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Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #246
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    269

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Here is the current state of the play. The interior still looks like this:


    After assembling the centreboard, I shaped the sides on the bench, then propped it up to shape the edges. It weighs about 40kg.


    I coated the board with epoxy, one side at a time, and rigged a tent to help the resin set in this frosty weather. It was set enough to turn over after a couple of hours. Then I did the same with fairing filler. I took this photo this morning, before I took the tent apart.


    Then I sanded both sides flat with my belt sander. It needs a bit more fairing yet.


    I picked up the rudder fittings and chain plates from the foundry today. They are cast from aluminium bronze (AB2) which looks more yellow than silicon bronze. I asked for them not to be polished smooth and shiny. I will scrub them up a bit with a flap-disc on my angle grinder, and paint them.


    When I was making the patterns I drilled the holes in the gudgeons and assembled the parts on the sternpost, for a sneak preview. Then I filled in the holes again. The sternpost will have to be shaped a little more to fit the castings.


    I have to tear myself away from the boatbuilding for a few weeks now, but don't worry, I'll be back!
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  2. #247
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Sweden,Scilly Isles, Siberia
    Posts
    7,719

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Nice castings Ian. I confess i only like bronze once its gone green......a certain J class yacht put me off polishing bronze, its a bit like varnish.....you can have too much of it.......id rather be sailing.

  3. #248
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rushworth Australia
    Posts
    2,500

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Have a good break Ian, you've been working pretty hard. Looks good.

  4. #249
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    269

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Ian and Andrew.
    I'm not a great fan for maintaining lots of bright shiny stuff either. I think the brightwork will be either Deks Olje or Sikkens Cetol, when I get that far.
    Right now, it will be good to have a break.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  5. #250
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    269

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Well, we had a good break, thanks. We've been back for a couple of weeks but there have been a few things to catch up on, as is to be expected. I have been fiddling around a bit with the centreboard and it's nearly ready to paint, so it will be good to get that out of the way. Then the plan is to fillet the laps and fill the gaps under the frames, then fibreglass the inside of the planking, then fillet the frames to the planking. As I've said before, fibreglassing is not a normal part of the glued clinker method or Iain's specifications, but I'm just doing it because I couldn't get the 7-ply I wanted.
    I have been writing a report on our trip, which I am putting on the People and Places section, called "Raid Pomerania 2017". It was a very good trip.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  6. #251
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    269

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Last week I was figuring out how to sling up the centreboard and lower it into the case, so I've got a good enough system now. The board is too heavy at 45kg (100 lb) just to pick it up and drop it in. These photos were taken on different days, but show the effect.

    Here is the board slung up at its balance point, by a thin webbing strap, using a 3-part tackle hooked onto a line stretched along the overhead beam, so I can drag it across to above the c/case.


    Here's how it ends up underneath. (I filled in the pivot hole and redrilled it about 9mm (3/8") nearer the top of the board to give it a bit more
    clearance at the front. The bearing is epoxy with high density filler.


    And this is the top view.


    I put a couple of layers of fibreglass tape around the bottom corner.


    The temperature is usually 4 - 8 degrees Celsius (40 - 50 F) in the workshop these days, so I'm using fan heaters where I can.


    This is the first coat of primer/undercoat. The second coat went on today. Three coats of antifouling to go.


    Between coats of paint, I am marking a line around the inside of the hull, 45mm (1 3/4 ") below the top of the centreboard case, to locate the bunk-top framing. The lines will show up better on the bare wood than on fibreglass.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #252
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Mountain lakes of Vermont
    Posts
    9,272

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    The boat is looking fine. I, too, am intrigued by that centerboard arrangement. Hard for the pivot hole to leak if it's outside the boat!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  8. #253
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    269

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Rich.
    Progress has been in fits and starts lately, with plenty of interruptions.
    Here's a shot of the centreboard, which was meant to be the final installation, but I think I'm going to pull it out again and move the pivot hole to have the board sitting a bit higher in the case. There is enough room in the top of the case.


    I carefully levelled the boat, using the top of the case as a reference. Then I marked a position 45mm (1 3/4") above the waterline on each of the mould patterns I had made from the lofting, and used them to mark that point at each station line.


    Then I used my cheapo laser to connect the dots, right around the boat. The line marks the top of the bunk framing.


    The laser's tripod was too tall for this job, so my wife let me use this clever device from her collection.


    It's all made out of one piece. Amazing!


    After filling all the gaps under the frames and filleting the seams, I hand-sanded the whole hull with 60 grit paper. Then I made newspaper patterns for the pieces of 10 oz. woven rovings I am going to fibreglass the bottom with, up to the bunk framing line. (The pencil line is a bit faint. I inked it in later.) The 'glass won't follow the kinks of the plank seams very well, so I'll just cut it where I have to. The same patterns fit both sides, and I'll do one side at a time. Above the line I'll use the same 6 oz. cloth I used for the outside of the planks.


    Until next time...

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

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