'll think about what comes next.

  35. #3360
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    but I don't think I have brought the story of Petrel to a fitting conclusion yet. At the very least I need to finish some of the projects I have started. I may pass her on to a new caretaker at some point but I would like her to be in a functional state with a chance of surviving for another sixty years when that happens.
    And there you go. I think that 1) this is the best thing for Petrel & 2) it sounds like the best thing for you. All it'll take is balancing Petrel work with time on the new boat - and wife, kids, vehicles, work - yaknow, that less important stuff
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

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