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Thread: Restoration of the BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

  1. #1751
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Yes, I know this is way too much work for basement storage shelves. Deck screws and 2x4s would be more the thing. Or brackets. But I'm working up my courage to start on the aft deck/cockpit project and thinking that there are any number of skills I will need for it that I do not have right now. Dimensioning rough lumber. Making tight, structurally sound joints. Precise cuts with hand saws, table saw and circular saw. To name just a few. I agree that a carpenter's bench is the traditional way to acquire these skills (or to perfect them at least) but I have a serviceable bench already. Sure, I'd like a nicer one but what I really need are the shelves.


    And less practically but perhaps more significantly, I am tired of always doing the expedient thing. Denise, you're right - shelf brackets would work great. Or even easier I could just buy metal storage shelving units. We have rows of them in the basement already for storing household items we don't use very often. But there is nothing satisfying about any of the practical options. Their sole merit is cost and time. Maybe I'm entering midlife crisis territory as I approach fifty (next year, not so far off), but merely saving money and time doesn't interest me very much any more. Why rush through the shelving project just to get to the other side of it? Yes, the list of projects on Petrel waits and one could argue that is a better place to spend my time, but on the other hand, time is really all we have. Why not enjoy all of it, at least as far as the demands of daily life, mortgage, bills, career, etc., etc., permit?


    It’s possible that I am just gilding the commode here but, as mundane as they may be, I would enjoy making a nice set of shelves. When I use them I will have the satisfaction of knowing that I took the time to do a really good job of it. And they will fit a certain aesthetic sense - they will belong in an old house that was similarly built by hand, with craftsmanship and skill.
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  2. #1752
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Ryden... I just saw Jim Ledger's bench thread from the link you posted. Thanks. Now I have major bench envy. And skills envy. I suspect that's it's clear to anyone who has followed this thread for any length of time that whatever talents I have do not lean towards wood working. At all. So I have to make up for that with patience and a certain acceptance for what I can accomplish now in the expectation that I will eventually be able to do a better job with more practice. But there are heights which I do not expect to ever reach, and that bench is certainly one of them.
    - Chris

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  3. #1753

    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    I noticed the router. That was the tool I used for the joints. And from the Sears Craftsman pamphlet "How to use your router. " I picked up the trick where you set the fence and roll the router into the wood for your mortice. This was long before the European plunge routers showed up. My 2x2 was just ripped 2x4. The funny thing about 2x4s I find they are cheaper than 1x4s or 2x2s ?! When you rip 2x4s you'll want to round over some edges. I used a quick and crude router table, a scrap of plywood which I routered out so the screws could reach the base of the router. A hole for the bit and a couple of 2x2 to span between the saw horses. For tenons you can gang them up by clamping your stock together ,adding scrap of wood for a fence and knocking them out .It's all good practice. Some where you are going to want a good mortice and tenon joint and you'll have mastered the skill. At least with the obnoxiously noisy and dusty router. I don't get to listen to jazz or classical music when I use them.

    Even 3/4" fir plywood needs some support besides just the ends. The one where I didn't use support has a sag on a 4' span.

    I now have four routers, the Sears Craftsman long ago wore out. Much too soon I thought. And the router table is part of the long wing of the Unisaw table saw and uses the Unifence.

    Using a router will save you from sharpening your chisels . On woodworking forum if you ask how to sharpen you'll get a thread longer than the " The Harbormaster Called. " and very heated. By far and away the best book is " The Complete Guide to Sharpening" by Leonard Lee. Much of the research was done at the National Research Council of Canada. They studied chisel edges with an electron microscope. Leonard Lee was the founder of Lee Valley tools.

    Have Fun
    Ray

  4. #1754
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Anyway, here's where I am with the shelf design:





    Posts are 4x4s ripped to 3" x 3". Sides are 2x4s ripped to 1-1/2" x 3". The shelves themselves will be 1" x 3" longitudinal slats ripped from 2x4s and supported every 2' by 1-1/2" x 2" cross pieces between the side rails. And yes, I know I'm making this project much harder than it needs to be...
    - Chris

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  5. #1755
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Chris, I'll commend you for identifying your priorities and sticking by them, and please don't take my suggestion as to what I'd do (and am doing) in your situation as a criticism for your decision to proceed with your plan! If it gives you satisfaction and the end result works just as well, not a thing wrong with it. I think we're just eager to get to the chapters titled "Cruises with Petrel" even though it's not our project.

  6. #1756

    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Oh, for cheap wood I look through the 2x4 pile at the lumberyard . HD buys from CanFor. Kiln dried SPF means spruce pine fir. The fir is Balsum (sp) fir, not hemlock or Douglas. Depending where the mill is hauling from you should get some pine, some pretty good pieces. The pine is waxy and kind of yellow. Avoid any with a dark bluish stain, that's beetle kill and it's very brittle. For cheap furniture grade wood

  7. #1757

    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Tenons are 1/3 width.

  8. #1758
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by schoonerjay View Post
    Chris, I'll commend you for identifying your priorities and sticking by them, and please don't take my suggestion as to what I'd do (and am doing) in your situation as a criticism for your decision to proceed with your plan! If it gives you satisfaction and the end result works just as well, not a thing wrong with it. I think we're just eager to get to the chapters titled "Cruises with Petrel" even though it's not our project.
    Thanks! I'm not taking anyone's comments as criticism at all. It's all valid and useful input. And I'm eager to get to the "cruises" part too. I just know that nothing I do is going to make that happen any sooner than next June or thereabouts. Which isn't as far away as all that but I don't need to rush through the work to get there either.
    - Chris

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  9. #1759
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Downwindtracker2 View Post
    I noticed the router. That was the tool I used for the joints. And from the Sears Craftsman pamphlet "How to use your router. " I picked up the trick where you set the fence and roll the router into the wood for your mortice. This was long before the European plunge routers showed up. My 2x2 was just ripped 2x4. The funny thing about 2x4s I find they are cheaper than 1x4s or 2x2s ?! When you rip 2x4s you'll want to round over some edges. I used a quick and crude router table, a scrap of plywood which I routered out so the screws could reach the base of the router. A hole for the bit and a couple of 2x2 to span between the saw horses. For tenons you can gang them up by clamping your stock together ,adding scrap of wood for a fence and knocking them out .It's all good practice. Some where you are going to want a good mortice and tenon joint and you'll have mastered the skill. At least with the obnoxiously noisy and dusty router. I don't get to listen to jazz or classical music when I use them.

    Even 3/4" fir plywood needs some support besides just the ends. The one where I didn't use support has a sag on a 4' span.

    I now have four routers, the Sears Craftsman long ago wore out. Much too soon I thought. And the router table is part of the long wing of the Unisaw table saw and uses the Unifence.

    Using a router will save you from sharpening your chisels . On woodworking forum if you ask how to sharpen you'll get a thread longer than the " The Harbormaster Called. " and very heated. By far and away the best book is " The Complete Guide to Sharpening" by Leonard Lee. Much of the research was done at the National Research Council of Canada. They studied chisel edges with an electron microscope. Leonard Lee was the founder of Lee Valley tools.

    Have Fun
    Ray
    Quote Originally Posted by Downwindtracker2 View Post
    Oh, for cheap wood I look through the 2x4 pile at the lumberyard . HD buys from CanFor. Kiln dried SPF means spruce pine fir. The fir is Balsum (sp) fir, not hemlock or Douglas. Depending where the mill is hauling from you should get some pine, some pretty good pieces. The pine is waxy and kind of yellow. Avoid any with a dark bluish stain, that's beetle kill and it's very brittle. For cheap furniture grade wood
    Quote Originally Posted by Downwindtracker2 View Post
    Tenons are 1/3 width.

    Thanks Ray. Good info. Especially the tenon dimensions. I did know from my various Google searches on the topic that 1/3 width is typical, but on a 1-1/2" beam that makes the tenon 1/2" thick which seemed kinda small to me for a shelf that may need to support some heavy stuff. So I cheated and drew them as 3/4" wide. Too much? Would 1/2" be strong enough?
    - Chris

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  10. #1760

    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Mortice and tenon joints are incredibly strong, I saw a vid where they dropped an anvil on some frames ,only the mortice and tenon survived . My old shelves are much like you want to build . They are over 35 years old, now. 40" x24" but the shelves are 22" high, allowing me to double up. It gets toolboxes, totes with books, screws, hardware. If I can lift it, it goes on. The patternmaker's toolchest is a real struggle. So I guess you can say 1/2" is enough.

    A hint, if you get the clear plastic totes instead of the Rubbermaid bins, you can see what's in them. Taped on tags fall off the Rubbermaid bins after a while. With my aging memory I have to pull them out to see what's in the Rubbermaid bins now.

  11. #1761
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Downwindtracker2 View Post
    Mortice and tenon joints are incredibly strong, I saw a vid where they dropped an anvil on some frames ,only the mortice and tenon survived . My old shelves are much like you want to build . They are over 35 years old, now. 40" x24" but the shelves are 22" high, allowing me to double up. It gets toolboxes, totes with books, screws, hardware. If I can lift it, it goes on. The patternmaker's toolchest is a real struggle. So I guess you can say 1/2" is enough.

    A hint, if you get the clear plastic totes instead of the Rubbermaid bins, you can see what's in them. Taped on tags fall off the Rubbermaid bins after a while. With my aging memory I have to pull them out to see what's in the Rubbermaid bins now.
    1/2" tenons it is then. And as for the Rubbermaid bins... now I'm trying to figure out where you saw those because my previous workshop disaster photo only has a couple. But it's true. I used Rubbermaid bins for everything way back in my twenties when I was racing motorcycles, because they were tough and I was hauling them around and in and out of my truck every weekend so they needed to take some abuse. But the damned things are indestructible! I've had some of them for 25 years now and I just can't get rid of them. And everything you say is spot on. Every time I want to find something I have to go through ten bins to find it. I'm slowly replacing them with clear totes, which do make things much easier to find. But the clear ones break if I look at them crosseyed. Bleah.
    - Chris

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  12. #1762
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    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    1/2" tenons it is then. And as for the Rubbermaid bins... now I'm trying to figure out where you saw those because my previous workshop disaster photo only has a couple. But it's true. I used Rubbermaid bins for everything way back in my twenties when I was racing motorcycles, because they were tough and I was hauling them around and in and out of my truck every weekend so they needed to take some abuse. But the damned things are indestructible! I've had some of them for 25 years now and I just can't get rid of them. And everything you say is spot on. Every time I want to find something I have to go through ten bins to find it. I'm slowly replacing them with clear totes, which do make things much easier to find. But the clear ones break if I look at them crosseyed. Bleah.
    Hey Chris congratulations on biting the bullet and getting into woodworking!

    The width of your shelves may sag a bit, I use the old rule of thumb 2x3, 3ft. 2x4 4ft and so on, -+ 25%


    I love making stuff with mortise and tenon's especially doors,

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    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  13. #1763
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Hey Chris congratulations on biting the bullet and getting into woodworking!

    The width of your shelves may sag a bit, I use the old rule of thumb 2x3, 3ft. 2x4 4ft and so on, -+ 25%


    I love making stuff with mortise and tenon's especially doors,

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Thanks Denise. Are you saying that the 3" x 1-1/2" sides are not strong enough given the 66" span? Yes, I can see that might be a problem. And I may need to make the shelves shorter to fit around some posts where I want to put them in any case. I have approximately 12' of wall to use so I was thinking two 6' units would be ideal. But three 4' units might be better. More work but stronger and I think it they would fit better as well. I'll need to measure to confirm.
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  14. #1764
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    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Thanks Denise. Are you saying that the 3" x 1-1/2" sides are not strong enough given the 66" span? Yes, I can see that might be a problem. And I may need to make the shelves shorter to fit around some posts where I want to put them in any case. I have approximately 12' of wall to use so I was thinking two 6' units would be ideal. But three 4' units might be better. More work but stronger and I think it they would fit better as well. I'll need to measure to confirm.
    I'm sure you will deal with it Chris,
    Check out..... The...... Sagulator! http://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/. 😀



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  15. #1765
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Excellent calculator!

    I don't see a place to enter how old I am though...
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  16. #1766
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    I'm sure you will deal with it Chris,
    Check out..... The...... Sagulator! http://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/. 



    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Nice! Putting in all my numbers and assuming Douglas Fir for the wood it says that the sag would be "acceptable" at a 66" span, but I still think 4' units might be better.
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  17. #1767
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    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Nice! Putting in all my numbers and assuming Douglas Fir for the wood it says that the sag would be "acceptable" at a 66" span, but I still think 4' units might be better.
    Here ya go Chris although it seems to be more about the router jig he built.


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    Last edited by DeniseO30; 11-07-2017 at 09:32 PM.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  18. #1768
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    ^^^^ I saw video that when I was looking for example shelves for design ideas. That guy has a few different shelf projects online. I didn't find anything quite like what I have in mind though. And I may be adjusting my design a bit to work with the wood I bought in any case. But first, another tool purchase, this time a craigslist find:



    Nothing particularly fancy - it's Taiwan-made circa 1979, but it's in good condition and will be very useful for many things. I'm a bit surprised that I made it this long without ever owning a drill press given how often I find that I need one. Much dependency on the kindness of strangers with tools I guess. The joke is on me though. I completely misjudged the size of it from the photo - I thought I was buying a little portable unit, the sort of thing I could take down to the boat if needed. But no - this thing is big. And heavy. Really heavy. No-chance-that-I-can-get-it-out-of-the-pickup-truck heavy, at least not without the help of someone a lot larger than my wife. So there it sits under a cover until tomorrow at least. The larger size will be more useful for the things I really need it for though, so that's ok then.

    Then I spent some time this evening digging through the stacks at the nearest Home Depot in search of wood for the shelf project. The selection of 2x4s was miserable. Not even worth the effort to comb through the pile. But they had DF 4x4s that weren't too bad so I picked up a few.





    Not boat lumber, but I hope they will make decent shelves. I'm making even more work for myself by starting with 4x4s instead of smaller lumber and I may need to tweak the design a bit, but I think it will work out ok in the end. However I do have one concern. The wood is green and quite wet to the touch. I assume I should let it dry before working with it, but how for long? If I use it as-is will my shelves twist, bend and distort as the wood dries? I'm not going to air dry it for the requisite 3+ years based on the various articles I get from an internet search. That would be taking my quality-over-expediency philosophy farther than even I care to go. Any suggestions?
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  19. #1769
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Regarding twist,it will be worse if the material isn't restrained by joinery or proper storage,using stickers and weight.
    To my eye,the only one to be concerned about has the heart in it.
    Top row 2nd from the left
    If you plan well and get it together quickly,you can make existing bows cancel each other.
    Definitely joint them all on two adjacent faces before you plane.

    I would say that 1/2" mortise and tenon will be a bit thin in 1 1/2" material and pretty easy to break off sideways,during assembly,just from the weight of itself.
    Also,why use 1 1/2" material when you will cut 2/3 of it off?
    Aside from the sag,you would be better to use 1x4 and not cut it down.
    Assuming of course, that you weren't planning to land the tenon on a shoulder in the post.

    I would probably arrange things so that the front of the shelf supports(I want to call them girts) are set back from the fronts of the posts,by an 1" or so,so the shelves can have a bit of front overhang,without sticking past the posts.

    You might also consider offsetting the end pieces (the front-to-back bits) upwards a couple of inches,so that all the cut fibres from the mortises aren't in one plane.
    Sleep with one eye open.

  20. #1770
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    Regarding twist,it will be worse if the material isn't restrained by joinery or proper storage,using stickers and weight.
    To my eye,the only one to be concerned about has the heart in it.
    Top row 2nd from the left
    If you plan well and get it together quickly,you can make existing bows cancel each other.
    Definitely joint them all on two adjacent faces before you plane.

    I would say that 1/2" mortise and tenon will be a bit thin in 1 1/2" material and pretty easy to break off sideways,during assembly,just from the weight of itself.
    Also,why use 1 1/2" material when you will cut 2/3 of it off?
    Aside from the sag,you would be better to use 1x4 and not cut it down.
    Assuming of course, that you weren't planning to land the tenon on a shoulder in the post.

    I would probably arrange things so that the front of the shelf supports(I want to call them girts) are set back from the fronts of the posts,by an 1" or so,so the shelves can have a bit of front overhang,without sticking past the posts.

    You might also consider offsetting the end pieces (the front-to-back bits) upwards a couple of inches,so that all the cut fibres from the mortises aren't in one plane.
    They are better looking 4x4s then they have out this way Chris.





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  21. #1771
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    Regarding twist,it will be worse if the material isn't restrained by joinery or proper storage,using stickers and weight.
    To my eye,the only one to be concerned about has the heart in it.
    Top row 2nd from the left
    If you plan well and get it together quickly,you can make existing bows cancel each other.
    Definitely joint them all on two adjacent faces before you plane.

    I would say that 1/2" mortise and tenon will be a bit thin in 1 1/2" material and pretty easy to break off sideways,during assembly,just from the weight of itself.
    Also,why use 1 1/2" material when you will cut 2/3 of it off?
    Aside from the sag,you would be better to use 1x4 and not cut it down.
    Assuming of course, that you weren't planning to land the tenon on a shoulder in the post.

    I would probably arrange things so that the front of the shelf supports(I want to call them girts) are set back from the fronts of the posts,by an 1" or so,so the shelves can have a bit of front overhang,without sticking past the posts.

    You might also consider offsetting the end pieces (the front-to-back bits) upwards a couple of inches,so that all the cut fibres from the mortises aren't in one plane.

    Thanks Ron I tried to pick pieces with no heartwood but that one slipped through. Oh well. I think I can use part of it at least. And as for the tenon dimensions... yes, I did some more research there and it sounds like the 1/3 rule is used when joining material of equal dimensions. That makes sense since a wider tenon would reduce the amount of material around the mortise. But when joining pieces of different dimensions the mortise can be up to 1/2 the width of the smaller piece and 1/3 the width of the larger piece.

    And... after looking at the space I have for the shelves I'm thinking I need to make one six-foot long unit. The problem is that the wall is built around a row of posts that land on concrete pads which the shelves would have to go around. So my options are three three-foot units (or a six-foot and a three-foot) or to make some accommodation for the pads in the leg spacing and the lowest shelf. Which would make things a lot more complicated. And I don't think I need that much shelf space in the workshop, so one six-foot unit should be fine. I can use the remaining space for the drill press, which can go against the wall when it's not in use.

    (Denise, I think after playing with the sagulator and looking at some examples of six-foot workbench designs that the amount of sag will be minimal).

    Finally, I think that with the wood I have I can use the full 3-1/2" dimension rather than milling everything down to 3". So the cut schedule looks like.

    Posts x 4: 3-1/2" x 3-1/2" x 63" (4 4x4s)
    Rails x 8: 3-1/2" x 1-1/2" x 72" (4 4x4s)
    Sides and cross braces x 16: 3-1/2" x 1-1/2" x 24" (off-cuts from the rails and posts)
    Shelf slats x 28 (7 per shelf): 3" x 3/4" x 72" (7 4x4s, ripping 4 slats from each 4x4)

    So I need 15 4x4s and I have 16, with one questionable. And I expect I will have quite a bit of waste from mistakes, cutting around defects and similar issues so I should pick up a few more just in case.
    Last edited by cstevens; 11-08-2017 at 12:09 PM.
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  22. #1772

    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Looking at the end grain, some are boat lumber. And orange too. When you see good lumber buy it. Save those ones for a boat. Lumberyards bundles vary greatly. I remember a bundle of 1x3 that was almost all furniture grade pine. In fact , I made a IKEA style shelving unit from it, it's sitting beside me as I type. Another bundle of landscape ties, no less, I had to go through the whole bundle to get the 40 I needed. Ugh. With those 4x4s I wouldn't waste them on shelves, rather legs and stretchers for a Workbench ! Yes, that will give you a chance to chop mortices, saw tenons and then draw pin them. Tops can be had already made up of hard maple.

    My bench is old school one, 5" square. After using it these thirty years, I think Paul Sellers got benches right. Look up him up on Youtube, And partically his series on mortice and tenon and benches.

    For you storage shelves 48" is a good use of plywood. Don't use particle board , it only adds weight and no strength. It's referred to as termite barf.

    Those old Taiwanese drill presses are much better than the current Chinese version. Gawd they are bad.

  23. #1773
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    Quote Originally Posted by Downwindtracker2 View Post
    Looking at the end grain, some are boat lumber. And orange too. When you see good lumber buy it. Save those ones for a boat. Lumberyards bundles vary greatly. I remember a bundle of 1x3 that was almost all furniture grade pine. In fact , I made a IKEA style shelving unit from it, it's sitting beside me as I type. Another bundle of landscape ties, no less, I had to go through the whole bundle to get the 40 I needed. Ugh. With those 4x4s I wouldn't waste them on shelves, rather legs and stretchers for a Workbench ! Yes, that will give you a chance to chop mortices, saw tenons and then draw pin them. Tops can be had already made up of hard maple.

    My bench is old school one, 5" square. After using it these thirty years, I think Paul Sellers got benches right. Look up him up on Youtube, And partically his series on mortice and tenon and benches.

    For you storage shelves 48" is a good use of plywood. Don't use particle board , it only adds weight and no strength. It's referred to as termite barf.

    Those old Taiwanese drill presses are much better than the current Chinese version. Gawd they are bad.
    Let's not get started on bench building my roubo design is 3 years old and I'm Still Loving It


    Chris you could try all mortise and make inserts since cutting the tenons is the most time-consuming. Or, you could use one of these newfangled machines. http://www.rockler.com/beadlockreg-t...gaAqqbEALw_wcB

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  24. #1774
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    image.jpg


    image.jpg

    Consider cutting tenon shoulders on only the face,and top and bottom edges.
    It makes fitting much easier since you only need to trim the back( smooth side) and you can use a regular plane instead of a chisel or rabbet plane,on cross grain.
    The front setback,second pic,is also much easier accomplish than trying to get it all flush at the front.


    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  25. #1775
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Downwind, some good thoughts there - thanks! You're right, plywood might be better for shelves. I have some birch ply already that would be perfect although I will need another sheet to make all of the shelves. That would reduce the size of the project considerably over ripping shelf slats from the 4x4s. So that's a plan then. But I still think I'll use this lumber for the shelves. It's nice but not too nice, and I'd rather work this this than fight with lower quality stuff. And at $1.25/lf vs $7.50/lf for CVG DF 4x4s I'm already saving a lot on the materials costs.

    As for a bench (and Denise, I do love yours), sure - that would be a worthwhile project. But I have a serviceable (although very old) bench right now.



    Replacing it is pretty low on my list of priorities. Somewhere after shelves, painting Petrel, the aft deck project, about a million house projects, restoring an old model Lightning pond sailboat for Dash (he's been asking me about it), more house projects, rebuilding the carburetor for Lucky Truck, refinishing the whitehall, even more house projects, building a kayak rack, restoring the Davidson dinghy... The list goes on. And on.
    - Chris

    https://fvpetrel.wordpress.com

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  26. #1776
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Ron, thanks for the photos. I like the setback. Definitely easier, and I think it will look better as well. Setback it is.
    - Chris

    https://fvpetrel.wordpress.com

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  27. #1777

    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    You are right about bench debates, they are as bad as sharpening ones. I'm a Canuck, like the English, our feelings about benches are coloured by Record vises . I have three #52s in my shop and a old big #52 1/2 to restore. Now if I could find a patternmakers vise......

    Slap a vise on something solid, but make it tall.

  28. #1778
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    Downwind, some good thoughts there - thanks! You're right, plywood might be better for shelves. I have some birch ply already that would be perfect although I will need another sheet to make all of the shelves. That would reduce the size of the project considerably over ripping shelf slats from the 4x4s. So that's a plan then. But I still think I'll use this lumber for the shelves. It's nice but not too nice, and I'd rather work this this than fight with lower quality stuff. And at $1.25/lf vs $7.50/lf for CVG DF 4x4s I'm already saving a lot on the materials costs.

    As for a bench (and Denise, I do love yours), sure - that would be a worthwhile project. But I have a serviceable (although very old) bench right now.



    Replacing it is pretty low on my list of priorities. Somewhere after shelves, painting Petrel, the aft deck project, about a million house projects, restoring an old model Lightning pond sailboat for Dash (he's been asking me about it), more house projects, rebuilding the carburetor for Lucky Truck, refinishing the whitehall, even more house projects, building a kayak rack, restoring the Davidson dinghy... The list goes on. And on.
    Wow! don't replace that bench Chris! It's beautiful!

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  29. #1779
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Wow! don't replace that bench Chris! It's beautiful!

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Thanks Denise That was a craigslist find earlier this year. Along with a matching kid's-height bench for Dash...



    Dash and I used his bench for a couple of projects over the summer but I haven't had a chance to use mine yet. Looking forward to it though.
    - Chris

    https://fvpetrel.wordpress.com

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  30. #1780
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Those must be old photos. No way a bench stays looking like that for more than a day or so.

  31. #1781
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Those must be old photos. No way a bench stays looking like that for more than a day or so.
    Yup, it's 3yrs old Phil. Right now it's completely covered with so much stuff I may never see the top again in this lifetime lol

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  32. #1782
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    Yup. My photos are old too FWIW. Both benches are buried under tools and projects now.
    - Chris

    https://fvpetrel.wordpress.com

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  33. #1783
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Yup, it's 3yrs old Phil. Right now it's completely covered with so much stuff I may never see the top again in this lifetime lol

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Tail Vise, & dogs imho indispensable!

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  34. #1784
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    Default Re: Restoration of BC Salmon Troller "Petrel"

    ^^^ beautiful work Denise!
    - Chris

    https://fvpetrel.wordpress.com

    Life is short. Go boating now!

  35. #1785
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cstevens View Post
    ^^^ beautiful work Denise!
    Thanks Chris, I felt somewhat compelled to show a mess LOL gotta keep Phil happy!

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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