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Thread: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

  1. #4201
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Chris it’s funny you should mention sewing machines because I broke out an old Singer 500A I inherited to learn to sew so I can make window covers/cushions for my boat.

    So far I’ve figured out how to load a bobbin.

  2. #4202
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    Chris you are a genius! You had me in stitches, tears from laughing running down my cheeks and my belly aching, how could possibly someone try to do the "proper thing" the way I get caught out all the time and then explain it to us in such a gentle, humorous and lovely way? Awesome, well done, congrats !!!!
    Thanks Dody I'm not sure I even know what the proper thing is most of the time. I'm just muddling through life, trying not to break too many things on the way. But I'm glad that you are enjoying the story!

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post
    Chris it’s funny you should mention sewing machines because I broke out an old Singer 500A I inherited to learn to sew so I can make window covers/cushions for my boat.

    So far I’ve figured out how to load a bobbin.
    Well you are ahead of me then. I only just found out that the type of thread (wound on a cone rather than a spool) that I bought to sew the webbing needs to be fed from a separate stand, not from the pin on the top of the machine. So I'm at a standstill at the moment. Fortunately there are two fabric and sewing stores within half a mile of my office so I should be able to get everything I need tomorrow.
    Last edited by cstevens; 01-06-2020 at 06:26 PM.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  3. #4203
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Back to band saws for a moment, this is what I get for looking at craigslist first thing in the morning...



    https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/t...050683377.html

    Not that I would ever have a need for a saw that large but what a neat piece of old machinery! Hopefully it will end up with someone who will put it to good use.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  4. #4204
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Chris, big band saws are amazing years ago when I volunteered at the seaport museum workshop I was resawing 12-14 in Ash paddle blanks like it was cedar, on the (something like)10 ft by 40 inch wheel ship saw they have,
    Denise, Bristol PA, retired from HVAC business, & boat restoration and building

  5. #4205
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    I only just found out that the type of thread (wound on a cone rather than a spool) that I bought to sew the webbing needs to be fed from a separate stand, not from the pin on the top of the machine. So I'm at a standstill at the moment. Fortunately there are two fabric and sewing stores within half a mile of my office so I should be able to get everything I need tomorrow.
    Chris now you do realize that the "separate stand" is just a piece of thick wire bend to shape and that geometry is not important. The spool just needs to stand higher and more to the right behind the machine. Then you take the thread and wind it once around the post.

    Edit: Dody is right, not the spool but the thread needs to come from higher up .
    Last edited by Rumars; 01-06-2020 at 06:22 PM.

  6. #4206
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Rumars View Post
    Chris now you do realize that the "separate stand" is just a piece of thick wire bend to shape and that geometry is not important. The spool just needs to stand higher and more to the right behind the machine. Then you take the thread and wind it once around the post.
    Not quite. The spool needs to stand flat on a surface and the thread needs to be pulled upwards from above the center of the spool and from there to the hole in the pin on top of the machine. There are proper holders one can buy, but a clotheshanger is a good start to build one yourself - although, I have to admit, I have never been very successful with making them from clotheshangers myself.
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I looked at your photo again, the spool does not belong on that post, but on the one to the right. Your machine either misses it, or it is telescoping. Anyway I found you a picture of the original conic spool holder. I have faith you can replicate it.

    133-spulenständer.jpg

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Rumars View Post
    Chris now you do realize that the "separate stand" is just a piece of thick wire bend to shape and that geometry is not important. The spool just needs to stand higher and more to the right behind the machine. Then you take the thread and wind it once around the post.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    Not quite. The spool needs to stand flat on a surface and the thread needs to be pulled upwards from above the center of the spool and from there to the hole in the pin on top of the machine. There are proper holders one can buy, but a clotheshanger is a good start to build one yourself - although, I have to admit, I have never been very successful with making them from clotheshangers myself.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rumars View Post
    I looked at your photo again, the spool does not belong on that post, but on the one to the right. Your machine either misses it, or it is telescoping. Anyway I found you a picture of the original conic spool holder. I have faith you can replicate it.

    133-spulenständer.jpg
    Thanks Rumars and Dody. I had not thought of simply making something to hold the thread at the proper angle although I did see on the Sailrite site a method of placing the spool on the floor which would work if nothing else was available. But a suitable holder was only a few dollars so I went ahead and picked one up. Once I have an hour or two free I'll continue setting up the sewing machine and then I'm sure I will have many more questions.

    Rumars that original Pfaff holder is quite a piece of sculpture. I am definitely *not* going over to eBay right now to look for one...

    (And my apologies Dody, I see that I thought you were Denise when I responded earlier. I've fixed it!)
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Whaaaat?
    Cast iron ... gold letters ... vintage...

    I hope you got the pink plastic one at the store.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I made the fairlead you’re describing for my machine out of a scrap piece of wire, I had to set the edge of the machine on it to keep it upright...worked well though.

  11. #4211
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"







    Back to the bandsaw!

    The guides are ball bearings on my saw, but notice how offset it looks between them. I think you're well on the way to getting the old Delta dialed in.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post






    Back to the bandsaw!

    The guides are ball bearings on my saw, but notice how offset it looks between them. I think you're well on the way to getting the old Delta dialed in.
    Your guides should be drilled off-centered, and if turned, should bring them closer together allowing to almost touch your blade.

    WgMkr

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I will check that today...I know we followed the instructions for the initial setup adjustments but I'm not sure about the guides. There are a surprising number of adjustments on these things (as Chris knows!).

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post
    I will check that today...I know we followed the instructions for the initial setup adjustments but I'm not sure about the guides. There are a surprising number of adjustments on these things (as Chris knows!).
    It does look like the roller guides are on eccentric adjusters and they could be closer to the blade. One question though - what is that tube and nozzle in the photo? Air to blow away sawdust? Or to cool the blade for metal cutting?
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  15. #4215
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Looks like the thrust bearing was drilled 90 degrees so it rolls against the back of the blade which is pretty cool and bet you could do that with yours Chris although it looks like you got it okay the way it is
    Denise, Bristol PA, retired from HVAC business, & boat restoration and building

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Looks like the thrust bearing was drilled 90 degrees so it rolls against the back of the blade which is pretty cool and bet you could do that with yours Chris although it looks like you got it okay the way it is
    Yes, there are aftermarket guide upgrades that work that way (the Carter kit is one example) but I'm going to try and get it working before deciding whether it's worth spending that sort of money on this saw.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I keep thinking I should do something today but the best answer is, I'll wait until tomorrow..


    Chris just a thought you don't have to put the motor down under as it was. As I mentioned before, a simple Stout board with a hinge works wonderfully as a counterweighted motor mount which can be easily mounted to the back of the band saw base, it certainly would get less dust.
    Denise, Bristol PA, retired from HVAC business, & boat restoration and building

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    I keep thinking I should do something today but the best answer is, I'll wait until tomorrow..


    Chris just a thought you don't have to put the motor down under as it was. As I mentioned before, a simple Stout board with a hinge works wonderfully as a counterweighted motor mount which can be easily mounted to the back of the band saw base, it certainly would get less dust.
    Never do today what you can do tomorrow, never do tomorrow what you can put off indefinitely.

    I was going to join the procrastinator's Association, but I never got around to it.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  19. #4219
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I actually did something productive yesterday, connected the 4 inch PVC outside air intake to the new boiler now I can't hear the thing running lol
    Denise, Bristol PA, retired from HVAC business, & boat restoration and building

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Chris - yes, they are on eccentrics and I adjusted them again...but the left one is just missing the blade when it is adjusted all the way away, if that makes sense. It seems to work though...yes there is a little fan driven off the lower wheel that blows the chips away from the blade. Pretty skoomum! It also has a little brush that cleans chips off the lower tire...a toothbrush would work.

    Denise - Nice work!

  21. #4221
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    A red letter day in the shop today, with actual progress on TWO projects! First the new pulleys for the bandsaw arrived today. So after dinner I headed down to the shop to see how they would work:



    Much better. I still need to remount and rewire the motor and adjust the belt tension but the belt no longer interferes with the engagement lever for the reduction gear. And then the thread holder for the sewing machine arrived as well, so I had to try it out.



    Not nearly as fancy as the vintage Pfaff holder that Rumars posted but the base *is* cast iron at least. And with everything set up I had no excuse not to try sewing something:



    Difficult to see green thread on green webbing but that Box X stitch is my first-ever actual sewing attempt. I'm pretty pleased with it. Now I just need to do that a few more times to make a bridle for the rowing shell. In the meantime critiques, advice, and suggestions are very much welcome.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  22. #4222
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Success!
    Chris who makes that wheel setup you have under the band saw?
    Denise, Bristol PA, retired from HVAC business, & boat restoration and building

  23. #4223
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    It's this one Denise:

    https://www.amazon.com/Portamate-PM-.../dp/B06W5JJ2QN

    It's... ok. Maybe a bit marginal for something as heavy as this bandsaw although it's rated for 400 pounds. The biggest problem is that the plywood base flexes too much. I may trim the base down a bit so it will fit more closely to the legs of the stand. And it would probably help to fasten the stand to the base as well. But for now it does the job.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Congrats Chris, so awesome to see progress and very neat your box x stitch (can't see the stitches on the sides connecting the outer corners of the x'es, but that's the photo I guess)! Now you only need to keep going
    fair winds, Dody
    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain
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  25. #4225
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    QUOTE=cstevens;6064161]A red letter day in the shop today, with actual progress on TWO projects! First the new pulleys for the bandsaw arrived today. So after dinner I headed down to the shop to see how they would work:



    Much better. I still need to remount and rewire the motor and adjust the belt tension but the belt no longer interferes with the engagement lever for the reduction gear. And then the thread holder for the sewing machine arrived as well, so I had to try it out.



    Not nearly as fancy as the vintage Pfaff holder that Rumars posted but the base *is* cast iron at least. And with everything set up I had no excuse not to try sewing something:



    Difficult to see green thread on green webbing but that Box X stitch is my first-ever actual sewing attempt. I'm pretty pleased with it. Now I just need to do that a few more times to make a bridle for the rowing shell. In the meantime critiques, advice, and suggestions are very much welcome.[/QUOTE]


    Be very careful to NEVER get any oil on the main belt ( the inside one with the metal staple thingys) of the 130. It is rayon ( pretty sure) , not nylon . Oil damages it , and it’s a big pita job to replace !

  26. #4226
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    QUOTE=cstevens;6064161]
    Be very careful to NEVER get any oil on the main belt ( the inside one with the metal staple thingys) of the 130. It is rayon ( pretty sure) , not nylon . Oil damages it , and it’s a big pita job to replace !
    Thanks Bruce. I have seen a couple of posts about oil and the timing belt. I checked it last night for that very reason and it's definitely a bit oily. I don't know if there is anything I can do about that at this point except hope it lasts as long as possible and then find a replacement if or when it fails. I do see that there is one source for remanufactured belts on eBay. Not cheap but I guess better than nothing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    Congrats Chris, so awesome to see progress and very neat your box x stitch (can't see the stitches on the sides connecting the outer corners of the x'es, but that's the photo I guess)! Now you only need to keep going
    Thanks Dody Yes, the stitching on sides of the box just isn't showing up in the photo. It's there! Not going to win any awards and but I'm confident that it will hold for the purpose. And I'm sure I will improve with practice.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  27. #4227
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    E73070D6-D096-4955-B66E-30FF02700409.jpeg3B241EFB-AE50-453D-8351-A4ABF49CEFCC.jpg36387A62-332F-44A2-A058-428A6811C00B.jpegI’ve missed a lot of content here and have lots of associative responses:
    band saw: I bought a used, almost new 14” delta bandsaw 45 years ago. I rushed down to Star Machinery and bought a step block set with the guide extension and longer blade guards. I also bought a factory fence and the longest fence rails offered. I only used the fence a few times before permanently removing it. I prefer a rounded point fence for ripping with a sharp low teeth count blade. A blade which is dull on one side will “lead” even with a fence. My step block was square and parallel or I would have put it in my milling machine and trued it. My saw was one of the early round guide rod, but it still had the hex on the blade guide mount but not in the upper arm. There was, what I consider excess slop in the machining of the casting through which the guide slides and is clamped. My saw was a new made in USA tool. With the stepblock installed, the travel of the upper blade guides varied at the extremes of the rod travel. When doing lots of cutting in 9-12” stock I would adjust the blades guides for this position, then readjust the guides for sawing thinner material. I like using micarta guide blocks for the side guides.

    Sewing machines: I bring a hand cranked Pfaff 130 whenever I travel, whether by boat or Sprinter. It will sew whatever I can fit under the presser foot. I wished that I had known that you were looking for one. I have a few more. I also have a large industrial walking foot machine if you want sew a boat cover etc. Your Pfaff is missing the spool holder I use the most. We could get together an make one some time. It allows the on machine use of small spools and acts as a intermediate guile when using large cones with a “tree”. Do you have the metal box with additional attachments? I have a Pfaff 130 service manual I can send you.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Psuggmog; 01-12-2020 at 03:02 AM.

  28. #4228
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Be careful when sewing through think materials (especially webbing or where there is already stitching hole) with these lighter weight machines. They are the ones which bite!
    I'm a sailmaker by trade and the only time I've had a needle snap and hit me in the eye (I've had plenty snap) was with a lighter weight machine sewing through webbing. It was the usual story of trying to finish a job quickly before the end of the day and rushing instead of taking my time and being careful as I was pushing the machine a bit past it's limits, big lesson learnt....

    You only think about wearing safety glasses when you are using big machine but it's usually the smaller ones which get you.
    If you take your time and go slowly even turning the machine over you had to "feel" the pressure in the needle it can save you a lot of issues.

    I bought a singer 201P ( pretty similar to your one above) to do the upholstery in my H28 and it all came up a treat.
    It really pays not to skimp on zips and webbing. Generally these break down before the fabric does. Stay away from polypropylene webbing (which I think is what you have used above) if it's going to see a lot of sun as it breaks down quite quick. I use seatbelt webbing instead on all my canvas work.
    Good Luck and thanks for the great threads!

  29. #4229
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    End of a busy week! Just catching up on the thread a bit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Psuggmog View Post
    I’ve missed a lot of content here and have lots of associative responses:
    band saw: I bought a used, almost new 14” delta bandsaw 45 years ago. I rushed down to Star Machinery and bought a step block set with the guide extension and longer blade guards. I also bought a factory fence and the longest fence rails offered. I only used the fence a few times before permanently removing it. I prefer a rounded point fence for ripping with a sharp low teeth count blade. A blade which is dull on one side will “lead” even with a fence. My step block was square and parallel or I would have put it in my milling machine and trued it. My saw was one of the early round guide rod, but it still had the hex on the blade guide mount but not in the upper arm. There was, what I consider excess slop in the machining of the casting through which the guide slides and is clamped. My saw was a new made in USA tool. With the stepblock installed, the travel of the upper blade guides varied at the extremes of the rod travel. When doing lots of cutting in 9-12” stock I would adjust the blades guides for this position, then readjust the guides for sawing thinner material. I like using micarta guide blocks for the side guides.

    Sewing machines: I bring a hand cranked Pfaff 130 whenever I travel, whether by boat or Sprinter. It will sew whatever I can fit under the presser foot. I wished that I had known that you were looking for one. I have a few more. I also have a large industrial walking foot machine if you want sew a boat cover etc. Your Pfaff is missing the spool holder I use the most. We could get together an make one some time. It allows the on machine use of small spools and acts as a intermediate guile when using large cones with a “tree”. Do you have the metal box with additional attachments? I have a Pfaff 130 service manual I can send you.
    Thanks Psuggmog. "Excess slop" appears to be a feature of the Delta bandsaw. I'm learning how to work around it. As for the Pfaff, I'm not sure I was really looking for a sewing machine at all. More of an impulse purchase. I'm having fun with it though! I don't have the metal box and only a few attachments came with it. I'm sure it's missing a few things but the important bits seem to be there at least. I figure it will be good to learn on and if I end up needing any of the missing parts I can cross that bridge when.

    Quote Originally Posted by James Chilman View Post
    Be careful when sewing through think materials (especially webbing or where there is already stitching hole) with these lighter weight machines. They are the ones which bite!
    I'm a sailmaker by trade and the only time I've had a needle snap and hit me in the eye (I've had plenty snap) was with a lighter weight machine sewing through webbing. It was the usual story of trying to finish a job quickly before the end of the day and rushing instead of taking my time and being careful as I was pushing the machine a bit past it's limits, big lesson learnt....

    You only think about wearing safety glasses when you are using big machine but it's usually the smaller ones which get you.
    If you take your time and go slowly even turning the machine over you had to "feel" the pressure in the needle it can save you a lot of issues.

    I bought a singer 201P ( pretty similar to your one above) to do the upholstery in my H28 and it all came up a treat.
    It really pays not to skimp on zips and webbing. Generally these break down before the fabric does. Stay away from polypropylene webbing (which I think is what you have used above) if it's going to see a lot of sun as it breaks down quite quick. I use seatbelt webbing instead on all my canvas work.
    Good Luck and thanks for the great threads!
    Good advice James - thanks. I'm still feeling my way with the whole sewing thing so any info is good right now. I had no idea that snapping needles was something to look out for! And your comments on the webbing are interesting. I do think it's polypropylene and it was specifically recommended for outdoor/marine use by the salesperson at the shop that sold it to me. I doubt it will see much sun though so I'm not too concerned. Actually I'm not sure I will follow through on my original plan for it at all as I have not been able to come up with a design that I like for the bridle I was envisioning. I would rather not drill holes in the deck of my rowing shell and I don't see any other way to do it.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    In terms of sewing it's worth mentioning that the north loft above fisheries supply is usually willing to take on odd jobs at pretty reasonable prices. In the interest of full disclosure, I used to work there.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Pelirrojo View Post
    In terms of sewing it's worth mentioning that the north loft above fisheries supply is usually willing to take on odd jobs at pretty reasonable prices. In the interest of full disclosure, I used to work there.
    Thanks Pelirrojo. That's good to know!

    Spent the day taking care of a few chores on Petrel in preparation for the move to Blaine. Which is now scheduled for next weekend, weather dependent. Fastened down my increasingly-permanent-looking temporary aft deck, checked engine fluids and squared away the cabin. Then took advantage of a break in the rain for a little shakedown cruise in company with Graywin.





    Out through Portage Bay and the Montlake Cut.



    And north along the shore of Lake Washington, where we were greeted with blue sky and a rainbow!



    All was not entirely sunshine and rainbows however...



    ...as I obviously need to tighten the packing in my rudder shaft stuffing box. Still that's not a difficult problem to solve. I can tackle it this week before we head out.

    After a few hours on the water we were safely back in the slip.



    Petrel did mostly great. At four hours on the water this was the longest voyage we have taken in the five years we have been together. A good hour longer than the run to Gig Harbor. And aside from the leaking stuffing box the cruise was uneventful right up to the point where we entered the marina on the way home. On bringing the up-to-now utterly reliable 3-53 back to idle it stalled completely. Not good! But it started right up again on the button and seemed to run fine as long as I kept the throttle just off the idle stop. We made it into the slip without further incident but now I'm a little concerned about the motor. It didn't seem to be running quite as smoothly as it should when I shut it down. I'm hoping it's something simple though, like I just need to replace the fuel filters. Fingers crossed!
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  32. #4232
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    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    2,055

    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Yep, sounds like a fuel restriction, Chris.

  33. #4233
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    45,623

    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    How old is the fuel Chris? More than a few years I'd think about replacing it. Also - check the filters carefully - maybe there's sludge/slime/mold in the tank(s)? At the very least, bring some extra fuel filters with you on your trip.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  34. #4234
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,691

    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Aquinian View Post
    Yep, sounds like a fuel restriction, Chris.
    Yes, that's what I'm hoping!

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    How old is the fuel Chris? More than a few years I'd think about replacing it. Also - check the filters carefully - maybe there's sludge/slime/mold in the tank(s)? At the very least, bring some extra fuel filters with you on your trip.
    Oh, it's older than time Garret. Some of it is probably still left over from the previous owner, so at least six years old, maybe more. It should definitely be replaced. And there may be slime in the tank as well. There are maybe fifteen hours total on the filter in there now, which is nothing. If it's clogged then the tank is definitely suspect. I have been avoiding that chore since the engine has been running fine but I may have to give in and deal with it before we head to Blaine.
    - Chris

    Any single boat project will always expand to encompass the set of all possible boat projects.

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  35. #4235
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    se pa (Bristol PA)
    Posts
    4,674

    Default

    Chris As soon as a boat starts moving the diesel starts sloshing in the tank and stirs up the crud which quickly clogs it filters Chris,. when we replaced my metal tank with a plastic tank that was semi-transparent you could actually see how much the fuel sloshed around even larger tanks with baffles slosh, Something fuel oil truck drivers need to be very aware of too
    Denise, Bristol PA, retired from HVAC business, & boat restoration and building

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