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Thread: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

  1. #2801
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Snow Pea View Post
    Very tidy and professional work Chris, glad its worked well for you. Shame about the blown seal, reminds me of a certain penguin joke..

    Not much support for the top of that rudder stock, but it lasted this long so I wouldn't be too bothered.
    Thanks Snow Pea. Blown seal, penguin... I think I've heard that one

    Quote Originally Posted by Sabre View Post
    Yeah, the wheel on Kingfisher (a retired crabber/fishing boat from BC) is 4.25 turns lock to lock. She has the main helm in the pilothouse, of course, and a secondary helm back in the cockpit, a leftover from her commercial fishing days. She's my first boat with wheel steering (other than small runabouts), and my first with hydraulic steering. I knew that the rear helm pump had a slow leak, but it was just a wee tiny bit, so....

    SabreWife and I were out for a recent evening cruise, coming back just after dark, and I suddenly found that we had no steering. *INSERT PUCKER FACTOR EMOTICON* Thinking about it later, the steering had been somewhat mushy and vague, with "bumps" as the wheel was rotated. Not having experience with hydraulic steering, I just noted it and moved along...and forgot to check the oil level at the main helm. *FOREHEAD SMACK EMOTICON GOES HERE* Those "bumps" I had felt were the main helm pump gulping air into the system.

    Happily, the rear helm is at a lower level, and so had plenty of hydraulic fluid and good helm authority back there. Of course, there is NO forward visibility from the rear helm, and NO visibility to port, so the somewhat stressed-out wifey was my lookout on the port side of the cockpit and we entered the harbor doing S-turns, like a tailwheel aircraft does when taxiing. We backed down the fairway to our slip and THANK YOU wind god, Aeolus, for stilling the usual prevailing breeze that wants to blow us into the neighbor.

    I got a new seal kit for the ancient Wagner AW helm pump thanks to some friendly folks up in Richmond, BC and topped off the system at the upper helm. Like you, all my hydraulic braking system experience screamed at me to bleed the air out, but, sure enough, many lock-to-lock turns of the wheel took care of it.

    I follow along with great interest...Petrel is a beautiful boat and I'm delighted that there are folks who want to keep such lovely things alive. I agree with an improvised deck to allow you to get out on the saltchuck!

    Sabre, that's a bad day that could have gone so, so much worse! I'm glad you were able to make it back to the slip safely. In retrospect I think the signs were there with Petrel as well. The helm was never as crisp as with other hydraulic installations I've experienced. It's a good reminder that things which don't seem quite right are always worth investigating before they become emergencies.

  2. #2802
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    It's a good reminder that things which don't seem quite right are always worth investigating before they become emergencies.
    Well said Chris, I agree with all my heart!!!
    fair winds, Dody

    "They did not know it was impossible so they did it" - Mark Twain

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  3. #2803
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Dody View Post
    Chris, I just had a chat with a hydraulic-guy, there is some news !!!

    None of the big cranes etc. have bleed-valves, and this although the ram usually is much higher up than the pump itself. They are all self-bleeding. Now, the theory behind it as he explained to me is, that the hydraulic fluid is much denser than air. The seals at the outer ends are strong enough to keep the fluid in the system, but the air is capable to escape the moment the piston inside the ram is pushed against the seal. Which means that the air can escape and doesn't have to travel all the way back to the reservoir.
    Dody, I am pretty confident that any working hydraulic seal will hold air also. We use air to push the fluid out of cylinders after testing them, and the pressure gets pretty high. If they leaked air past the gland, we’d open them up and re-seal them again.

    Brakes are single acting, and very short stroke. The air won’t migrate up that long skinny pipe easily. Double acting cylinders will self bleed, I think because there’s so much stroke, and so much forced movement.

    Your crane guy is exactly right that the height differential is irrelevant. Think of the fluid, after bleeding, as a solid, moving back and forth. That’s effectively what it is, being non-compressible.

    Regards,
    John.

  4. #2804
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    On to the aft deck. Worked on removing the last of the original deck today.







    So that's done then. Next step is to bodge up something that will do until I can finish the frame repairs and build something permanent. I was feeling pretty good about things right then. Sure, I need to sort out the steering cylinder but that's not too tough. Starting on the deck project seemed like a good place to wrap things up for the day.

    But before we left the boat, one last thing. Dash wanted to "test the engine". Sure - not a bad idea I thought. I've been starting it every few weeks anyway. So we did. It started on the button as always and settled down to a steady idle. We let it warm up for a bit and then Dash bent down to look in to the engine compartment.

    "What are you looking for" I asked? "I want to see if it's leaking oil" he replied. I chuckled a bit. "No kiddo, it's not leaking. I fixed all of that." And just as I formed those words in my mind, before I could stop myself from uttering them and sending them out into the universe, the motor started making an awful hissing, spitting, gurgling noise. I leaped for the shutoff cable, pulled it, and killed the engine - leaving silence but for a quiet dripping noise.

    I went down below and poked my head into the engine compartment. Sure enough, the oil filter housing was leaking again, and had dumped a good quart of oil into the bilge. Now I love this boat. I really do. Most of the time. But not right at that moment. No, at that moment I was irked. Peeved. Quite possibly p****d off. I'm not given to swearing at all, and most definitely not in front of Dash, but if he had not been there I might have indulged in a few choice words.

    Not Petrel's fault of course. She can't help how she was maintained (or not) for the last few decades. Obviously the filter housing was just too pitted from rust to seal well even after I cleaned it up. Really I should have ditched the old cartridge filter last year and replaced it with a spin-on setup, which I've been meaning to do. And I have to acknowledge that this was the best possible scenario - finding the problem in the slip where I can deal with it with no urgency rather than underway and in a much worse position.

    Still, tomorrow I will be cleaning up the bilge with oil pads rather than working on the aft deck. Not my best day ever.
    Last edited by cstevens; 07-07-2018 at 08:06 PM.

  5. #2805
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    Thats a shame, sometimes it feels like 1 step forward and two backward...

    She looks good as an open boat! Just another thought. What about just keeping the boat open over summer, put in some nice solid floors and floorboard, and a few strategic beams. Then focus on a decent hardtop and side flaps to keep the water out. Dash must be five now? My wee fella has also just turned five. Not a bad age for boat work. At least they sometimes listen...
    Last edited by Snow Pea; 07-07-2018 at 08:29 PM.

  6. #2806
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Thanks Snow Pea. Blown seal, penguin... I think I've heard that one




    Sabre, that's a bad day that could have gone so, so much worse! I'm glad you were able to make it back to the slip safely. In retrospect I think the signs were there with Petrel as well. The helm was never as crisp as with other hydraulic installations I've experienced. It's a good reminder that things which don't seem quite right are always worth investigating before they become emergencies.
    This reminds me of a saying we have at work...if you say "Gee that's weird..." it isn't weird...something is wrong!

  7. #2807
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    That sucks Chris, but I’m sure you’ll get it sorted in no time. Looks like you could just run a ladder from the fish hold to the wheel house and be good to go. Too bad I don’t live a little closer. I’d gladly come help out on the reframe and redecking.
    -Jim

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    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

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  8. #2808
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Yeah. Never say never... However, right now is way, way better than 100 miles from home in a deserted anchorage!

    On a Chris Craft I changed the canister filter to a spin-on. What was a 1.5 hour job became 20 minutes.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  9. #2809
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    cat litter soaks it up in short order Chris! Oil in the the wood... dunno about that. But don't beat up yourself too bad. it's a very common occurrence, new and old boats.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  10. #2810
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Snow Pea View Post
    Thats a shame, sometimes it feels like 1 step forward and two backward...

    She looks good as an open boat! Just another thought. What about just keeping the boat open over summer, put in some nice solid floors and floorboard, and a few strategic beams. Then focus on a decent hardtop and side flaps to keep the water out. Dash must be five now? My wee fella has also just turned five. Not a bad age for boat work. At least they sometimes listen...
    Yep - he turned 5 in March. He's getting pretty helpful. Main problem is that he never wants to sit still and sometimes you just have to take a minute and think about things! And yes, right now the plan for Petrel is to keep her as an open picnic boat and occasional overnighter. After toying with all of the different options for making her into a family cruiser last year I took a hard look at how much work that would take and decided that it wasn't realistic. So we will have to find another way to go on longer cruises.

    Quote Originally Posted by Powerwagon View Post
    This reminds me of a saying we have at work...if you say "Gee that's weird..." it isn't weird...something is wrong!
    That's for sure. I've learned that lesson over and over.

    Quote Originally Posted by jsjpd1 View Post
    That sucks Chris, but I’m sure you’ll get it sorted in no time. Looks like you could just run a ladder from the fish hold to the wheel house and be good to go. Too bad I don’t live a little closer. I’d gladly come help out on the reframe and redecking.
    If only! But yeah, this is just a minor bump in the road. Tory and Dash are heading out of town in a few days and I will have an entire week to myself. I'm hoping to make a bunch of progress then.

    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    Yeah. Never say never... However, right now is way, way better than 100 miles from home in a deserted anchorage!

    On a Chris Craft I changed the canister filter to a spin-on. What was a 1.5 hour job became 20 minutes.
    Yes, exactly. I got off easy on this one. Which I will tell myself as I'm cleaning it up. Could have been so much worse. Spin on filter is the way to go for sure though. That's top of my list right now.

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    cat litter soaks it up in short order Chris! Oil in the the wood... dunno about that. But don't beat up yourself too bad. it's a very common occurrence, new and old boats.
    Well Denise, 50 years with a Detroit Diesel has put so much oil into the bilge of Petrel that one more quart won't make the slightest difference. You should have seen how much oil came out when I steam cleaned the bilge as part of my initial cleanup. I put 100 gallons of dirty water into drums and it looked like it was half oil.

  11. #2811
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Is there any way you can put a tray under the engine? Or at least one under the oil filter area? Makes cleanup a whole lot easier.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  12. #2812
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Well, there sort of is one already since the concrete ballast creates a flat pan under the motor. But it’s interrupted by floor timbers so it would be difficult to put a continuous tray down. And the ballast is angled so it drains aft with limber holes at the floors, so the oil ended up draining to the shaft alley. It would have gone to the sump for the bilge pump but I stuffed a bunch of oil pads down there to keep it from going any further. Luckily Petrel has not been leaking at all - she’s bone dry - so it’s just a matter of soaking up the oil.

  13. #2813
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Spent the morning stuffing oil pads into every crevice of the bilge. Not much more I can do there for the momebt other than let them do their work and then repeat until all of the liquid oil is gone. So in the meantime I decided to have a look at cleaning up the pilot house/engine room aft bulkhead in preparation for building a new aft deck.



    First problem: Turns out that I ran these hard lines for the steering right where I want the new deck to land. I wasn't planning on changing the deck height when I installed them but now they are in the way. So out they come.



    So glad I just spent all that time hooking up the steering again!

    Next, the old deck beam needs to come off.



    A bit of work with a mallet and chisel took care of that:



    Next up, design ideas for a temporary deck.

  14. #2814
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    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Spent the morning stuffing oil pads into every crevice of the bilge. Not much more I can do there for the momebt other than let them do their work and then repeat until all of the liquid oil is gone. So in the meantime I decided to have a look at cleaning up the pilot house/engine room aft bulkhead in preparation for building a new aft deck.



    First problem: Turns out that I ran these hard lines for the steering right where I want the new deck to land. I wasn't planning on changing the deck height when I installed them but now they are in the way. So out they come.



    So glad I just spent all that time hooking up the steering again!

    Next, the old deck beam needs to come off.



    A bit of work with a mallet and chisel took care of that:



    Next up, design ideas for a temporary deck.
    Find a old boat that's being cut up and has teak decks! Then cut it up and make teak deck tiles 12 x 12, 18 by 18, 24 by 24.... Inches
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    ^^ Teak parquet?

    I was thinking much more temporary than that. Dimensional-lumber-and-fir-plywood temporary.

  16. #2816
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    Well you can't say I don't think creatively LOL plywood works too!
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  17. #2817
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    ^^ Teak parquet?

    I was thinking much more temporary than that. Dimensional-lumber-and-fir-plywood temporary.
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.


    Better make it a nice one.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  18. #2818
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Well you can't say I don't think creatively LOL plywood works too!
    Nope - I'd never say that!

    Quote Originally Posted by jsjpd1 View Post
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.


    Better make it a nice one.
    Yes. True. And there's my dilemma. If I'm going to spend the time to make a "nice" temporary deck why not just spend a little more time and do it right? I will confess that yesterday's oil leak fiasco is making me rethink things a bit. My goal all along has been to keep Petrel operational while I tackle all of the repairs. I wrote in one of my first blog posts before starting this thread:

    I know that my path to success is to break up the full effort into smaller projects while keeping the subject of restoration as useable as possible at all times. No extended stay in the yard, no multi-year effort to bring Petrel to perfection and certainly no more dismantling than is absolutely necessary to move forward.
    So far I suppose I've mostly been able to do that, if by "useable" you mean that I could start the engine, get her out of the slip for an hour or so and make it back. But here we are, nearly four years into the process. Petrel is half torn apart and I can count on one hand the number of times we have actually taken her out. I've made some real progress in a few areas but I have also spent a LOT of time trying to avoid the larger projects - to punt them down the road a bit just for the sake of getting on the water. Doesn't seem to have been all that successful though, has it?

    Realistically, for Petrel to be truly useable, I need to:

    - Complete the reframing from the pilothouse aft
    - Build the new aft deck, including modifications to the pilothouse door and bulkhead
    - Complete systems repairs and/or replacement (electrical, fuel, and steering at minimum)
    - Full engine service including replacement of all hoses and conversion to spin-on filters
    - Repair the exhaust (replace the dry stack or convert to wet exhaust)
    - Finish the pilothouse and trunk cabin repairs (portholes, pilothouse windows, paint)

    There are other tasks that I could do later - installing floors forward of the engine, replacing the Velvet Drive with a spare unit I have, etc. - but those aren't critical for safe and comfortable use of the boat. But I think everything on that main list is. And I'm just deluding myself if I keep thinking there is some shortcut to getting there without doing all of those projects.

    I'm also realizing that I'm not the same person I was when I started this process. Back in 2014 I had just cut up Perihelion and was feeling pretty down about it. And I was not at all confident in my ability to do the work that Petrel needed. My woodworking skills were nonexistent and I didn't have the tools even if I had the skill. Now, while I wouldn't consider myself to be an expert at all this, or even close, I think I might be in sight of adequate. Close enough that I am not intimidated by anything on that list. So what am I waiting for? Why spend time on anything temporary when all that will do is put off the point where the list is done and we can use Petrel without worrying that some "future" project will suddenly become a "now" project, with attendant urgency, not to mention potential danger?

    So I'm thinking about things.

  19. #2819
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I hesitate to make any recommendations here because it is your time and money. But you know what I would do.

    It does seem like you may have crossed the point of no return when you cut out the deck though...
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  20. #2820
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I like the previous suggestion of making the temporary deck a modular affair. You could easily build a support framework from dimensional hem/fir and plywood deck sections that may be lifted in and out...perhaps screwed down in a few strategic places. I'd just go with whatever 1-inch ply you get a good price on and give it a few coats of porch and deck paint. Heck, sprinkle sand on it while you're at it if you like. A structure like this would be easy to work around as you decide how and when and how much to do to Petrel going forward. The emphasis is on keeping her functional; I've made the mistake of having a boat laid up for years while working on it, and realize the sadness of that situation.
    --​Anson, M/V Kingfisher

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  21. #2821
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by jsjpd1 View Post
    I hesitate to make any recommendations here because it is your time and money. But you know what I would do.

    It does seem like you may have crossed the point of no return when you cut out the deck though...
    Yes, it does doesn't it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sabre View Post
    I like the previous suggestion of making the temporary deck a modular affair. You could easily build a support framework from dimensional hem/fir and plywood deck sections that may be lifted in and out...perhaps screwed down in a few strategic places. I'd just go with whatever 1-inch ply you get a good price on and give it a few coats of porch and deck paint. Heck, sprinkle sand on it while you're at it if you like. A structure like this would be easy to work around as you decide how and when and how much to do to Petrel going forward. The emphasis is on keeping her functional; I've made the mistake of having a boat laid up for years while working on it, and realize the sadness of that situation.
    Sabre I agree in principle. That's certainly been my plan, having gone through the long-term restoration process with another boat - a project that did not end well. But it does feel like I've spent a lot of time avoiding the inevitable by continuing to focus on "keeping her functional". At a certain point maybe I have to acknowledge that she's *not* functional, even though the engine runs and she's not sinking. And that a cobbled-together aft deck isn't going to fix all of the other stuff that needs doing.

  22. #2822
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I don’t see why you couldn’t realistically chunk the work up into phases, if you really wanted to keep the boat running. But it would require some dedicated time and funds. For example, a three week haul out to get the aft frames all sistered and maybe a start on the back deck. Then back into the water. But that only works if you can pause work and various life functions for that time and come up with the scratch so you can focus in the boat for 8-10 hours a day. Trying to work around the major structural issues while on the water seems like an exercise in frustration.

    My dad suggested that I put off launching Amazon for another year to finish off the interior for that very reason. Everything is at least 50% harder when the boat is in the water.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  23. #2823
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by jsjpd1 View Post
    I don’t see why you couldn’t realistically chunk the work up into phases, if you really wanted to keep the boat running. But it would require some dedicated time and funds. For example, a three week haul out to get the aft frames all sistered and maybe a start on the back deck. Then back into the water. But that only works if you can pause work and various life functions for that time and come up with the scratch so you can focus in the boat for 8-10 hours a day. Trying to work around the major structural issues while on the water seems like an exercise in frustration.

    My dad suggested that I put off launching Amazon for another year to finish off the interior for that very reason. Everything is at least 50% harder when the boat is in the water.

    That’s definitely part of the problem Jim. Life hasn’t allowed that sort of time for the boat recently. But if I could get the frames and beam shelf for the new deck done in a concentrated effort it would sure make a lot of other things easier. Most of the mechanical and systems work can be done in the water easily enough.

  24. #2824
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    Chris, if you use plywood, seal the edges with epoxy screw it down with soft caulking or rubber gaskets between the edges, use screws with gasket washers, paint it with non-skid paint.... Someday, when time and budget allow, take the plywood off flip it over and you have the unfinished Bottom now on top, ready for a permanent deck. the supporting structure will be the same
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  25. #2825
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Chris, if you use plywood, seal the edges with epoxy screw it down with soft caulking or rubber gaskets between the edges, use screws with gasket washers, paint it with non-skid paint.... Someday, when time and budget allow, take the plywood off flip it over and you have the unfinished Bottom now on top, ready for a permanent deck. the supporting structure will be the same
    That all sounds reasonable Denise. The problem is that I can't create a final supporting structure yet because I want to lower the deck level. We found that the working deck with very low bulwarks may be great for landing salmon and unloading them but it's useless for keeping a very active kid onboard. Lowering the deck means Petrel needs a new beam shelf. Which I can't really do until the frame repairs are done. The ankle bone's connected to the shin bone...

    Anyway, after sleeping on it I've decided that instead of a temporary deck I'm just going build a small deck-height platform at the outside helm. More of a step than a deck. Enough to make it easy to get on and off the boat and into the pilothouse and enough to steer from but no more. That will let me move Petrel as needed but it won't take much time to build and it won't be in the way of any of the work I need to do.

    Once that's done I can work on the priority list. Laminating frames, fixing the steering (again) and the oil leak (also again) and sorting out the various systems that still need attention.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    ^^ Teak parquet?

    I was thinking much more temporary than that. Dimensional-lumber-and-fir-plywood temporary.
    Glass it and that will be 20 year temporary.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Glass it and that will be 20 year temporary.
    Yes... but I'd still need to fashion a new beam shelf. Can't do anything permanent (or "20 year temporary") until then. So instead I got started on the temporary platform this afternoon. First I had to remove this piece of steel flat stock that was holding the bulkhead pieces together:



    Of course everything was rusted solid so that was an hour of hard labor with hack saw, cold chisel and mallet. But with that off I could work on the framing:



    Had to knock off for dinner at this point but I got the forward edge mostly done. The whole platform will be 2' x 4' and will lift out for easy removal. And I'm using scrap 2x4s and self-tapping screws. Doesn't get much more temporary than that.

  28. #2828
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Chris are they from the 4X4s you had? Love the quarter-sawn scrap!
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  29. #2829
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    ^^^ Yep A few too many knots to make good boat lumber but not bad for Home Depot.

  30. #2830
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Just a note about rise if you do steps up to the pilot house Chris. 7" step risers seem to be most comfortable without feeling like one will trip.. or in my case.. fall up stairs
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  31. #2831
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Just a note about rise if you do steps up to the pilot house Chris. 7" step risers seem to be most comfortable without feeling like one will trip.. or in my case.. fall up stairs
    The temporary platform is actually level with the pilothouse sole. The challenge isn't to make steps, it's how to lower the level of the door sill so that I can just walk straight in. I could just cut it down of course. But that bulkhead is the last crossmember tying the sides of the boat together. And it's so badly hacked up already that if I enlarge the door opening there won't be anything connecting port to starboard at the sheer clamp. For now I'm going to leave it alone, and maybe a step there will be the right solution. Longer term though I'll need to engineer something to restore the structural integrity of this bulkhead.

  32. #2832
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Your just kidding yourself thinking that a temporary fix will be temporary. Whatever you build into the boat will stay. Just build it the way you want it the first time and be done with it.

  33. #2833
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Your just kidding yourself thinking that a temporary fix will be temporary. Whatever you build into the boat will stay. Just build it the way you want it the first time and be done with it.
    That's the plan now - just build the final structure the first time. But in the meantime I need a way to get on and off the boat and a way to operate the boat in the event that I need to move it. Hence a temporary platform or step. It won't take more than an hour or two to make and it won't actually be "built into" the boat at all so I think I'll get a pass on the temporary permanent fix trap. There must be some clause there that excludes items that are not fastened down, no?

    Then, once I can actually move around/on/off the boat without shuffling stepladders each time I can get back to the permanent work.

  34. #2834
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    Default

    Do what you need to do Chris all the advice here is just going to slow you down LOL
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  35. #2835
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Nah, the advice is all good Denise. What is slowing me down is the need to make a living, cook the occasional dinner, spend time with the family - you know, the little stuff But in a few days Tory and Dash are headed to New York for a couple of weeks to visit Nana. And Petrel's slip is a five minute walk from my office. So I should be able to get some real work done soon.

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