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Thread: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

  1. #3711
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Personally I don't think tiles have a place on a boat. There's something just wrong about them. And I hope I don't offend, but you'd want to do a better job then those green ones!
    Quote Originally Posted by Garret View Post
    My vote (like it matters) would be copper or stainless over tile. Tile (IMO) is too busy & is also much more difficult to clean.

    Gingerbread House thread drift: When I got married back in the late 70's 2 friends made the wedding cake - a glorious spice cake with whipped cream frosting. They brought it up to the tent (it was an outdoor wedding) & Maura said "Don't cut from this side of the cake!" & went back home to change. After the wedding, when it was just the closest friends hanging out, I finally asked her why I couldn't cut from that part of the cake (I'd been good & carefully avoided it). She went over to the cake, turned it around & said "Stick your finger in there". I did & hit something solid. Turned out that one whole corner of the rectangular tall cake was cardboard, covered with the whipped cream. Seems their dog had enjoyed a pre-wedding treat & eaten about 1/4 of it. They cut that portion away, built the cardboard replacement & frosted it.

    No one (outside of a small circle of friends) ever knew
    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    They put granite countertops in new boats. I just about croaked when I saw that. A spot of tile is nothing compared to that.
    I get the dislike of tile on boats. And I wouldn't tile the cabin sole in the head for example. But I don't have a problem with tile as a stove surround. Maybe it's because I grew up on a boat heated by a wood stove with a tile surround, but to me that seems like a perfectly shipshape use of the material. However I'm with navydog on the subject of granite or marble countertops aboard. Awful. Of course I don't like them in houses either, but still. Copper might be a nice option though. Looks great and has the advantage of matching the original material. Choices...


    Garrett, that's a great story about the wedding cake! Dogs, food and special occasions are just a combination begging for disaster.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Something I did not mention earlier, the air space should be 1 inch or more based on information I found from several sources when I was planning a stove installatiion. That allows sufficient natural airflow. If you must use a smaller gap between the wall and shield, then forced airflow is recommended.

    I installed a rock veneer around a wood stove that was rated to heat 2000 sq ft. A 1 inch airspace and several vents acheived the goal of protecting the drywall and studs behind the stove.

  3. #3713
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    "Tile (IMO) is too busy & is also much more difficult to clean."

    I used 12" square tiles, satin black finish, fit tight. Suited my budget, skill level, and taste. With the exception of a 2" margin around the edges, it is invisible. Same colour as the soot involved in Dickenson ownership. / Jim

  4. #3714
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    I get the dislike of tile on boats.
    The little white hex ones ? They look appropriate on counters in the head on boats of a certain age.

    On the other hand, a lot of people don't even like those old-fashioned fussy things on land, so ...

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    Plain old galvanized would be okay. (Obviously not for food preparation services )I believe there is also a stainless that's made that is not shiny it's more of a pewter look
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I, too, have spent time aboard with small heaters with tile surrounds. They're lovely and never looked a bit out of place to me. A good buddy has this exact arrangement on his Ericson and it's fabulous.

    My only thought about this installation is that, whatever material you choose, it's the air gap that is the essential part. As you know, those stoves are freakin' hot! And when you lift up the little damper to swirl the flue gasses around the oven, they get even hotter. Tile wouldn't be harmed by intense heat, of course, but what would you mount it on? It won't adhere worth a damn to any metal, with the possible exception of expanded lath metal, but that isn't stiff enough and itself needs to be attached to a rigid substrate. Cement board might work as it's certainly rigid, but it's awfully brittle.

    Kingfisher has a big stainless surround that goes up the bulkhead behind the stove to include the overhead, but around the stove itself you honestly can't really even see it.

    Just my unsolicited $0.02.

    Last edited by Sabre; 12-06-2018 at 01:03 AM.
    --​Anson, M/V Kingfisher

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Bring on the heat. Tiles glued to Nomex pad with RTV silicone:

    "The tiles were not mechanically fastened to the vehicle, but glued. Since the brittle tiles could not flex with the underlying vehicle [aluminum] skin , they were glued to Nomex felt Strain Isolation Pads (SIPs) with RTV silicone adhesive, which were in turn glued to the orbiter skin. These isolated the tiles from the orbiter's structural deflections and expansions.[1]"Jenkins, Dennis R. (2007). Space Shuttle: The History of the National Space Transportation System. Voyageur Press. p. 524 pages. ISBN 0-9633974-5-1.

    https://www.airspacemag.com/how-thin...iles-12580671/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_...tection_system

    I think attaching the tiles with RTV to an adequately primed substrate would be fine. Then fill the gaps with tile cement.
    Last edited by dinoa; 12-06-2018 at 12:13 PM.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I'm betting the wedding cake thief was a Labrador. Great recovery.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    I'm betting the wedding cake thief was a Labrador. Great recovery.
    1/2 Malamute, 1/4 Great Pyrenees, & 1/4 Wolf. One of the best dogs I've ever known - even though she wasn't mine. Strong but gentle & great with kids. Boy could she run!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Copper might be a nice option though. Looks great and has the advantage of matching the original material.
    Chris, somewhere in the boathouse -- in the loft I think -- is a long flat box with a 6 ft by 1 ft piece of fairly heavy (I forget how thick) copper sheet, mostly unmolested. It might be useful if you go that way. Copper is expensive!

    --Paul

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by ulav8r View Post
    Something I did not mention earlier, the air space should be 1 inch or more based on information I found from several sources when I was planning a stove installatiion. That allows sufficient natural airflow. If you must use a smaller gap between the wall and shield, then forced airflow is recommended.

    I installed a rock veneer around a wood stove that was rated to heat 2000 sq ft. A 1 inch airspace and several vents acheived the goal of protecting the drywall and studs behind the stove.
    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    "Tile (IMO) is too busy & is also much more difficult to clean."

    I used 12" square tiles, satin black finish, fit tight. Suited my budget, skill level, and taste. With the exception of a 2" margin around the edges, it is invisible. Same colour as the soot involved in Dickenson ownership. / Jim
    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite View Post
    The little white hex ones ? They look appropriate on counters in the head on boats of a certain age.

    On the other hand, a lot of people don't even like those old-fashioned fussy things on land, so ...
    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Plain old galvanized would be okay. (Obviously not for food preparation services )I believe there is also a stainless that's made that is not shiny it's more of a pewter look
    Quote Originally Posted by Sabre View Post
    I, too, have spent time aboard with small heaters with tile surrounds. They're lovely and never looked a bit out of place to me. A good buddy has this exact arrangement on his Ericson and it's fabulous.

    My only thought about this installation is that, whatever material you choose, it's the air gap that is the essential part. As you know, those stoves are freakin' hot! And when you lift up the little damper to swirl the flue gasses around the oven, they get even hotter. Tile wouldn't be harmed by intense heat, of course, but what would you mount it on? It won't adhere worth a damn to any metal, with the possible exception of expanded lath metal, but that isn't stiff enough and itself needs to be attached to a rigid substrate. Cement board might work as it's certainly rigid, but it's awfully brittle.

    Kingfisher has a big stainless surround that goes up the bulkhead behind the stove to include the overhead, but around the stove itself you honestly can't really even see it.

    Just my unsolicited $0.02.

    Quote Originally Posted by dinoa View Post
    Bring on the heat. Tiles glued to Nomex pad with RTV silicone:

    "The tiles were not mechanically fastened to the vehicle, but glued. Since the brittle tiles could not flex with the underlying vehicle [aluminum] skin , they were glued to Nomex felt Strain Isolation Pads (SIPs) with RTV silicone adhesive, which were in turn glued to the orbiter skin. These isolated the tiles from the orbiter's structural deflections and expansions.[1]"Jenkins, Dennis R. (2007). Space Shuttle: The History of the National Space Transportation System. Voyageur Press. p. 524 pages. ISBN 0-9633974-5-1.

    https://www.airspacemag.com/how-thin...iles-12580671/

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_...tection_system

    I think attaching the tiles with RTV to an adequately primed substrate would be fine. Then fill the gaps with tile cement.
    For tile, the recommendation from Dickinson is for a base layer of 1/4" ceramic fiber insulating board (e.g. Kaowool or similar) with tile over that. Fortunately the structural stresses aboard Skookum Maru are not likely to approach those of the space shuttle so I could probably get away with standard tile adhesive.

    However right now I'm leaning toward using copper. Looks good, easy to work with and matches what was there originally. Not the cheapest option but I don't need a whole lot of it.


    Quote Originally Posted by _QB_ View Post
    Chris, somewhere in the boathouse -- in the loft I think -- is a long flat box with a 6 ft by 1 ft piece of fairly heavy (I forget how thick) copper sheet, mostly unmolested. It might be useful if you go that way. Copper is expensive!

    --Paul
    Thanks Paul. I did see that last weekend when I was up there but all the panels I need to make are too large for that piece. The sides are approximately 21" x 21" and the back and bottom panels are both 21" x 29".

    The plan at the moment is to head up to Blaine on Sunday to take accurate measurements of the stove cutout and make patterns for all the pieces. With that done I can make up the copper panels for the heat shield down here in Seattle so that I can install everything as soon as I have another free weekend.

  12. #3722
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    The plan at the moment is to head up to Blaine on Sunday...
    Seems like you've got another interested watcher ... there was a grey whale swimming around the harbor today, probably wondering why that stove isn't in yet.

    Not kidding. A guy was stainding by where Plover parks, I asked "Whatcha lookin at ?" right as he/she came up to breathe.

    Oh ! A whale !

    It was pretty impressive. Can you get a ticket for bothering a whale when you're standing on the dock and they come to visit ?

    He or she hung around for three or four hours then it got dark. Maybe still out there, waiting to see if you're ever going to get that damn stove installed

  13. #3723
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite View Post
    Seems like you've got another interested watcher ... there was a grey whale swimming around the harbor today, probably wondering why that stove isn't in yet.

    Not kidding. A guy was stainding by where Plover parks, I asked "Whatcha lookin at ?" right as he/she came up to breathe.

    Oh ! A whale !

    It was pretty impressive. Can you get a ticket for bothering a whale when you're standing on the dock and they come to visit ?

    He or she hung around for three or four hours then it got dark. Maybe still out there, waiting to see if you're ever going to get that damn stove installed
    I was there for that, too. First time that anyone has ever seen one in the marina. When grey whales lose their navigation fix, they find themselves in the damnedest places.

    NOAA was up in a helicopter earlier today looking for it. No sign of it today in the harbor...I hope it found its way out to open water.
    --​Anson, M/V Kingfisher

    Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible. ~The Dalai Lama

  14. #3724
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite View Post
    Seems like you've got another interested watcher ... there was a grey whale swimming around the harbor today, probably wondering why that stove isn't in yet.

    Not kidding. A guy was stainding by where Plover parks, I asked "Whatcha lookin at ?" right as he/she came up to breathe.

    Oh ! A whale !

    It was pretty impressive. Can you get a ticket for bothering a whale when you're standing on the dock and they come to visit ?

    He or she hung around for three or four hours then it got dark. Maybe still out there, waiting to see if you're ever going to get that damn stove installed
    Quote Originally Posted by Sabre View Post
    I was there for that, too. First time that anyone has ever seen one in the marina. When grey whales lose their navigation fix, they find themselves in the damnedest places.

    NOAA was up in a helicopter earlier today looking for it. No sign of it today in the harbor...I hope it found its way out to open water.
    Sorry I missed the whale in the harbor. I'm amazed that something that large would voluntarily swim though the rather narrow opening in the breakwater! Spent the weekend decorating the house and didn't get up to Blaine. But I did take a few minutes to do a drawing for the heat shield and send it off to Ballard Sheet Metal for a quote so that's some progress I suppose.



    Yes, I'm sure I *could* make it myself however I don't have much in the way of metal working tools so it's easier to have a shop to the work. But if the quote is too high I might pick up a cheap sheet metal brake from Harbor Freight and have a go at it - we'll see.

    In other news, I go word that the stove is ready for pickup so I'll be doing that this week but I'm just going to stick it in my shop until the space for it is ready.
    Last edited by cstevens; 12-09-2018 at 06:52 PM.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    ... if the quote is too high I might pick up a cheap sheet metal brake from Harbor Freight and have a go at it - we'll see.
    For one part ? No way, Jose ! Definitely not worth it. But if I might make a suggestion .... normally you'd want to spec the holes a sixteenth larger than the bolt. If they follow your print like they should, you won't have any slack in bolthole location. You always want a little clearance around a bolt.

    Is there anything going underneath the stove ? Is that something to be concerned about ? Seems like heat would radiate in all directions.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    "But if the quote is too high I might pick up a cheap sheet metal brake from Harbor Freight and have a go at it - we'll see."

    I'd ask them how much less it would be if you dropped off 3, 1/2" cement-board panels that you would like faced and edged in copper sheeting. Do your own drilling. imho. / Jim

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite View Post
    For one part ? No way, Jose ! Definitely not worth it. But if I might make a suggestion .... normally you'd want to spec the holes a sixteenth larger than the bolt. If they follow your print like they should, you won't have any slack in bolthole location. You always want a little clearance around a bolt.

    Is there anything going underneath the stove ? Is that something to be concerned about ? Seems like heat would radiate in all directions.
    Well, HF sells a cheap 30" brake for $65, which I suspect is less than the setup charge from any fab shop. I wouldn't be able to do the radiused bend that I've specified in the drawing with it but that's not critical. So that's an option but I'm going to see what they come back with first.

    As for the holes, I was planning to use #12 pan head screws to mount it so there should be plenty of clearance. Even if I go with #14 screws there would be a little room. And there isn't any alignment needed when it's mounted since the I'll use the shield to drill the pilot holes.

    Dickinson doesn't specify any insulation or a clearance requirement for the bottom at all. The bottom panel will be 3/4" plywood edged with roofing copper.

    Quote Originally Posted by chas View Post
    "But if the quote is too high I might pick up a cheap sheet metal brake from Harbor Freight and have a go at it - we'll see."

    I'd ask them how much less it would be if you dropped off 3, 1/2" cement-board panels that you would like faced and edged in copper sheeting. Do your own drilling. imho. / Jim
    Good thought. That was my original plan but then I priced out the amount of copper sheet that I would need to cover the insulation board. And then when I recovered from the shock a bit I realized that no one is ever going to see anything further than an inch or two away from the edge. So instead I am planning to make edge trim from 2" wide roofing copper, which I should be able to form with nothing more complicated than a piece of wood and a mallet. Anything past that will be hidden by the shield, which will be mounted on 1/2" stand-offs. The drawing is actually for that piece. And it's going to be stainless instead of copper because it won't be very visible either. It's entirely hidden by the stove.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Well, ...I realized that no one is ever going to see anything further than an inch or two away from the edge. So instead I am planning to make edge trim from 2" wide roofing copper, which I should be able to form with nothing more complicated than a piece of wood and a mallet. Anything past that will be hidden by the shield, which will be mounted on 1/2" stand-offs. The drawing is actually for that piece. And it's going to be stainless instead of copper because it won't be very visible either. It's entirely hidden by the stove.
    The stainless panels will function more effectively than copper because it is less conductive. The silver panels may? Be a better reflector of IR radiation. 40 years ago I fabricated a Neptune IIA sized cookstove. I used a salvaged castiron cooktop and bought new neptune searails from Doc Freemans.i made the outside panels fron 316 stainless and the oven and internals from mild steel. It work really well, the oven got hot much faster than a factory neptune since the outer panels weren't as good at radiating heat. I made heatshields from glass enameled sheetmetal panels which were made from metal salvaged from 1940s era domestic electric ranges. I cut the panels to size with a very small cutting torch which prevented fracturing of the vitrious enamel. The panel standoffs were made from sections cut from the porcelin knob and tube style insulator tubes.

  19. #3729
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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    As for the holes, I was planning to use #12 pan head screws to mount it so there should be plenty of clearance. Even if I go with #14 screws there would be a little room. And there isn't any alignment needed when it's mounted since the I'll use the shield to drill the pilot holes.
    Okey-doke, sorry, I saw the 1/4 and jumped to conclusions. You normally want clearance on bolt holes tho. Even if you are not worried about alignment, it just works better.

    Trouble with doing it yourself is springback and having the bends come out where you want them. Like woodworking, takes a little practice. Sometimes you don't want to practice, you just want to get it done

    And drilling ... good thing it's stainless. You don't want to try drilling copper. It's nasty to work with. A sheet metal shop would punch those holes, not drill them. Even in stainless if you have to drill the holes, sandwich the sheet between two pieces of something sturdy. Wood, plywood, phenolic, something. Sheet metals don't like to drill nicely.

    If you do have to drill copper some time, hit the cutting edges of the lips of the drill with a stone to dull them. Otherwise it will grab and pull itself into the work and twist the metal all around and make a mess. Probably try to do that anyway but the dull edges do help. Copper grabs really bad.

    All the gatehouses have signs up, "If you see the whale, call Beechwood 4-5789" It's kinda cute but I think he's gone
    Last edited by Favorite; 12-10-2018 at 03:14 AM.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    They put granite countertops in new boats. I just about croaked when I saw that. A spot of tile is nothing compared to that.
    The granite would be better suited as ballast in the bilge. Some of the Seattle streets were once paved with cobble stone blocks which came to town via lumber schooners as ballast which was backhauled after the ships had delivered their cargo of local lumber to other ports.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I have seen scorched wood behind improperly installed stone and ceramic heatshields around heating stoves. The mass of the stone acted as a thermal flywheel and delayed but didn't decrease the temperatures reached on the backside. If you were worried about temperatures behind your shields, thermocouples could be embedded there to give real time information, but shouldn't be necessary with proper installation.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite View Post
    Sometimes you don't want to practice, you just want to get it done
    Yes - exactly! Spring back, drilling holes... all things I'm sure I could deal with given time and practice but I'd rather have someone else do that this time assuming the cost is reasonable.

    Quote Originally Posted by Psuggmog View Post
    The granite would be better suited as ballast in the bilge. Some of the Seattle streets were once paved with cobble stone blocks which came to town via lumber schooners as ballast which was backhauled after the ships had delivered their cargo of local lumber to other ports.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psuggmog View Post
    I have seen scorched wood behind improperly installed stone and ceramic heatshields around heating stoves. The mass of the stone acted as a thermal flywheel and delayed but didn't decrease the temperatures reached on the backside. If you were worried about temperatures behind your shields, thermocouples could be embedded there to give real time information, but shouldn't be necessary with proper installation.
    Still a few cobblestone streets left I think. A few down by the Pike Place market and one block of McGraw up here on Queen Anne that I know of but there are others. Someone on one of the bicycle forums came up with a list in honor of Paris-Roubaix and the other bicycle races that have cobblestone sections. It was longer than I expected. When I was a kid they seemed like a piece of history in a city that still had some memory of where it came from - logging, fishing, building things. Now they just seem like an anachronism in an increasingly soulless and generic metropolis. I'm in tech so perhaps that makes me part of the problem but I hate the rush to obliterate any trace of the past from Seattle.

    Anyway, I was doing some research on insulation and what I found shows that tile is not a good insulator. Ceramic fiber board is top of the list with an R-value of around 1.1 for 1/2" thickness. Ceramic tile is way down at the bottom of the list of stove insulating materials at 0.02 for 1/4" thickness. The R-value of a 1/2" air gap is considerably higher than that at somewhere between 0.6 and 2.6 depending on the effective emittance of the surface of the walls facing the gap. The best practice would be to line both faces with shiny aluminum foil, which has a very low emittance.

    All that is for a still air gap and does not take convection from air flow through the gap into account. Adding air flow would increase the R-value further but I didn't find a formula for calculating it. Interestingly, Dickinson specifies either a 1/2" air gap *or* 1/4" ceramic tile for the heat shield (either one backed by 1/4" ceramic fiber board) but those two options are not at all equivalent.

  23. #3733

    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    When drilling stainless, it can be tricky, it work hardens quickly, don't use the peck method. Use sharp cobalt drill bits, you may need a few of the same size. Get them at a machine shop supply. Once you get a cut going, don't back off. Never let the drill spin, the stainless will harden then you are screwed. Time to find another place for a hole and another drill bit.. Stainless is soft, so it can be easy or impossible.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Downwindtracker2 View Post
    When drilling stainless, it can be tricky, it work hardens quickly, don't use the peck method. Use sharp cobalt drill bits, you may need a few of the same size. Get them at a machine shop supply. Once you get a cut going, don't back off. Never let the drill spin, the stainless will harden then you are screwed. Time to find another place for a hole and another drill bit.. Stainless is soft, so it can be easy or impossible.
    Thanks Ray - that's handy info. Fortunately the fab shop came back with a quote that was less than what I expected so I won't have to tackle that part of the job myself. Progress...

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Downwindtracker2 View Post
    Never let the drill spin, the stainless will harden then you are screwed. Time to find another place for a hole and another drill bit..
    No, oddly enough a center drill will go through that. So will carbide but you're not going to be successful with that in a hand drill. A drill press is a big help with a lot of this.

    The best tool for sheetmetal is a funny-looking thing like an upside-down Christmas tree with a slot cut in one side. Those work really good for making burr-free holes in thin materials. Can't remember where they are hidden in the catalogs now, I just call it a 'sheet metal drill' but worth having one. They are stepped so you can do several different sizes, depending on how deep you go.

    On bigger holes, just use punches. They are a thousand times easier and produce nice clean round holes. Electricians commonly use/have them.

    Stainless is soft, so it can be easy or impossible.
    Depends on what alloy you are talking about. I wouldn't classify any of them as "soft", they are all steel with varying amounts of chrome and other elements. 304 is a heck of a lot easier to work with than 316 tho, agreed. Too bad 316 works better

  26. #3736

    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I think they are called step-drills. Industrial electricians use them a lot for their cabinets, but I've never used one.

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    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    on Amazon they are calling it a "step drill" ……...I think that's inaccurate, but I am a machinist.
    Anyway, here is a link:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/5Pcs-Large-...6295:rk:4:pf:0
    It's a set, and probably you don't need that many....but for the price it's OK I think.

    step drill.jpg
    1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
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  28. #3738
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    2,953

    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Favorite View Post
    No, oddly enough a center drill will go through that. So will carbide but you're not going to be successful with that in a hand drill. A drill press is a big help with a lot of this.

    The best tool for sheetmetal is a funny-looking thing like an upside-down Christmas tree with a slot cut in one side. Those work really good for making burr-free holes in thin materials. Can't remember where they are hidden in the catalogs now, I just call it a 'sheet metal drill' but worth having one. They are stepped so you can do several different sizes, depending on how deep you go.

    On bigger holes, just use punches. They are a thousand times easier and produce nice clean round holes. Electricians commonly use/have them.


    Depends on what alloy you are talking about. I wouldn't classify any of them as "soft", they are all steel with varying amounts of chrome and other elements. 304 is a heck of a lot easier to work with than 316 tho, agreed. Too bad 316 works better
    Quote Originally Posted by Downwindtracker2 View Post
    I think they are called step-drills. Industrial electricians use them a lot for their cabinets, but I've never used one.
    Quote Originally Posted by 2dogsnight View Post
    on Amazon they are calling it a "step drill" ……...I think that's inaccurate, but I am a machinist.
    Anyway, here is a link:
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/5Pcs-Large-...6295:rk:4:pf:0
    It's a set, and probably you don't need that many....but for the price it's OK I think.

    step drill.jpg

    I've always called it a "unibit" but I think that's a trade name for a specific version of that device. I have a couple of them in different size ranges and they definitely do work better than twist bits for sheet metal. But I'm not going to need it for this job.

  29. #3739
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,155

    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Chris, I suggest placing the copper over the stainless as an accent to eliminate any seams that could separate if there was an actual fire. In commercial equipment intended for fire protection all the seams are required to be welded. It's not needed for your application, however I'm sure you see my point.
    Last edited by navydog; 12-11-2018 at 10:38 AM.

  30. #3740
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    lagunitas, ca, usa
    Posts
    102

    Default Re: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    I've always called it a "unibit" but I think that's a trade name for a specific version ...
    There ya go. I knew it was stored in the meat ram somewhere That is the real name, because that version was the original.

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