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Thread: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    Regarding that four slot pulley, you sure you don't want to keep it to run a big pump or compressor or something? Sure could make a helluva anchor chain wash down pump.

    Well, I definitely need at least one belt for a hydraulic pump to run the anchor winch. And sure - at some point it might be nice to have an engine-driven water pump as well. Could use for washdown, emergency bilge pump, etc. But the problem is that the four-row pulley extends several inches past where the bulkhead would land. Moving the bulkhead forward won't work for any number of reasons (I want to maximize cabin space, the current bulkhead is positioned to be the forward face of the pilothouse and it ties to a major cabin support beam) so I'm stuck with what I have. The motor is really wedged in. About an inch of clearance aft and above and maybe that much forward after I swap the pulley. The companionway steps clear the thermostat by about half an inch on that side. As it is I might need to mount a jackshaft for the anchor winch pump since I need to move that as well. It was originally mounted in front of the motor (on the platform welded to the starboard engine stringer) but that placement would interfere with my new bulkhead too.

  2. #72
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    A day of much effort and zero progress on Petrel today. Went down this morning to continue scraping paint. Got ten minutes into it and the cheap hobby heat gun that I've been using died with an ugly rattle. No surprise there as it was a piece of junk. I have a much nicer one somewhere that vanished in my shop move last year. I had no idea where it could be but I hate few things more than having to buy a tool I already own so I was determined to find it. On that mission Addie (dog) and I headed to my shop in Ballard to sort through every box, bin and pile.

    On the way out the car we saw this lovely launch sitting on a trailer. Some research on the Google shows that she is a replica Kingston Boat built by the NWSWB. Sadly it looks like the engine - I think a Stuart Turner P55 - has a cracked block. I hope she gets needed repairs and is back on the water soon.






    On my way to the shop I stopped by Seaview to check on Snoose. She looks great as usual.



    but no sign of Ron LL so we braved the traffic and chaos around the Sustainable Ballard Festival to get to my shop. Once there I turned over every stack of boxes, emptied out every bin, sorted through all my tools (sadly still in disarray from the move - must get to that one day) but no heat gun. So off to the house to see if by some chance it migrated to the basement. The basement being no better organized than my shop right now I repeated my session with boxes and piles there as well but with no joy.

    So then down to Petrel again to see if there was any chance I had just misplaced it aboard. Fortunately the boat is a bit better sorted so that was a quick stop but no luck. Finally then back over the Ballard Bridge (raised for boats, of course, so I had to wait in traffic again) to buy a replacement from Stone Way Hardware, our local purveyor of tools, fixtures and supplies to the amateur handyman-or-woman. Rats. I'm still annoyed and I'm sure my old one will resurface soon now. But off with my shiny new Dewalt heat gun in hand I went. Too late to get any work done by then but at least I am set for tomorrow.

    And on top of the tool fiasco, I found another problem that I need to deal with on Petrel. A few weeks back I noticed that the stays were getting a bit loose. "Hmmm," I thought sagely, "the stays are getting loose. I wonder why?", then gave the turnbuckles a few turns to tighten things up and went about my business. Note to self (one I've made many times before): Changes in things like the standing rigging always mean that something bad is happening and are ignored at one's peril.

    Sure enough, today I noticed that the stays were loose again. "Argh!" I thought. "Something bad is happening." This time I took a moment to poke around the mast step and indeed, bad things are happening.





    The mast step is collapsing and the mast is cracking at the base. Some tentative prodding reveals that it's pretty soft there as well. Sigh. The mast is not a critical part of Petrel to be sure but a mast and boom are a handy thing and, moreover, they make up a large part of her character. So that's another project on the list then. Meanwhile forumite Jim (chas) is texting me lovely photos of boats and anchorages from his travels to remind me of all the things I'd like to be doing more than scraping paint right now.



    Next year...

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Hey I'm getting on a plane. You got some other guy.

    Get back to work!! / Jim

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Good work you're doing there on Petrel Chris, could you make a step in sole to cover those engine bearers? I know itd be a PIA at first but after you've tripped over it 12 times itd grow on you

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Chris, could you make a step in sole to cover those engine bearers? I know itd be a PIA at first but after you've tripped over it 12 times itd grow on you
    Yes, but tripping over it wouldn't be my problem. While I was building the step I'd be irritated that I was spending time making something that I wasn't happy with, when the "right" solution would be to tear it all out and build a proper engine bed. Then when it was done I'd get annoyed every time I looked at it. The annoyance would fester, keeping me up at night. I'd question my worth as a human, the choices I made that led me to compromise my ideals and what lessons I was teaching my son about hard work and craftsmanship. My professional work would suffer as I surfed endlessly through the WoodenBoat forums obsessing over all the boats with perfectly flat cabin soles. Those builders and had remained true to their credo. They hadn't cobbled together some step-thingy hanging out there for all to see and mock. Benjamin Mendlowitz could go aboard those boats any time and shoot a cover shot for WB magazine. Some days I would go down to the boat and just stare at the step - stare at it in a bleak acceptance that my youth was gone, wasted in mediocrity. I would lose the will to measure twice. Once was plenty for the Salieri of boat restoration. Really, why measure at all? Who cares how many cuts you have to make anyway. It's all just time. And what is time when time stretches out across the grim landscape of failed dreams to the horizon of mortality? My wife, wonderful woman, would try to help. She would suggest another hobby. Gardening perhaps. I would try it just to make her happy. Things would be better for a while. A rose does not judge. It's just a rose. But that step - that infernal step - would always lie between us, the symbol of my failure as a man and a husband. Eventually she would take our son for an extended visit to her mother "just to get some space". Then one night, alone with my despair, I would find myself staring deep into a can of spar varnish and a vision of Bud McIntosh would form in the depths. He would speak to me, granting me absolution from the sin of the step and pointing to a path of redemption. The next evening I'd walk up an anonymous suburban driveway into a backyard bowshed to see a circle of men in faded Carhartt jackets, the lines of their addiction etched on their faces. Taking a cup of lukewarm coffee from the urn in the corner I would sit and introduce myself. "Hi, I'm Chris and I'm a perfectionist."

    So, on the balance, I think no step.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    That's hilarious. But I fear for the health of your boat. I don't think perfectionism and old wooden boats generally go well together. So many compromises, the best you can hope for is often a workable compromise. I can't see the pics for some reason, but spreading the engine loads has to be a good thing. For me there would be more perfection in keeping the bearers long, and having good clearance in front of the engine, and incorporating a clever step into the bulkhead. It's a boat, not a kitchen.

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Yes, but tripping over it wouldn't be my problem. While I was building the step I'd be irritated that I was spending time making something that I wasn't happy with, when the "right" solution would be to tear it all out and build a proper engine bed. Then when it was done I'd get annoyed every time I looked at it. The annoyance would fester, keeping me up at night. I'd question my worth as a human, the choices I made that led me to compromise my ideals and what lessons I was teaching my son about hard work and craftsmanship. My professional work would suffer as I surfed endlessly through the WoodenBoat forums obsessing over all the boats with perfectly flat cabin soles. Those builders and had remained true to their credo. They hadn't cobbled together some step-thingy hanging out there for all to see and mock. Benjamin Mendlowitz could go aboard those boats any time and shoot a cover shot for WB magazine. Some days I would go down to the boat and just stare at the step - stare at it in a bleak acceptance that my youth was gone, wasted in mediocrity. I would lose the will to measure twice. Once was plenty for the Salieri of boat restoration. Really, why measure at all? Who cares how many cuts you have to make anyway. It's all just time. And what is time when time stretches out across the grim landscape of failed dreams to the horizon of mortality? My wife, wonderful woman, would try to help. She would suggest another hobby. Gardening perhaps. I would try it just to make her happy. Things would be better for a while. A rose does not judge. It's just a rose. But that step - that infernal step - would always lie between us, the symbol of my failure as a man and a husband. Eventually she would take our son for an extended visit to her mother "just to get some space". Then one night, alone with my despair, I would find myself staring deep into a can of spar varnish and a vision of Bud McIntosh would form in the depths. He would speak to me, granting me absolution from the sin of the step and pointing to a path of redemption. The next evening I'd walk up an anonymous suburban driveway into a backyard bowshed to see a circle of men in faded Carhartt jackets, the lines of their addiction etched on their faces. Taking a cup of lukewarm coffee from the urn in the corner I would sit and introduce myself. "Hi, I'm Chris and I'm a perfectionist."

    So, on the balance, I think no step.
    Hey Chris, have you seen this thread?

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...and-redemption

    Might be a lesson there.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

  8. #78
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Yes, but tripping over it wouldn't be my problem. While I was building the step I'd be irritated that I was spending time making something that I wasn't happy with, when the "right" solution would be to tear it all out and build a proper engine bed. Then when it was done I'd get annoyed every time I looked at it. The annoyance would fester, keeping me up at night. I'd question my worth as a human, the choices I made that led me to compromise my ideals and what lessons I was teaching my son about hard work and craftsmanship. My professional work would suffer as I surfed endlessly through the WoodenBoat forums obsessing over all the boats with perfectly flat cabin soles. Those builders and had remained true to their credo. They hadn't cobbled together some step-thingy hanging out there for all to see and mock. Benjamin Mendlowitz could go aboard those boats any time and shoot a cover shot for WB magazine. Some days I would go down to the boat and just stare at the step - stare at it in a bleak acceptance that my youth was gone, wasted in mediocrity. I would lose the will to measure twice. Once was plenty for the Salieri of boat restoration. Really, why measure at all? Who cares how many cuts you have to make anyway. It's all just time. And what is time when time stretches out across the grim landscape of failed dreams to the horizon of mortality? My wife, wonderful woman, would try to help. She would suggest another hobby. Gardening perhaps. I would try it just to make her happy. Things would be better for a while. A rose does not judge. It's just a rose. But that step - that infernal step - would always lie between us, the symbol of my failure as a man and a husband. Eventually she would take our son for an extended visit to her mother "just to get some space". Then one night, alone with my despair, I would find myself staring deep into a can of spar varnish and a vision of Bud McIntosh would form in the depths. He would speak to me, granting me absolution from the sin of the step and pointing to a path of redemption. The next evening I'd walk up an anonymous suburban driveway into a backyard bowshed to see a circle of men in faded Carhartt jackets, the lines of their addiction etched on their faces. Taking a cup of lukewarm coffee from the urn in the corner I would sit and introduce myself. "Hi, I'm Chris and I'm a perfectionist."

    So, on the balance, I think no step.
    Geez, That drew a response! Sorry to suggest such a mediocre thing as a step. I'll just go in the corner and watch then.

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Sorry Andrew - I was just exercising my sense of humor again. Must remember not to do that! What you don't know is how many hours I've spent staring at that spot and thinking "I just need to build a step in the cabin sole. That would solve everything". I don't know why I resist it - it's the obvious and correct solution. You and Phil are right. It make no sense to compromise the structure of the boat here. So a step there will be. It still leaves me with some problems to solve in building out the head enclosure but I'll sort that out.

    Jim - yes, good point The goal for my efforts on Petrel is to learn from those mistakes. So, perfection be damned! Forward progress is everything. Idyllic harbors await, but only if Petrel is ready to go.

  10. #80
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I had the pleasure of seeing Wells Gray up close while I was Boat Haven Marina. She was just a couple of slips away.

    Cstevens - If you would like to get another look at her I think she is probably still at the end of dock C. She was there from last September until I left in mid June this year. She looks remarkable.

    Richard

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    Good. With hydraulic steering you can easily add an autopilot if you don't have one already. Believe me, you'll love it. Also maybe try Seattle Marine over on Commodore Way for helm wheels. And the have a lot of hydraulic steering things.
    Could you please inform me of where I could find the pros-and-cons of adding an autopilot to an existing hydraulic steering, plus how to put the two together (autopilot servo-motor coupled to the helm shaft via belt drive etc.) ? I have a Capilano (Canadian) hydraulic steering on my twin-diesel motor-cruiser.

    Thanks in anticipation.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Carioca, any autopilot will have an option for a hydraulic pump that would be plumbed into the existing lines. There are also belt or chain systems for mechanical steering but the pump is the way to go since you already have the hydraulic setup. There are plenty of resources online providing detailed instructions on how to select and install an autopilot. For example <http://www.boatingmag.com/how-to/installing-autopilot> and <http://www.westmarine.com/WestAdviso...g-an-Autopilot>. Best of luck with it!

  13. #83
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Some progress on Petrel yesterday. I removed the anchor winch:








    Things don't look too bad underneath which is nice to see, although I'd still like to pull up that pad and have a look at the deck. But the rode is another story. Here is what is left of the eye splice and shackle between the cable and the chain (after cutting off the chain).



    I wouldn't trust that to hold for a minute so replacing the anchor rode goes on the list of things to do as well. Then I spent some time stripping paint off of the trunk cabin sides.



    It's not much but it's a start.

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    ... fixed the photos so they should show up now.

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by carioca1232001 View Post
    Could you please inform me of where I could find the pros-and-cons of adding an autopilot to an existing hydraulic steering, plus how to put the two together (autopilot servo-motor coupled to the helm shaft via belt drive etc.) ? I have a Capilano (Canadian) hydraulic steering on my twin-diesel motor-cruiser.

    Thanks in anticipation.
    Chris is right, if you already have hydraulic steering, you are halfway there. Mine is an old Wagner built in Vancouver B. C. But it's difficult to get parts for now but I stumbled onto a guy in Ohio who rebuilds them as a hobby. Mine consists of a controller head that connects to a sensor added to my main compass, and a circuit board and motorized pump which plumbs into the existing hydraulic lines. The newer ones will be able to interface with your chart plotter. I use it a lot, of course I still have to be near the helm constantly watching for flotsam and traffic.

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    That seems like a bizarre anchoring set up.

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    That seems like a bizarre anchoring set up.
    How so? The on-deck hydraulic winch with cable and chain is pretty typical for a PNW fishing boat.

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    That seems like a bizarre anchoring set up.
    Very normal around here. Wish I had it on my boat.

  19. #89
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post





    The mast step is collapsing and the mast is cracking at the base. Some tentative prodding reveals that it's pretty soft there as well. Sigh. The mast is not a critical part of Petrel to be sure but a mast and boom are a handy thing and, moreover, they make up a large part of her character. So that's another project on the list then....
    Is the mast soft or just the step? It looks like you could lift the mast by using blocks and wedges under the shoulders and then remove/ replace the old step with the mast in place.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Both the mast and the step are soft unfortunately. Unstepping the mast is an easy job. One person can lift it off the step with no trouble. I'll probably remove it in the next couple of weeks as it will be easier to strip and paint the pilothouse behind it that way.

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I's a bit late in the game to ask, but is there a reason you opted not to use a chemical stripper? Did you try one and find it wasn't effective? I've never found dry stripping faster or more efficient than chemical stripping, and there are a number of good strippers, some of which are considerably more benign than MEK.

    I enjoy perusing these northwest threads. It seems like I know every boat and every vista. Wondering if "the Oregon Petrel" used to be the same Petrel that belonged to Chris and Kathy Grace out of Port Townsend and was sold a few years ago back to Oregon?

    Article Link

    I have some of my own photos of her (Petal......also of Wells Gray when she was owned by Dave Walker). I've cruised and rafted with both of those boats.
    Last edited by Lew Barrett; 08-29-2016 at 09:33 PM.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Lew, I've used chemical strippers in the past but have always found them to be messy and hard to control. I really like the heat gun although I'm beginning to think its not the fastest method - at least the way I'm going about it. But you are not the first person to suggest the chemical option so maybe it's time for me to revisit it. Any recommendations?

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Chris, try Soystrip or one of the other soy based strippers first as it's the least ugly to use. It usually worked well for me. If not, you're probably straight off to the MEK compounds. Jay Greer is fond of airplane strippers but I've used the generics like Jasco to good effect too. A nice thing about the soy based strippers is that you can cover them with plastic wrap which extends the working time. Try and see. You have little to loose. If that doesn't work for you, off to the MEK but be careful. You might find some areas where only a chemical stripper will be effective....around windows/port lights or where there is molding with ogee details and the like. Also I think it works better when there is some wind (vis a vis heat). Heat guns and wind can be a PITA.

    Also, I took a second look at the "Oregon Petrel" and is definitely Chris and Kathy's boat. Neat boat. Props for determination, pal!
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  24. #94
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I should add that chemical stripping is messy, no denying that. Eventually you do figure out ways to decrease the distgustingness but the up side for me is that it is a lot faster once you get your systems down and get rolling. Also, it's the only way to properly/safely do lead based paints.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Thanks Lew. I've used Jasco and airplane strippers in the past on cars and motorcycles. Very effective but awful to work with. I may give one of the eco strippers a try though. Several people have suggested it in addition to you so I should at least see it for myself.

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Paint ugh! Chris, may I swing you away from that topic to ask you about the dry stack? I was looking at your sketch ( nice sketch too!) and had a question about the telescoping joint at the top. Would you not want the top section to slide inside the lower section? that way any water or residue would stay within the pipe and not drip out of the joint? Ok ,back to scraping paint!
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...58#post3996158

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Thanks Denise! The slip joint is based on dry exhaust examples from Dave Gerr. He doesn't specify why the open end of outer section faces downward but he's the expert so I just followed the diagrams from his book. I've been rethinking the design of the exhaust a bit based on Ron LL's experience on Snoose though. Version II is in the works. But paint scraping has to happen first...

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Lew, using electric heat guns can be slow going for paint stripping but LPG gas torches are much quicker and the paint blisters without the wood underneath getting cooked so badly, in my limited experience. I've never seen professional house painters use anything else.

    Looking good Chris. I admire your dedication. All the best.

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Al G View Post
    Lew, using electric heat guns can be slow going for paint stripping but LPG gas torches are much quicker and the paint blisters without the wood underneath getting cooked so badly, in my limited experience. I've never seen professional house painters use anything else.

    Looking good Chris. I admire your dedication. All the best.
    I have never personally used torches mostly because a fair amount of my work has been aimed at areas that were slated to be varnished. It was not unusual to see torches in action on bottoms, but (anecdotal?) that seems to have become less common practice possibly due to yard restrictions?

    This video demonstrates the problem.





    No doubt a lot is up to the skill of user, but without a good touch there is the potential to do harm quickly. I have seen several propane systems that heat a pad, thereby avoiding the application of direct flame on the wood.

    Another issue with propane in a situation such as Chris is facing is the proximity of glass lights, windows, what have you. I think for house painting it may be fine, but I've only seen torching used on heavily overpainted bottoms. I never tried the torch myself but I have spent plenty of time with chemicals, sanding, heat and even dry scraping. I always find the material I am trying to remove (coupled with the substrate I'm working with) usually informs me as to what technique is best in each situation.

    The torch scares me!

    Edit to add: This guy in the video demonstrates lousy technique in every way, but he makes my point about as well as it could be made!
    Last edited by Lew Barrett; 08-31-2016 at 11:38 AM.
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

  30. #100
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    outdoors paint striping with torch is not easy either guys. hard to see the flame in bright sunlight. even slight wind makes it hard to keep the paint soft. no sun no wind is a good time. Late day early evening always works best, 2 hours at that time can be more productive then a whole day in the sun and wind. Or in your case Chris. since she's afloat. just work on the shady side if you aren't already doing that. then; ... turnerround!
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...58#post3996158

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    The torch scares me!

    Hell that torch scares me too!

    I'm thinking of something much smaller for detailed work. You are dead right about the risks. I just offered the suggestion as a quick method for churning through large areas, not as a superior method by any means.

    Cheers, Alex

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I've done the torch before as well, a very long time ago when I was too young to know better. It might work for some but seems to me that the phrase "playing with fire" does seem appropriate here. No, I'll try the chemicals again to see if they are better than the gun but no pyrotechnics thank you!

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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Yee haw!! No affiliation. And before you all start quoting me yes, I know the negativity of such a machine!
    Last edited by DeniseO30; 08-31-2016 at 07:58 PM.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...58#post3996158

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    Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    300

    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Damn, Denise. That looks like the business! I'll have to get rid of my flamethrower and up the anti.

  35. #105
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Juneau, Alaska
    Posts
    3,678

    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Lew Barrett View Post
    I have never personally used torches mostly because a fair amount of my work has been aimed at areas that were slated to be varnished. It was not unusual to see torches in action on bottoms, but (anecdotal?) that seems to have become less common practice possibly due to yard restrictions?

    This video demonstrates the problem.





    No doubt a lot is up to the skill of user, but without a good touch there is the potential to do harm quickly. I have seen several propane systems that heat a pad, thereby avoiding the application of direct flame on the wood.

    Another issue with propane in a situation such as Chris is facing is the proximity of glass lights, windows, what have you. I think for house painting it may be fine, but I've only seen torching used on heavily overpainted bottoms. I never tried the torch myself but I have spent plenty of time with chemicals, sanding, heat and even dry scraping. I always find the material I am trying to remove (coupled with the substrate I'm working with) usually informs me as to what technique is best in each situation.

    The torch scares me!

    Edit to add: This guy in the video demonstrates lousy technique in every way, but he makes my point about as well as it could be made!

    Why in the world would you use a weed burner?!?!?

    okay, okay I admit it. I use a torch to remove paint and I'm not sorry either. Heck, I might be doing myself a favor if I accidentally burn the whole mess down one day.
    -Jim

    Sucker for a pretty face.
    1934 27' Blanchard Cuiser ~ Amazon, Ex. Emalu
    19'6" Caledonia Yawl ~ Sparrow

    Getting into trouble one board at a time.

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