Page 9 of 9 FirstFirst ... 89
Results 281 to 294 of 294

Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #281
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Kilmelford
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian, It's good to see how you're getting on and to compare the decisions you've been making about the interior etcetera.

    I've also been getting on with my Kotik, which will be called Mariota after the Queen of the Western Isles c 1380, wife of Donald the Lord of the Isles.

    I decided early on to abandon the idea of a self-draining, unsinkable ship for several reasons. In a hull of this shape you have to watch out for water coming in to the cockpit when you're heeled, either by raising the sole or by sloping the front faces of the seats to bring the deepest part inboard. As a result of the raised sole the seats will be at quite a high level and I prefer to sit well out of the wind, which is very cold here in Argyll.

    Have a look at Albert Strange on self-draining cockpits, as he makes a lot of sense. If you get a big sea into one the ship becomes instantly top heavy, until it drains out, unless you have very big drains. If it drained right down into the cabin you would be very stable but of course very wet in your living area, so I've compromised and not installed limber holes.

    I've built a good sized bridge deck quite high up, to keep water out of the cabin as much as possible, also envisage normal sailing with a washboard or two installed.

    The bulkhead at Station Three is water-tight up to a couple of feet, i.e. again no limber holes.

    I want quite a bit of storage space, so have left the area under the stern deck accessible.

    In a wee boat like this I think it's a mistake to have too many berths. There's a main berth to starboard with storage underneath and a possible second one under the foredeck to port. I don't expect ever to have a third person sleeping aboard but it would be possible simply on the cabin sole to port, which is basically open. Of course with the self draining cockpit you get two quarter berths if you want, at the expense of losing storage in the cockpit.

    At the forward end of the cabin to port is space for the sardine stove, which with luck may arrive in my lifetime.

    I've added a couple of photos taken from the forward end. In the front of the first one is the mast post, made from a beam salvaged from the Ardrishaig distillery that came down about thirty years ago. The deck beams are also made from this old growth pitch pine, which is lovely stuff that lasts for ever. It will end up oiled to give a nice finish.

    quot homines tot sententiae!

    Ewan
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Ewan G Kennedy

  2. #282
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rushworth Australia
    Posts
    2,626

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian , you’re doing such a speedy job compared to my fumbling. I expect you will over take me sometime soon.
    Just on the winch for centreboard, I have found one that is used for things like a manual fork-lift which has a brake inside it so when weight is on the line it doesn’t turn. Looks like a boat trailer winch. If I rememeber I‘ll Put a picture on my thread.
    On another Grey Seal that I saw pictures of was the most ingenious setup I’ve seen to date. Ill try to explain it.
    Over the top of centreboard was a tube about 1 1/2” diameter in the for/aft orientation that ran in plain bearings of some sort and the hoist line was wrapped around it. That tube went through the #6 bulkhead to under the bridge deck and had a large wheel attached that had a line turning it from the cockpit. So simple and enclosed. Sort of a drum winch.

  3. #283
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    2,205

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!



    Marianita has twin bilge boards, each one has a small worm-drive winch much like this one, rated for 1500lbs/700kg more importantly the drum stays where it is when you stop cranking. My metric to inches conversion is weak, they are about 6"x6"x4". Not terribly fast up and down but the speed isn't much of a factor when out sailing, I did try a battery operated drill with a socket last summer, that turned out to be a very slick way to go. I don't remember if I pointed them out to Ian when he was aboard in Port Townsend last September.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  4. #284
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rushworth Australia
    Posts
    2,626

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Yes that looks very similar to mine Steve. Does your handle go on side of winch or top?

    64E72F22-2525-419E-ABBF-C4A28C4E627C.jpg

    I can see a few skinned knees going in/out companionway.

  5. #285
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    310

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Two days later, the filleting is done, as far as possible for now. It's good to have that little chore out of the way.


    Ewan, You're doing very well too.

    I like the idea of using one of those historical local names for your boat. (I used to be in the Gaelic Society here, but it is not going any more.)

    Thanks for all your thoughts. I take your point about a serious pooping keeping the boat stable if it goes into the bottom of the boat, but I still prefer a self-draining cockpit, or semi-self-draining anyway, with storage space under the sole, with buoyancy as a bonus. I drained my Eun na Mara Islesburgh's cockpit straight into the motor well, with a removable plug. Sometimes it was a good way to catch rain water during the night. If we had ever got a serious wave over the side I could have quickly pulled the plug out. I had sloped the cockpit sole towards the stern, and we kept the plug in when using the boat as the sole there was only a little above the waterline and with the plug out it scooped up water when launching the boat off the trailer. Even with the plug in, water would not come higher than the motor well. Not for very long anyway. The Kotik sole will have more clearance at the stern.





    Don't worry, we did some good trips and we watched the weather forecasts carefully. I had an electric bilge pump in the bottom of the boat just behind the cabin bulkhead (with limber holes) but the pump never got water anywhere near it. I will use the same system in my Kotik. (Sorry, Travis - "Zuri".) I will have a look at hand bilge pumps, and carry a bucket. There will be a sub-deck in the stern at motor-mount level, for buoyancy, and closed storage space above that.

    I have raised the companionway sill 75mm (3"), and moved the seats closer together at the forward end, but they are still the same height, which is 150mm (6") below the sheer at the cabin bulkhead. I expect to be lowering the motor mounting 50mm (2"). The motor dotted in on the plans is significantly smaller than the one I will be using.

    I never intend to sleep three people on board. The quarter berth is just to provide an option for us oldies. The "trotter box" will be mainly for throwing things into.

    A "Sardine" wood-burning stove will be nice to have.

    Vendia Planking! Pitch pine! I'm jealous!

    I wasn't very good at Latin at school so I looked up your quote. Yes, very true. I have been acquainted with several Eun na Maras in Australia, Canada and at Port Townsend, and they are built from the same plans but they all come out with different details. I see on your blog that you have one in your group too.

    'Bye for now.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  6. #286
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    310

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Andrew and Steve,

    Yes, I'm having a fairly good run at the Kotik-building just now, thanks, Andrew.
    Thanks for your suggestions about winches. That one you found looks as if it will work well mounted on the side of the top part of your c/case, and I like that other arrangement too. I can see how it could work on Kotik.

    Thanks for your winch picture too, Steve. No, we didn't study your winches in September, but I took a photo of one from the pontoon when you weren't there (and some other details). That looks very neat.


    I liked being able to operate our Eun na Mara drum-winches from the cockpit, by lines through the bulkhead. Here is the system my friend Bob Lewis made for his centreboard-version Eun na Mara Morna, that we went to the launching of in Portland Australia in May 2015, and I sailed with him at Canberra in April 2016. This is inside the bridge deck.


    You can see more of this on http://www.geoss.com.au/eun_mara/bob...ard_suspension, and the winches for my Islesburgh on ​the same site http://www.geoss.com.au/eun_mara/ian_dunedin3.htm (This is Richard Almond's website.)

    Time for bed.
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 11-27-2017 at 06:21 PM. Reason: spelling
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #287
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    2,205

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!



    This is the port side winch and the "tower" I built to keep water out. The tops the bilgeboard trunks are only a couple of inches above the DWL so when the boat heels over water floods into the tower, draining back out on the other tack. But that shouldn't be an issue with a centerboard. With my long push/pull tiller I can sail with one hand and work the boards with the other if I feel the need, but generally they get lowered to start the day and raised at the end.

    If one wanted to get particularly clever a small electric motor could be fitted.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  8. #288
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Everett, WA, USA
    Posts
    433

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post







    Don't worry, we did some good trips and we watched the weather forecasts carefully. I had an electric bilge pump in the bottom of the boat just behind the cabin bulkhead (with limber holes) but the pump never got water anywhere near it. I will use the same system in my Kotik. (Sorry, Travis - "Zuri".) I will have a look at hand bilge pumps, and carry a bucket. There will be a sub-deck in the stern at motor-mount level, for buoyancy, and closed storage space above that.


    Ian
    You mean the outboard or scuppers? Either way, I'd do the same if I were building a Kotik. Yours is looking fantastic and this is a great stage to be at. It's nice to see the bulkheads in place and the interior starting to take shape. Keep up the good work.

    Travis.

  9. #289
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    310

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Travis.

  10. #290
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Kilmelford
    Posts
    71

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian

    Thanks for your comments and sorry I've not been on here for a while.

    It's fascinating how different people go about the same problems and of course any wee cruising boat is going to be full of compromises. I will need a cockpit cover and am installing a pump in the cockpit, draining into the motor well.

    I'm lucky to have a brand new two stroke outboard that I bought about twenty years ago and never used on Stroma, as it didn't seem polite to expose an old lady to such indignity and I enjoyed the strange spots we had to anchor in when we ran out of wind and daylight. It's much lighter than the new four strokes, which I couldn't comfortably lift into place and won't get enough use to damage the environment too much.

    All the best

    Ewan
    Ewan G Kennedy

  11. #291
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    310

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ewan,

    My statement that I will "use the same system in my Kotik" is perhaps not very clear. I will drain the cockpit into the motor well, but will not have an electric bilge pump. I will see if I can find a hand-operated pump of decent capacity, in addition to the usual bucket.

    Cruising on the West Coast of Scotland would be fascinating. A picture of Stroma, please!

    What is the make, h.p. and weight of your motor? I picked up my motor last Friday. It's a 4 stroke, and certainly bigger than the one Iain has dotted in on the plans, which was also the case with my Eun na Mara, Islesburgh, with the earlier model of the same motor.It's an Evinrude/Tohatsu 6 h.p. and weighs 25 kg., which is as much as I want to lift and not any more often than I have to. More about that later.

    While waiting for my motor, I went on with the framing in the forward cabin and the "saloon". I hadn't been too sure how I was going to do it, so I just let it evolve. Some bits are Oregon (Douglas fir) and some are macrocarpa. Here are some piccies:

    Starboard side, "settee" and walkway.


    Climbing in and out is much easier now. This is a piece of construction plywood left over from re-decking my common or garden trailer about five years ago.


    Port side, centreboard case and quarter-berth.


    The forward cabin, using some plywood off-cuts.


    Rail to support forward bunk. There will be another bulkhead along the nearer part of the diagonal, and a removable infill panel to make a double.


    Thinking about the cockpit again. I am using stainless steel screws for dry assemblies and to hold the framing together while the glue sets, and leaving them in. These seat-rails and the bulkheads at Stations 7 and 8 are not glued in yet.


    I can continue working on the stern now.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-05-2017 at 03:07 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  12. #292
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Schleswig Holstein Germany
    Posts
    501

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Nice progress Ian.
    And good inspirations for me too ;-)

    Max

  13. #293
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rushworth Australia
    Posts
    2,626

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Good work Ian , now slow down you’re showing me up.

  14. #294
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    310

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Max. Glad it might inspire you. I want to keep the interior pretty simple.
    And thanks Andrew. I'm theoretically full-time on Kotik, but there are always plenty of interruptions, so I have to make progress when I can.

    I had a big glue-up of all the framing battens on the back of the motor bulkhead (stn 8) the other night and have glued bulkheads 7 and 8 in now.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •