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Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #911
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
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    492

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    All clear, all good. Great news Ian, onward and upward, summers coming.
    Cheers,
    Mike.

  2. #912
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    Mar 2019
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    Rushworth, Australia
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    831

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Great news Ian.

  3. #913
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Schleswig Holstein Germany
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    960

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Fantastic.
    Thumps up mate!

  4. #914
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    877

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks a lot, guys. Yes, we're looking forward to the summer.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  5. #915
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    NW Georgia
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    196

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Wonderful news! PTL!!

  6. #916
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    877

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Dale. PTL indeed, and modern medical science!

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #917
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian,

    thanks so much for documenting this build, I have thoroughly enjoyed watching your beautiful boat take shape. Its so good to see photos on the water and to hear that both of you are doing well after some minor adjustments.

    Your build has been both inspiring and intimidating: it inspired me to want to build such a beautiful boat for myself, but after seeing your posts continue to detail the amounts of intricate work required I felt as though it would be beyond me.

    However, now I have might the opportunity to buy mostly completed Wee Seal which would make the dream seem possible once more. Of course my thoughts have not been about the costs involved in buying it and the effort required in finishing it. Instead my mind has wandered to thoughts about which rig I would put on it. And so to my question..

    In an earlier post you listed the heights of the mast (top of the yard) for sloop and yawl rigged Wee Seals as height above the cabin. Do you know how high above the waterline that would be? I sail on the Swan River in Western Australia and would like to be able to sail under the Fremantle traffic bridges without dropping the mast. There are three bridges in a row with the lowest having a clearance of 7.1m. What do you think of the possibility of sailing clear through without adjusting the rig (wind dependant of course).

    As a fallback I guess it could be possible to reef the main and drop the yard to a lower position to gain more clearance.

    Or should I be dreaming about the yawl rig instead...

  8. #918
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
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    4,346

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I have a set of Wee Seal plans.

    The gaff sloop rig mast is 6m tall, adding the gaff takes it to 8m above waterline

    Gunter yawl mast is 5.6m tall with the gunter taking it to 7.3m

    I've never sailed a gunter rigged boat so I don't know what is involved with raising and lowering. The gaff however, I think you could simply lower the peak and slide under the bridge if the wind is in your favor.

    For what it's worth, I find the mizzen on my Eun Mara to be very handy.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  9. #919
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Narellen, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    317

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I have a Gunter rigged Tammie Norrie and it's dead easy to lower the gaff. Mine has peak and throat halyards and I'd probably ease the throat rather than the peak, it would just keep things tidier but that depends on how low the gaff will drop but in this case given that there are three bridges in a row I'd recommend setting up a good easy reefing system and reef it right down so you can keep sailing through.

  10. #920
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    877

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Microbe,
    Thanks for your comments. Glad you have enjoyed my thread. That's a very good question in your situation, and thanks to Steve and Steve for answering it. Sorry I've been a bit slow.

    My Wee Seal/Kotik plans are the same as Steve B's and I can confirm his measurements. The Wee Seal drawings show the high-pitched gaff rig on the sloop and the "sliding gunter" on the yawl. You could have either rig on either boat. With a clearance of 7m it seems that you could sail under your lowest bridge with the mast up, but not under full sail. With either rig as shown, you could do it with the two reefs in, or one reef if you want to try it, carefully! Otherwise, you could scandalize the main by easing the peak halliard to put the spar in the horizontal position, which depowers the sail but allows the lower half to keep driving. Then it can be hauled up again quickly after the bridge.
    Here's a pic of my friend Bob Lewis's Eun na Mara Morna doing that on Lake Burley Griffin at Canberra in 2016.



    Kotik
    has the sliding gunter but with only one halyard, so I would have to lower the sail enough to get under the bridge or maybe all the way, and go "jib and jigger" (jib and mizzen). She sails well that way too. The choice of sloop or yawl depends on how you intend to keep and use the boat. We keep ours on the trailer at home, so we can take her to go sailing in different places. We have to rig her every time, so she's not a boat just to take out on a sunny afternoon, and of course the mizzen mast and sail take more time, trouble and expense to make in the first place, and increase the rigging time. We like having it when we're cruising, but a local one-day event tended to become a three-day exercise for us with our Eun na Mara Islesburgh, so we stopped doing them after a while. On the other hand, Steve keeps his EM Marianita in a marina, mostly rigged, with plenty of water in every direction, so the rigging time is not a problem.

    See also www.alistego.com, and WB archive thread "Building a Wee Seal (very slowly)".

    Good luck with that Wee Seal. Of course it goes without saying that you should make sure you get the plans with it.
    Any more questions, feel free.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 10-13-2021 at 04:21 PM. Reason: sp.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  11. #921
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for the information Ian, Steve and Steve.

    That's a great picture of the Eun Na Mara with the scandalised gaff/yard. I had considered that as an option but wasn't sure if that is possible with a sliding gunter arrangement.

    Ian, how have you found Kotik to sail? As you mention earlier the yawl rig on Kotik has much more sail area than Wee Seal and when you compare them both to something like a Vivier Jewell they both seem quite light. The Jewel is about the same size, is lighter yet has 22m2 sail to Wee Seal's 15.86m2. I know we're not comparing apples with apples, but would you consider the Oughtred boats under canvassed?

    Perth, WA has quite binary wind - its either fluky 0-5knts or gusty 20-25knts and rarely a nice consistent 10knts. So having lots of sail area for light winds, but plenty of options for shortening sail would be ideal - hence my interest in the yawl rig.

    As yet this is all academic as I haven't secured the Wee Seal yet :-)

  12. #922
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    877

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Microbe,
    Sorry for the slow reply, We've been away.
    No, I do not consider Oughtred boats to be under-canvassed . I have not compared them with other designs. I have seen a review somewhere saying that Iain provides generous sail areas, so that one reef becomes the normal configuration, with full sail for light airs.
    Kotik sails very well, including under jib and jigger. As I said above, I like having a mizzen when we are cruising, but plenty of boats do very well without one.
    If you had the sliding gunter rig, you would just ease the halyard until the yard was low enough to go under the bridge, at whatever angle it went to, but the sail would not be driving.
    Personally, having experienced both rigs, I would use the high-pitched gaff rig on your Wee Seal.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  13. #923
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    877

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    We are having a pleasant spring season here, with the rhododendrons flowering, blackbirds singing and all that, but we still have not been sailing. We took the boat up to Otematata, where the hydro lakes are, inland from Oamaru, on 14th October, and stayed there for about 10 days. (See #810, page 24.) The first weekend we helped put up a big marquee, with fellow-members of the Otago Trailer Yacht Squadron, then spent the next three days setting up the rigging properly after we had had it all apart over the winter, making use of the big paddock there, then we launched her into the little boat harbour and spent the next three days trying to get the motor going properly, which it wouldn't, even though it had just been serviced, and we had help from a couple of other guys, then on the last day when we thought we had the motor under control we found that the centreboard was jammed again, so we didn't go sailing after all. We had to come home the next day.

    The second weekend was our Labour Weekend, with trailer yacht racing in various classes and then the "Aviemore Classic", which we could have gone in, but couldn't. It is twice round Lake Aviemore. We used to do it with Islesburgh, even though we were usually the slowest, so we would pull out when the others were finishing. I suppose that sounds silly but we used to enjoy the weekend socially as much as anything. We found this year that most of the people we used to know there have taken up motor-homes instead, and most of the boats were fast modern "sports boats", so it wasn't really our scene any more. We were living on the boat the whole time anyway, so it was quite good that way as a shake-down for our camping systems. The OTYS went cruising on Lake Benmore, the next one upstream, so we will probably do that next year. It's a good lake for cruising on, not too far away, and no sandflies!


    Anyway, last week I have fixed the centreboard again, and the motor is back at the dealer's. I should probably learn to service it myself!

    Here are a few pics of the centreboard fix. I hope it works this time. See also #762, page 22. The lanyard had gone off the end of the roller I put in last time, in spite of the "guides."

    These are scraps of 9 and 19mm plywood.
    P1020421.jpg

    The glue is from small tins of International epoxy glue I've had for years, It's a dark colour.
    P1020422.jpg

    The varnish is Sikkens Cetol HsLe I use for touch-ups.
    Correction: No, it was my usual WEST105/205 mix. My measuring glasses can measure small quantities. I hung the pulley on a nail to set, and rolled it around in my gloved hands when it was half set to avoid having hardened drips.
    P1020423.jpg

    And here it is in place, with plenty of goop around the ends of the bolt, and one bead of sealant right around the case, which will be easier to slice through than two beads, if I have to take it off again. . The blue stuff is fairly dense closed-cell foam which should act as a keeper. If the wooden guides had not
    already been there, I would have used a piece of foam the full width. (I have also thought of using Denso tape around the case, to seal the lid. Has anybody tried that?)
    P1020425.jpg

    And here is another shelf in the galley, allowing room for a 1.5 litre bottle under it, and a loaf of bread, or anything else in that line, on top.
    P1020426.jpg

    More to come...

    Cheers, Ian








    Last edited by IanMilne; 11-08-2021 at 03:13 PM. Reason: Correction and layout.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  14. #924
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    877

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I also made an anchor crane or cat-head to make weighing the anchor a bit easier than doing a "dead-lift" over the side of the boat. It is made out of offcuts of the 19mm 13-ply that I used for the rudder. I made it to fit over the mooring cleat on one side or the other, with a 100 x 16 mm galvanised bolt through a dinghy drain hole in the deck, with the plug screwed in when the crane is not in use. The holes are over the cave-lockers, so if they leak a bit it won't matter, but they shouldn't anyway. The lower edges have leather glued on where they press against the deck.

    P1020444.jpg

    P1020443.jpg

    P1020439.jpg
    The other side is the same. I had put reinforcing blocks under the deck for the cleats when I built the deck, but they didn't go all the way across to the carlins, so I put extra pieces of 19mm ply in where the bolt holes are, almost the same length as the cleats and wide enough to fill the gap, which I tested with a dry assembly. I slathered them well with some left-over industrial adhesive-sealant, pushed them up into place, and bolted the whole assemby together while the sealant set. I did them on separate days as I only had one bolt.

    I have abandoned the idea of bringing the main halyard back to the cockpit, as I would have to bring the topping lift back as well, and I never did want lines all along the deck. So that nice big cleat on the cabin bulkhead is declared redundant. I guess it will get things hung on it at various times.

    I have some photos from Aviemore, so I'll put them up tomorrow.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  15. #925
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
    Posts
    492

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian,

    Great idea with that removable cathead business. You have just given me the answer I'm looing for.
    I want to remove a great lump of wood and bronze off the bow of Janet that passes for a couple of bow rollers.
    They were once described to me as looking like a pair of dogs b...s, not a good look for a boat called Janet.
    I see the sailing adventures have begun, good stuff.
    Hope you are keeping well.

    Cheers,
    Mike.
    Focus on the effort not the outcome.

  16. #926
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    877

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Mike. Glad to hear that. There are two layers of 19mm ply at the back of it where the bolt goes through. I think an important detail is that the hole in the deck is over an area which will get a bit wet anyway, not over the interior of the cabin. I do my anchoring from the stern, and then walk the cable forward to secure it. It worked alright on our 2019-20 trips. The anchors (2) live in the long cockpit locker.

    I am OK now, thanks.

    Here are some photos from Aviemore, not that they really tell you much. I went out one day on a friend's boat, Chinook. There was no wind, as you can see. The sail number is a voluntary thing in NZ. It is required if you want to go in for serious trailer yacht racing, which we don't, but otherwise serves as a means of identification through "Yachting New Zealand". (The photos on page 20, #695 ff. are from the same place. )

    The mizzen mast is 2" (50mm) off-centre, and there is enough slack in the tabernacle that you can lower the mainmast with the mizzen still standing. That's handy if you forget to take the trailer flag off the top of the mast!
    P1020383.jpg

    It can also be handy to haul the mizzen boom higher at times.
    P1020384.jpg

    The new sail number. I was installing reef points in the sail, and checking to see that the reefing system worked.
    P1020389.jpg

    Out on Chinook.
    .P1020390.jpg

    Chinook, going out.
    P1020398.jpg

    Until next time....

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

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