Page 21 of 21 FirstFirst ... 112021
Results 701 to 713 of 713

Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #701
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia, Australia
    Posts
    1,954

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Ian, pure delight!

    So happy for you.

    Regards,
    John.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  2. #702
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Providence,RI USA
    Posts
    72

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Absolutely lovely! That's a lot of marlinspike seamanship going on on that boat. Great job!

    Hope you have many fine and adventurous day this summer.

    Mike

  3. #703
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    617

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, John and Mike. You're both impressive workers too.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  4. #704
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Europe
    Posts
    11,080

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Just great Ian. Where was that you put in? Minus 5 and snow on way, your summer about to start, need some good photos to get through a cold dark winter!

  5. #705
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Between Bourgeoisie and Proletariat - Australia
    Posts
    4,110

    Default

    That is such a delight!
    Well done Ian.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  6. #706
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    225

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Many great summers coming up. You’ve done exceptionally well Ian and in double quick time too.

  7. #707
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    617

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Ian. Good to hear from you. That boat ramp is the one at the Otematata Boat Harbour at the head of Lake Aviemore, below the Benmore dam. You probably know it. We had come over the Lindis Pass from Wanaka to see the annual "Aviemore Classic" trailer yacht racing, which we have enjoyed socially in the past, although not serious racers. We didn't launch on the race days this time as the weather was bad and a lot of the yachts took a hammering, but we launched on the Monday morning (our Labour Day) when it was calm.
    Thanks also, Gypsie and Andrew.
    Since then we have been to the annual Canterbury Classic Boats regatta at Akaroa, (which is the same bunch of people we saw last March at Lake Hood) but we didn't launch there either as we were not rigged in time, the weather was bad, and the ramp was unsuitable for Kotik. We have managed it in the past with Islesburgh, but Kotik is deeper and heavier. From there we drove north to Lake Rotoiti (Nelson Lakes), where we camped in the boat for four more nights, rigged her last Friday (the only day it wasn't raining), and "sailed" her on Saturday, in the rain, with no wind. On Sunday we unrigged her and came to Picton, which is the southern terminal of the Cook Strait ferries, staying at a motor camp so far. So far here we have raised the tow-ball of the coupling, shortened the boom (as it was hitting the VHF aerial!), and made a few more minor improvements. We have also been sleeping in the boat for this whole trip so far, so the living arrangements are gradually falling into shape. Tomorrow we will put Kotik into the Waikawa Bay marina and live on her there for the next couple of weeks, and sail her as much as we can to get to know how she behaves. We have a friend in Picton who is helping us too, so that's good. I'll post some pictures as and when I can.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  8. #708
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    225

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Sounds like you’re having a great time Ian and it’s not even summer yet. Looking fwd to pics

  9. #709
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    617

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    This is where I shifted the attachment point for the main halliard on the yard. It didn't leave much of a scar. But now I'm going to take all three of these attachment points off the yard, when I get home, as will be seen.


    We left home the next day and have been living on the boat ever since. We travelled north to Akaroa (near Christchurch) for the annual regatta there of the Canterbury Classic Boats group - the same people we saw at Lake Hood last March - that we have been going to for the last few years with our other boats. However, this time the weather was bad and we decided not to launch Kotik. I did not take any photos but there are some here: http://www.cantyclassicboats.co.nz/. From there we drove further north to Lake Rotoiti, which is the scene of the annual Nelson-based Antique and Classic Boat Show that we have been to a few times, held in March, usually the weekend after Lake Hood. See http://www.nzclassicboats.com/ . We camped at Murchison on the way. This photo shows our trailer rig, with the main mast propped up for easier camping, and the rest of the spars lashed to the trailer. Alison made bags to contain the yard with the mainsail on it, the mizzen boom with the sail on it, the mizzen mast, and the main boom.


    We were at Lake Rotoiti for four days and it rained most of the time. I had sloped the cockpit sole back to drain into the motor well, instead of forward to drain through pipes through the hull as shown in the plans, but I had overlooked the fact that Kotik has a nose down attitude on the trailer, so it still collects water. Hmmm...


    However, we did manage to go sailing on the lake one day, with hardly any wind.


    (The tiller extension needs leather on it where it comes over the cockpit coaming.)


    From Rotoiti we drove down the Wairau Valley to Picton, which is the southern terminal of the Cook Strait ferries. Here is Kotik in the Waikawa Bay Marina, looking small among the other boats.


    I have done this posting in the Picton Public Library, as it is a real Cook Strait storm today. I saw one of the ferries going out at 7.30 this morning. It will be having a rough ride.

    The next posting will be mainly about rigging.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-02-2019 at 09:07 PM. Reason: made pics smaller
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  10. #710
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    225

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for taking the time to post these pictures Ian

  11. #711
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    617

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    No worries, Andrew. Thanks for acknowledging it. It's not easy on a trip, as you know.

    Before I get onto the rigging, here is a highlight of our trip so far. We found that an event called "Tuia 250", commemorating Capt James Cook's European discovery of New Zealand and extended to celebrate the skills of European and Polynesian navigators, was about to visit Picton. You can look it up. We picked up enough detail to motor out of the marina to meet the fleet off the point at 9.30 on Friday morning (22 Nov.) as it came in. We came around the point and there was this huge armada stretched out right in front of us. There was a tug squirting water, the NZ training ship Spirit of New Zealand, the Endeavour replica from Sydney, and two Polynesian ocean-going double-hulled waka (canoes), and a huge number of accompanying boats of all sorts. We tagged along and got in amongst them as they arrived at Picton harbour. Here are a few photos:

    The fleet, as we first saw it.


    The two waka: The white one, Fa'afaite, is from Tahiti. The red one, Haunui, is from Auckland and has sailed to Easter Island and back.


    The NZ waka Haunui and the Endeavour.


    The Endeavour replica. I have been aboard her a couple of times and spent a night on her.


    The Spirit of New Zealand. I have sailed on her.


    Fa'afaite and Ngahiraka Mai Tawhiti .Would you call that a gunter rig?


    That was a pretty exciting day. We had a little sailing adventure on our way back around to Waikawa Bay, but the library is closing now, so I have to go.
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-07-2019 at 08:26 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  12. #712
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    617

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    We are in the Picton Public Library again. It is a very wet day today.

    On our way back from Picton to the Waikawa Bay Marina on 22 November, we sailed with jib and mizzen part of the way, during which a big yacht called Enchante (e acute) came up and took these photos. The skipper asked me for my cell-phone number so that he could send them to me, which was very decent of him. He sent them to me the same day, but I have not figured out how to transfer them to my computer, so yesterday I took photos of them with my camera. They have not come out very clearly but this is the best I can do just now.
    After we had sailed like this for half an hour or so the northerly wind came up fairly strongly against us so we furled the jib and motored. I didn't furl the mizzen as it had no lazyjacks then and would have gone all over the place. After we had rounded the point into Waikawa Bay we had a good run in the building whitecaps back to the marina with just the mizzen pushing us, which is probably not usually recommended but worked well.





    Jobs for the next few days included installing lazyjacks on main and mizzen, trying on the Alison's prototype sail covers and boom tent, completely rearranging the main halliard, and installing halliards for the jib cover and the flags. These have involved lowering the main mast twice and the mizzen mast once. The first time we took her out of the water but the second time we left her in the berth. We found that there is enough slack in the tabernacle to lower the main mast with the mizzen still standing. The main goes down on one side of it, preferably the starboard side because the mizzen is 2" (50mm) off-centre, but it can also go down the port side,which shows that the mizzen can be in the centre and the main mast will still go down on either side of it. Maybe this has potential for raising the mast as it is proving a bit difficult so far.


    The flags are the New Zealand Red Ensign and the pennant of the Otago Trailer Yacht Squadron.


    Here she is with one of our experimental sail-raisings.


    This is not the boom tent. It is just a simple awning to shed the rain if we want the sliding hatch open.


    As mentioned above, I rearranged the main halliard, as there was no room for a block between the mast and the yard. I took the halliard out, cut it into two pieces, turned the shorter one into a "whip" by lashing the block onto it and feeding it through the main sheave so that the block is on the front of the mast and the other end is tied directly to the jaws of the yard. I then gave it a purchase with the other piece by anchoring it to the bottom of the tabernacle, leading it up through the block and back to the cleat on the tabernacle. You don't want to let go of the end when you are tying it onto the jaws of the yard as the weight of the block will pull it down the mast and the end will disappear through the sheave! I will take all those "bumps" off the yard when we get home. I also put another line on the yard to pull it up to the vertical before raising it on the halliard. This will enable reefing without having to lower the whole thing onto the boom. This system is as indicated in the plans, as I decided that the other sytem I was going to use was unsuitable for this size of boat.
    The boat is ready for a trial sail now, but the weather is unsuitable. We hope to have a go tomorrow.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  13. #713
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    New Zealand's Far North
    Posts
    8,915

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Great pics thanks Ian, I hope you are missing the wild weather.
    I have found the best way to transfer pics from the phone to the computer is to email them to myself. with a bit of luck that should work for you.
    Money may not buy happiness, but it can buy a boat that will pull right up next to it!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •