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Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #701
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Ian, pure delight!

    So happy for you.

    Regards,
    John.
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  2. #702
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Absolutely lovely! That's a lot of marlinspike seamanship going on on that boat. Great job!

    Hope you have many fine and adventurous day this summer.

    Mike

  3. #703
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, John and Mike. You're both impressive workers too.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  4. #704
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Just great Ian. Where was that you put in? Minus 5 and snow on way, your summer about to start, need some good photos to get through a cold dark winter!

  5. #705
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    Default

    That is such a delight!
    Well done Ian.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  6. #706
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Many great summers coming up. You’ve done exceptionally well Ian and in double quick time too.

  7. #707
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Ian. Good to hear from you. That boat ramp is the one at the Otematata Boat Harbour at the head of Lake Aviemore, below the Benmore dam. You probably know it. We had come over the Lindis Pass from Wanaka to see the annual "Aviemore Classic" trailer yacht racing, which we have enjoyed socially in the past, although not serious racers. We didn't launch on the race days this time as the weather was bad and a lot of the yachts took a hammering, but we launched on the Monday morning (our Labour Day) when it was calm.
    Thanks also, Gypsie and Andrew.
    Since then we have been to the annual Canterbury Classic Boats regatta at Akaroa, (which is the same bunch of people we saw last March at Lake Hood) but we didn't launch there either as we were not rigged in time, the weather was bad, and the ramp was unsuitable for Kotik. We have managed it in the past with Islesburgh, but Kotik is deeper and heavier. From there we drove north to Lake Rotoiti (Nelson Lakes), where we camped in the boat for four more nights, rigged her last Friday (the only day it wasn't raining), and "sailed" her on Saturday, in the rain, with no wind. On Sunday we unrigged her and came to Picton, which is the southern terminal of the Cook Strait ferries, staying at a motor camp so far. So far here we have raised the tow-ball of the coupling, shortened the boom (as it was hitting the VHF aerial!), and made a few more minor improvements. We have also been sleeping in the boat for this whole trip so far, so the living arrangements are gradually falling into shape. Tomorrow we will put Kotik into the Waikawa Bay marina and live on her there for the next couple of weeks, and sail her as much as we can to get to know how she behaves. We have a friend in Picton who is helping us too, so that's good. I'll post some pictures as and when I can.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  8. #708
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Sounds like you’re having a great time Ian and it’s not even summer yet. Looking fwd to pics

  9. #709
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    This is where I shifted the attachment point for the main halliard on the yard. It didn't leave much of a scar. But now I'm going to take all three of these attachment points off the yard, when I get home, as will be seen.


    We left home the next day and have been living on the boat ever since. We travelled north to Akaroa (near Christchurch) for the annual regatta there of the Canterbury Classic Boats group - the same people we saw at Lake Hood last March - that we have been going to for the last few years with our other boats. However, this time the weather was bad and we decided not to launch Kotik. I did not take any photos but there are some here: http://www.cantyclassicboats.co.nz/. From there we drove further north to Lake Rotoiti, which is the scene of the annual Nelson-based Antique and Classic Boat Show that we have been to a few times, held in March, usually the weekend after Lake Hood. See http://www.nzclassicboats.com/ . We camped at Murchison on the way. This photo shows our trailer rig, with the main mast propped up for easier camping, and the rest of the spars lashed to the trailer. Alison made bags to contain the yard with the mainsail on it, the mizzen boom with the sail on it, the mizzen mast, and the main boom.


    We were at Lake Rotoiti for four days and it rained most of the time. I had sloped the cockpit sole back to drain into the motor well, instead of forward to drain through pipes through the hull as shown in the plans, but I had overlooked the fact that Kotik has a nose down attitude on the trailer, so it still collects water. Hmmm...


    However, we did manage to go sailing on the lake one day, with hardly any wind.


    (The tiller extension needs leather on it where it comes over the cockpit coaming.)


    From Rotoiti we drove down the Wairau Valley to Picton, which is the southern terminal of the Cook Strait ferries. Here is Kotik in the Waikawa Bay Marina, looking small among the other boats.


    I have done this posting in the Picton Public Library, as it is a real Cook Strait storm today. I saw one of the ferries going out at 7.30 this morning. It will be having a rough ride.

    The next posting will be mainly about rigging.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-02-2019 at 09:07 PM. Reason: made pics smaller
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  10. #710
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for taking the time to post these pictures Ian

  11. #711
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    No worries, Andrew. Thanks for acknowledging it. It's not easy on a trip, as you know.

    Before I get onto the rigging, here is a highlight of our trip so far. We found that an event called "Tuia 250", commemorating Capt James Cook's European discovery of New Zealand and extended to celebrate the skills of European and Polynesian navigators, was about to visit Picton. You can look it up. We picked up enough detail to motor out of the marina to meet the fleet off the point at 9.30 on Friday morning (22 Nov.) as it came in. We came around the point and there was this huge armada stretched out right in front of us. There was a tug squirting water, the NZ training ship Spirit of New Zealand, the Endeavour replica from Sydney, and two Polynesian ocean-going double-hulled waka (canoes), and a huge number of accompanying boats of all sorts. We tagged along and got in amongst them as they arrived at Picton harbour. Here are a few photos:

    The fleet, as we first saw it.


    The two waka: The white one, Fa'afaite, is from Tahiti. The red one, Haunui, is from Auckland and has sailed to Easter Island and back.


    The NZ waka Haunui and the Endeavour.


    The Endeavour replica. I have been aboard her a couple of times and spent a night on her.


    The Spirit of New Zealand. I have sailed on her.


    Fa'afaite and Ngahiraka Mai Tawhiti .Would you call that a gunter rig?


    That was a pretty exciting day. We had a little sailing adventure on our way back around to Waikawa Bay, but the library is closing now, so I have to go.
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-07-2019 at 08:26 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  12. #712
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    We are in the Picton Public Library again. It is a very wet day today.

    On our way back from Picton to the Waikawa Bay Marina on 22 November, we sailed with jib and mizzen part of the way, during which a big yacht called Enchante (e acute) came up and took these photos. The skipper asked me for my cell-phone number so that he could send them to me, which was very decent of him. He sent them to me the same day, but I have not figured out how to transfer them to my computer, so yesterday I took photos of them with my camera. They have not come out very clearly but this is the best I can do just now.
    After we had sailed like this for half an hour or so the northerly wind came up fairly strongly against us so we furled the jib and motored. I didn't furl the mizzen as it had no lazyjacks then and would have gone all over the place. After we had rounded the point into Waikawa Bay we had a good run in the building whitecaps back to the marina with just the mizzen pushing us, which is probably not usually recommended but worked well.





    Jobs for the next few days included installing lazyjacks on main and mizzen, trying on Alison's prototype sail covers and boom tent, completely rearranging the main halliard, and installing halliards for the jib cover and the flags. These have involved lowering the main mast twice and the mizzen mast once. The first time we took her out of the water but the second time we left her in the berth. We found that there is enough slack in the tabernacle to lower the main mast with the mizzen still standing. The main goes down on one side of it, preferably the starboard side because the mizzen is 2" (50mm) off-centre, but it can also go down the port side,which shows that the mizzen can be in the centre and the main mast will still go down on either side of it. Maybe this has potential for raising the mast as it is proving a bit difficult so far.


    The flags are the New Zealand Red Ensign and the pennant of the Otago Trailer Yacht Squadron.


    Here she is with one of our experimental sail-raisings.


    This is not the boom tent. It is just a simple awning to shed the rain if we want the sliding hatch open.


    As mentioned above, I rearranged the main halliard, as there was no room for a block between the mast and the yard. I took the halliard out, cut it into two pieces, turned the shorter one into a "whip" by lashing the block onto it and feeding it through the main sheave so that the block is on the front of the mast and the other end is tied directly to the jaws of the yard. I then gave it a purchase with the other piece by anchoring it to the bottom of the tabernacle, leading it up through the block and back to the cleat on the tabernacle. You don't want to let go of the end when you are tying it onto the jaws of the yard as the weight of the block will pull it down the mast and the end will disappear through the sheave! I will take all those "bumps" off the yard when we get home. I also put another line on the yard to pull it up to the vertical before raising it on the halliard. This will enable reefing without having to lower the whole thing onto the boom. This system is as indicated in the plans, as I decided that the other system I was going to use was unsuitable for this size of boat.
    The boat is ready for a trial sail now, but the weather is unsuitable. We hope to have a go tomorrow.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-20-2019 at 02:10 AM. Reason: typo.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  13. #713
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Great pics thanks Ian, I hope you are missing the wild weather.
    I have found the best way to transfer pics from the phone to the computer is to email them to myself. with a bit of luck that should work for you.
    Money may not buy happiness, but it can buy a boat that will pull right up next to it!

  14. #714
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Sounds like your getting things sorted Ian. Looking forward to a normal bed yet?

  15. #715
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Lovely photos Ian. Yes those name places bring up a lot of memories. I dont have my old road map to hand, suffice to say i did a complete circuit of the South Island, and a lot of the Canterbury/Otago interior in a 4x4, with criss-crossess coast to coast at certain points that were of interest. North Island couldnt compete overall (imho), not to say i wouldnt pack my bag and leave tomorrow if i could stay there.
    Excellent boat choice for your purposes, the trailer sailer scene does not exist up here, certainly not as far as any clubs go that i am aware of. I think the Albin 57 was the last home produced boat specifically designed for trailer launching, and that fizzled out in 1981 after 400 boats.
    Hope the weather improves, from what i saw the other day there is a nasty low developing in the Tasman coming your way. Good to see all the adjustments and tinkering anyway. Thanks for sharing.

  16. #716
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Love the boat and the blog Ian. My son stays in Waikanae.

  17. #717
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Wow, Ian, great adventures!

    Thanks for keeping us updated, it’s a great vicarious pleasure.

    Kotik looks so bloody good!
    http://fairmaid.blogspot.com.au/

    "It's dawning on me that I should have worked out the tumbler details more in advance, rather than rely on bluster and over confidence. But that's just silly." Jim Ledger.

  18. #718
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I hope the weather starts cooperating with your travel plans. I'm curious how your Norwegian tiller works in the long run.

    Might want to correct this next time:

    Under the traveler usually works better.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  19. #719
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Congratulations Ian. She looks beautiful. Well done and great to see out on the water.
    Travis.

  20. #720
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks guys, and Merry Christmas to all of you.

    Stilleto, thanks for that good suggestion. The trouble is that my phone is not very smart. It is not set up for internet or emails. The weather wasn't too bad but the wind would come up very strongly quite quickly, and it rained most days but not all the time. It's still unsettled spring weather.

    Yes, we're getting there, Andrew. The bed (bunk) on Kotik is pretty good too. You just don't want to sit up too suddenly. With the separate forward "cabin", we found Kotik fairly easy to live in.

    Glad you like it, Ian. Sounds like you've seen most of this country. Where are you from originally, if I may ask? Like you, we prefer the South Island to the North. I just looked up the Albin 57. It looks pretty good. We got home last Sunday. Monday was dry so we put the boat back in the workshop. It has rained on and off every day since.

    Hi Lexi, Glad you like it too. I was brought up in Wellington, so I know where Waikanae is, just up the coast a bit. That whole coast is a lot more built up than it was in my time.

    Thanks John. We've got some more adventures planned for the summer, so I hope to get some good photos of us sailing. How's Fairmaid coming on?

    You're absolutely right, Steve. I usually do have the horse on the outside. It stops the tiller extension going overboard. The main sheet arrangement needs a bit of revision too. I'm not sure that I like the combination of the Norwegian tiller with such a steeply raked stern post. It works alright going forward although it's a bit of an effort to hold it at times, but when motoring in reverse the rudder is inclined to get pushed over too far and the boat tries to climb up on it. When the rudder is on the starboard side the arm goes 'way up in the air so you can't just push back on it, you have to push it down as well, which doesn't make for a quick response. I might make a laminated loopy tiller yet.

    Hi Travis, Good to hear from you. I hope the good ship Zuri is going well.

    Here are a few pictures:

    There seems to be no way of preventing the yard from twisting like this. The line that goes around the mast is being dragged sideways off the cheek-block on the yard.


    After a week of tinkering with topping lifts, lazyjacks and the main halliard, we sailed and motored north out of Waikawa Bay to Lochmara Bay on the other side of Queen Charlotte Sound, where one of our Canterbury friends had invited us to visit him, but the weather had been too bad until then. This is Kotik at his pontoon. He was just leaving as we arrived, as he had to go back to Christchurch, so we didn't stay very long,


    but motored around to the next bay west, Onahau Bay, where we spent the night on a mooring. I had put oversized anchor fairleads on the bow for this reason, but this mooring line was even thicker.


    The view in the morning. This is called Fence Bay, part of Onahau Bay.




    The next morning, Wednesday, we had to pull out of the Waikawa Marina, pack up the boat, and leave Picton. At Akaroa and Picton we had caught up with some old friends and made some new ones in the Picton Clinker and Classic Boat Club Inc. We travelled south over the next three days, stopping for nights at Kaikoura and Christchurch. I thought I had done as much as I could do to the main halliard, but we still hadn't had a chance to test it, so we bypassed Dunedin and went straight on down to Lake Waihola, about 20km south of here. It's a good training pond. We rigged her on Saturday in the rain, and went sailing on Sunday, beating, reaching and running. She handled well, and I think she is reasonably fast too, but that remains for further study. I don't really have much experience of sailing other boats.
    I rigged the main with one reef.


    The tack, reef points, kicking strap, and Barber-hauler for the jib sheet if I ever use the jib partly furled.


    As I mentioned, Kotik is back in the workshop now for some minor repairs, adjustments and odd jobs. We have been sorting out the gear and drying it where necessary, and generally refining it for our next trip in mid-January. I'll show some more rigging details, and it might be time to move over to the People and Places section after that.

    All the best for Christmas and the New Year.
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 01-06-2020 at 04:46 AM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  21. #721
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    You’ve probably thought of it Ian but I’m thinking leave this thread here for future reference for future builders and start a new ‘TRavels of Kotik” thread in P&P. It’s great to see a country vicariously (is that the correct word?)

    2c Andrew

  22. #722
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Yes, thanks, Andrew. That's what I meant, really. This one certainly belongs in the Building section. I'll put the technical stuff here and the scenery in the P&P, following the example of Michael Owen with his "Ilur in R.I." and "Sailing my Ilur" threads.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  23. #723
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Congratulations Ian!
    You can be really proud of this beautiful boat.
    It's nice to see it on the water.
    Have fun with it for many years…
    Regards
    Sönke

  24. #724
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Ian, the family (grandparents) were Sussex folk, but moved up to South London, at the start of the war, my grandfather was an aircraft engineer at Croydon airport. They stayed in the area after the war. My auntie who moved to Herbert/Omaru was born there, and she finally succumbed to the big C just before Xmas. I was born there too, so depending on your ear, i sound either like Derek Trotter from "only fools and horses", or some geezer from Eastenders. Though once i made my fortune in the city, i moved out never to return......that was over half a life time ago......

    Look forward to more escapades of the good ship Kotik!
    Ian. AKA RusBot

    Quote Originally Posted by oznabrag View Post
    A sure sign of the Apocalypse.

    I agree with Skaraborgcraft.

  25. #725
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Sonke. It has been good having you on board. I hope your boatbuilding dream comes true. All the best, Ian

    Hi Ian. Thanks for explaining your New Zealand connection. Families do get spread around these days, don't they. You live in some interesting places now. I have appreciated your interest and comments along the way. They have been good for my confidence as an amateur.

    Kotik is nearly ready to come back out of the workshop, so we will then do another trial rig. I think I've got it right now, so I should be able to do another posting in a day or two.

    Ian

    P.S. Sonke and Ian. I don't want you to feel that I am dismissing you. Please stay "on board". Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 01-10-2020 at 03:46 AM. Reason: P.S.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  26. #726
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian, good luck with your mods, I’m interested what you have done with the gaff to stop it misbehaving. I have a question for you - I think i read that you used Merbau for your rubbing strokes, Can you tell me what you did about the tannin that leaches out everywhere?

    Thanks Andrew

  27. #727
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Andrew. We got her out today and plan on rigging her tomorrow. I haven't been able to do anything about the yard twisting yet, so we'll just have to see what it does this time. Maybe the jaws are too wide.
    Yes, I used merbau (kwila) for the keelson, floors, frames, stems and rubbing strakes, all sealed with epoxy, then finished as appropriate (paint, Cetol, or nothing). When I steamed the aft rubbing strakes and emptied the steamer later, the water came out purple, and the old towels that I had blocked the outlet with were all stained.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  28. #728
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for that Ian. I picked some up today and it was a bit wet and leaching tannins. I read up about it and it has a reputation of that. Apparently if you wash with bleach it gets rid of the leaching. So I reckon ill do that after i steam it.
    I been thinking about your yard problem and apart from putting a track to run the bolt rope in Ive not got much idea. Sorry. I hope you find the answer soon. maybe you could try Iain Oughtred via email with a couple of pictures to see if he has any ideas or your sailmaker?
    Last edited by Andrew Donald; 01-10-2020 at 10:27 AM.

  29. #729
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Andrew, I didn't have any problem with my kwila/merbau leaching after it was epoxy-sealed, but you may not want to epoxy it. You could try a test piece with the bleach first.

    Anyway, as mentioned a while ago, here are some rigging details. We spent most of today on it. Alison made the final version of the mizzen sail cover, and part of the main cover, but was having frustrating problems with the sewing machine.

    This is making parrel beads from the cores of a hole-saw. I used a coarse sanding disc on my electric drill this time, instead of the belt-sander. There are 87 beads on Kotik now.


    This is the box for the steaming light, which can be strapped to the mainmast at any convenient height. The box for the stern light is in the same style. Each box is the same width as its mast. The stern light can go above or below the boom as required, but usually above as it is unlikely that we will be sailing at night. The lights have their own batteries. I will probably need to put some duct tape over the straps to stop them slipping, each time I use them.


    The parrelbeads on the mizzen luff. They allow the boom to swing over the cockpit for handling the sail, and also keep the sail close to the mast when furling. The lines will be trimmed later.


    A general view of the stern. The Turk's head knot is painted white, as mentioned in "The Arts of the Sailor" by Hervey Garret Smith.


    Each topping lift has an Alpine Butterfly Knot, with a double thumb knot connecting the lazyjacks buttoned through it. One side can be unbuttoned when rigging the sail, and done up again around the sail.


    The gunter-yard now has a cheek-block and a saddle to carry the line that pulls the yard up vertically to the mast. So far I have not found a way to prevent the yard from twisting sideways, so I will replace the cheek-block with one of those thick fairleads that allow the line to come through at any angle. Thanks for those suggestions, Andrew.


    That will do for now.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  30. #730
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    11,540

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Alpine butterfly knot. Thats my learn something use full every day quota hit. Thanks.
    Ian. AKA RusBot

    Quote Originally Posted by oznabrag View Post
    A sure sign of the Apocalypse.

    I agree with Skaraborgcraft.

  31. #731
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
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    Posts
    517

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Ian.
    Beautiful build - I've been admiring since the beginning.
    On the yard, is the twist because the halyard load is applied to the side of the yard rather than centered, or is there some other moment/torsional load being applied?

  32. #732
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    That's good, Ian. You're welcome, as they say. Another one I use at every opportunity is the buntline hitch. I expect you know that one.
    Sorry about your auntie. Also sorry I didn't get to meet you.

    Thanks, DoctorB. Glad you like it. The rig, as shown in the plans, is a "sliding gunter". The main halyard is attached to the jaws. The parrel line that keeps the yard upright comes off a deck-eye on one side of the yard, around the mast and into the cheekblock on the other side of the yard, and then is cleated to the yard as you can see, so theoretically the yard should hang straight, but there is nothing to keep it straight either. That line has to be rigged that way though, when you see how it works when you're raising the sail. It pulls the yard up to vertical first, then the halyard pulls it up the mast. STOP PRESS: I just found a Duckworks article showing the halyard and parrel line attachments the other way up from mine. I might try that some time.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  33. #733
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    249

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Bit hard to tell from first pic in #720 Ian but i always imagined the halyard on gunters attached just below where mast sheave lines up on yard in the hoisted position. That way it gets pulled up and into mast at same time. Maybe wrong though.

  34. #734
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
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    Posts
    517

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    STOP PRESS: I just found a Duckworks article showing the halyard and parrel line attachments the other way up from mine. I might try that some time.

    Ian
    I've got nothing, but am standing by for your solution. The main sheave is centered through the mast, the throat halyard is centered on the jaws...how about the mains'l lacing near the throat? Anything pulling off center there? Sorry I'm just guessing. I'll keep my trap shut and continue watching.

  35. #735
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    Mar 2015
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for your thoughts, Andrew and DoctorB. The way you suggest Andrew, is exactly how I was going to have it, as kindly shown to me by Paul Grun at PTWBF 2017. When I tried to set it up that way, it was complicated by the need for a purchase, which Paul's Eel canoe-yawl Pick Pocket does not have, being a smaller boat. Where to find room for the block became a problem, so I rerigged the halyard the way it is shown in the plans, with the result you see. DoctorB, I found that if I laced the sail too tightly to the yard the luff was held down tangentially to the yard, aggravating the problem, so I loosened the lacing to allow the sail to stand out "radially". You are right about the parrel-line pulling the yard sideways.
    Anyway, we are about to set out for a shake-down cruise on Lake Manapouri, a lake I know quite well, so I will do some more experimenting along the way. I'll report back in a couple of weeks.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

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