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Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #561
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I'm getting a bit ahead of my postings again. Here's another double dose.

    For the toerails, I marked out the positions of seven screw holes along each side of the roof, then took a scrap of wood of the same cross-section as the rails and drilled a vertical hole in it. Then I held it against the roof at the centre screw position and scribed the bevel at that point, planed it off and used the piece as a jig to drill the centre screw-hole vertically into the roof.


    I drilled the screw-holes in the rails (with counterbores for plugs), screwed each rail to the roof by the centre screw only, used it as a jig to drill the rest of the holes, and screwed it down.


    Next I measured the heights of the gap between the rail and the roof along the outside at each screw position and marked them on the rail. (The gaps went from 3 to 7mm.) Then I took the rail off the roof, marked the rolling bevel line along the inner side, and planed it off, and screwed them back onto the roof. They fitted but I haven't glued them yet.


    Next I turned to putting veneers over the plywood edges of the cabin and coaming extensions. After a couple of failures with the heat gun I made a jig, boiled the strips in the electric jug, and clamped them overnight.


    That worked quite well.




    Short intermission...
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  2. #562
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    More clamping methods:


    and


    The next operation was to put another layer of trim around the cabin, as the kauri I had been given was only 1/4" thick. Andrew did a good job with it but I had since decided that it looked a bit insubstantial. Sorry, Andrew. I did the same with the coamings and the beam across the back of the cockpit. I made the new face in one piece, then took the slide out, clamped the new piece across the gap and marked it on the back as to where to cut it, and glued the three pieces on separately, with the slide on the bench. The next day I glued the trim piece along the top, with judicious use of tape, and cut it after it was set. This is just before I took the clamps off,


    and after. I made the top wide enough to sit on as I often used to sit up there when we were motoring Islesburgh.


    Here's how the coaming came out, at the front ...


    and at the back. I drilled the forgotten limber holes with a long drill that could be held horizontally.


    I have also cleaned up the squeeze-out of glue under the cabin roof, that I forgot to do when I put the roof on. That took a bit of work with the heat gun and sandpaper. There are a few gaps to fill too.

    Today I will take all the screws out of the toe rails and counterbore them for plugs. Andrew did the plugs in the rub-rails, but I was in too much of a hurry to get the toe rails on in time for the launching. There is a bit more work to do to complete the hatches, washboards, cockpit trim, handrails and tabernacle, then I will be able to start the masts and spars. That will be fun. After that will be the rest of the varnishing and painting, and the electrical work.

    OK, that's all for now. Back to work I go...

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  3. #563
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    51

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian, thanks for the update, it is especially good as I know Kotik personally. Those coaming cappings are almost s3xy, I could look at them all day. I hope you're proud of them. Im not sure which piece of mine you deconstructed? Doesn't matter anyway, its your boat. Ive been madly painting the interior of mine and ran out of paint but its more than hop/skip/jump to shop unfortunately. So I have to find another job, gee which one of a hundred will I pick?

  4. #564
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Andrew. Glad you like the coamings. Yes, I'm quite pleased with them.
    I didn't deconstruct anything you did, I just covered up some of it. That was the curved pieces of trim at the ends of the cabin house by putting another layer of that thin kauri over them. I think they look better thicker. Some people take offence if they think you're treating their work with disrespect. I can understand that too. So thanks for being sporting about it. Your work was good, and thanks for coming over.
    Yes, you do get to stages when there are any number of jobs to be done independantly of each other and it's hard to pick which one to do next.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  5. #565
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Europe
    Posts
    10,114

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thumbs up on the cockpit coamings, nice shape. Carry on.....

  6. #566
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Ian. I wanted to make a flowing line.
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 04-30-2019 at 04:05 PM.

  7. #567
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Schleswig Holstein Germany
    Posts
    610

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    really really sharp looking coaming Ian.
    That are the small things that really enhance an allready beautifull vessel.
    I love it.

  8. #568
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Max. Glad you like it.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  9. #569
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    320

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thank you for the very useful clamping mini-tutorial, Ian! Looking great as usual.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  10. #570
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    That's alright, Alex. You can do a lot with wedges, as long as you don't glue them to the work.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  11. #571
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Another double dose coming up. I've been completing some jobs and catching up on some of the small ones that were left "until later".

    All four hatches after fibereglassing the undersides, and scrubbing the shine off three of them, with a pot-scourer pad. I am leaving the motor hatch shiny .


    The main and fore hatches fibreglassed on top. (The other two were already done.)


    Trim put on but not cleaned up yet.


    I put another layer of trim around the cabin top, as the kauri I had been given was cut so thin. The strip along the side is kwila, to contrast with the kauri.


    View from aft.


    I epoxied the undersides of the handrails before putting them on. I am using clear-finish hardener(WEST 207) now.


    End of part 1.
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 05-15-2019 at 04:30 PM. Reason: spelling "shiny"
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  12. #572
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Part 2.

    I had some difficulty getting suitable bolts for the handrails. The 5" ones were too short and the 6" ones had short threads, so I made them longer. Now that they are installed, there is some excess length to be cut off.


    I used the edge of a file with my father's 1930s lathe, to scuff up the sides of the bolts, so they would have some grip in the roof-beams, in addition to the nuts. (Never stand in line with the tang of the file.) I am pleased to have the lathe but I am a very elementary operator.


    The wash-boards. The battens are oak, pre-drilled for 3/4" (20mm) rose-headed square copper boat nails I found in my collection. They look quite good, I think.


    Making epoxy bearings in the tabernacle, using high-density filler, the same as for the centreboard pivot. This is oak, too.


    The handrails, the stopwater (?) for the sliding hatch opening, and the tabernacle were installed in that order. I will have to raise the base of the tabernacle to allow the mast to clear the hatch, just as I did with EM Islesburgh. The masking tape took the paint off. (Oops!) I have read somwewhere that it is OK to put top-coat paint directly over epoxy, but I don't think I recommend it now. I will have to see how much more will come off before I do anymore to the cabin sides, and touch up or repaint as necessary. The deck was painted out of sequence, but in time for that event in March.


    View from aft, showing another layer of kwila trim on the cockpit seats and bridge-deck, and the companionway stopwater glued, screwed and plugged. The stopwater is another piece of old mahogany bed-end.


    Well, that was the day before yesterday. We had to go out all day yesterday. Today I will take all the screws out of the toe-rails around the deck, counterbore the holes*, replace the screws and plug them, and put the veneer strips around the exposed plywood edges in the cabin that I mentioned before. There are only three of those. I also have to make the holes for the compass, speed/log read-out and two transducers. (I will also have a hand-held GPS on a hinged bracket.) I plan to be building the masts and spars next week (and the week after), followed by more epoxy coating, varnishing (inside), "Cetoling" (outside), painting...

    *I use the weakest clutch setting of my cordless drill so that the bit doesn't grab and go too deep.

    That will do for now. Back to work I go!

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 05-15-2019 at 07:24 PM. Reason: sp.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  13. #573
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    51

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Seems you’re busier now, post launch? Endless little jobs. Waiting patiently for the masts here. I cant remember Ian, your main mast is it birds mouth? I take off today, doesn’t look like a cross channel course and I was looking fwd to a French boulangerie.
    Hi to Alison as well Ian.
    see ya

    P.S. To set a depth on your drill you can drill through some small blocks then adjust the bit in chuck for fine tuning so that just the right amount sticks out. Tape the blocks to chuck.

  14. #574
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    320

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Splendiferous!

    I always put handles on my file tangs now - even if they're cheap wooden or plastic handles. Saves a lot o' grief (you can tell from that that I used not to ). Plus, you get more leverage.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 05-15-2019 at 10:42 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  15. #575
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks Andrew. I don't know about being busier than before but I've been having a fairly steady run at it lately. I expect to make the mainmast in a hollow box section, the mizzen in three layers with the middle one routered out, (both masts the same as Islesburgh's), and the two booms and the gunter yard (gaff?) birdsmouth. A variety of techniques, you might say. You must be in transit now. Hi to Connie, from us. I'm sure you will enjoy your British Coastal Skipper Course, even if it doesn't go cross-Channel. Cornish pasties are good too. Thanks for the tip about a depth gauge on a drill. I often wrap some masking tape around it.

    Thanks Alex. You are absolutely right about the file tang. Thanks for that.

    I got 21 of the screws out of the toe rails today. The heads broke off the other 30 or so, even though I was using a soldering iron to heat them. I stopped worrying because the threads went right up and it gave me enough room for plugs anyway. I had to go out tonight so I'll do the plugs tomorrow.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  16. #576
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    2,789

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    She's really coming along, you've made a lot of nice decisions.



    This little detail is wonderful, I think Ill steal it for a boat I have a mind to build in a few years.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  17. #577
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks Steve. You're welcome, as they say. It's actually a slight misinterpretation of the plan, but never mind. It looks OK to me too. I'll be keen to follow your next build, when the time comes. http://stromborg.smugmug.com/Boats/K...L/annie-XL.jpg
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  18. #578
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Here she is. Nice, eh!


    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  19. #579
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    2,789

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!


    I have a much more boring project to get through first. Living vicariously through builds like yours for now.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  20. #580
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    That will be useful, Steve. All in good time with your next boat. No pressure!

    This is a quick posting to wrap up the woodwork on the boat itself. I am about to get on with the masts and spars - only five of them this time.

    After preparing three thin strips of kauri, I steamed one piece at a time and put them into the cabin to cover the plywood edges that were still exposed. I used spring-clamps to hold them in place during the bending process and then masking tape to hold them in shape overnight, and glued them in the next day. I took the tape off and cleaned them up while the glue was still soft but firm, and will leave them like that for now.






    And in the same session I plugged all the screw-holes around the toe-rails. I trimmed them off last night, and will go out there and sand them smooth now. (The rails are just epoxied so far, not varnished yet.)


    Then we will put dust covers over the boat while I mill the timber for the masts and spars. That will make a big mess! I have always thought of a dust extractor as a bit of a luxury item for what I do, but my new thicknesser is designed to run with one attached.

    Masts and spars, here I come!

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

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