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Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #246
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    283

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Here is the current state of the play. The interior still looks like this:


    After assembling the centreboard, I shaped the sides on the bench, then propped it up to shape the edges. It weighs about 40kg.


    I coated the board with epoxy, one side at a time, and rigged a tent to help the resin set in this frosty weather. It was set enough to turn over after a couple of hours. Then I did the same with fairing filler. I took this photo this morning, before I took the tent apart.


    Then I sanded both sides flat with my belt sander. It needs a bit more fairing yet.


    I picked up the rudder fittings and chain plates from the foundry today. They are cast from aluminium bronze (AB2) which looks more yellow than silicon bronze. I asked for them not to be polished smooth and shiny. I will scrub them up a bit with a flap-disc on my angle grinder, and paint them.


    When I was making the patterns I drilled the holes in the gudgeons and assembled the parts on the sternpost, for a sneak preview. Then I filled in the holes again. The sternpost will have to be shaped a little more to fit the castings.


    I have to tear myself away from the boatbuilding for a few weeks now, but don't worry, I'll be back!
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  2. #247
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Nice castings Ian. I confess i only like bronze once its gone green......a certain J class yacht put me off polishing bronze, its a bit like varnish.....you can have too much of it.......id rather be sailing.

  3. #248
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Have a good break Ian, you've been working pretty hard. Looks good.

  4. #249
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Ian and Andrew.
    I'm not a great fan for maintaining lots of bright shiny stuff either. I think the brightwork will be either Deks Olje or Sikkens Cetol, when I get that far.
    Right now, it will be good to have a break.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  5. #250
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    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    283

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Well, we had a good break, thanks. We've been back for a couple of weeks but there have been a few things to catch up on, as is to be expected. I have been fiddling around a bit with the centreboard and it's nearly ready to paint, so it will be good to get that out of the way. Then the plan is to fillet the laps and fill the gaps under the frames, then fibreglass the inside of the planking, then fillet the frames to the planking. As I've said before, fibreglassing is not a normal part of the glued clinker method or Iain's specifications, but I'm just doing it because I couldn't get the 7-ply I wanted.
    I have been writing a report on our trip, which I am putting on the People and Places section, called "Raid Pomerania 2017". It was a very good trip.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  6. #251
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Last week I was figuring out how to sling up the centreboard and lower it into the case, so I've got a good enough system now. The board is too heavy at 45kg (100 lb) just to pick it up and drop it in. These photos were taken on different days, but show the effect.

    Here is the board slung up at its balance point, by a thin webbing strap, using a 3-part tackle hooked onto a line stretched along the overhead beam, so I can drag it across to above the c/case.


    Here's how it ends up underneath. (I filled in the pivot hole and redrilled it about 9mm (3/8") nearer the top of the board to give it a bit more
    clearance at the front. The bearing is epoxy with high density filler.


    And this is the top view.


    I put a couple of layers of fibreglass tape around the bottom corner.


    The temperature is usually 4 - 8 degrees Celsius (40 - 50 F) in the workshop these days, so I'm using fan heaters where I can.


    This is the first coat of primer/undercoat. The second coat went on today. Three coats of antifouling to go.


    Between coats of paint, I am marking a line around the inside of the hull, 45mm (1 3/4 ") below the top of the centreboard case, to locate the bunk-top framing. The lines will show up better on the bare wood than on fibreglass.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #252
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Mountain lakes of Vermont
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    9,499

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    The boat is looking fine. I, too, am intrigued by that centerboard arrangement. Hard for the pivot hole to leak if it's outside the boat!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  8. #253
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Rich.
    Progress has been in fits and starts lately, with plenty of interruptions.
    Here's a shot of the centreboard, which was meant to be the final installation, but I think I'm going to pull it out again and move the pivot hole to have the board sitting a bit higher in the case. There is enough room in the top of the case.


    I carefully levelled the boat, using the top of the case as a reference. Then I marked a position 45mm (1 3/4") above the waterline on each of the mould patterns I had made from the lofting, and used them to mark that point at each station line.


    Then I used my cheapo laser to connect the dots, right around the boat. The line marks the top of the bunk framing.


    The laser's tripod was too tall for this job, so my wife let me use this clever device from her collection.


    It's all made out of one piece. Amazing!


    After filling all the gaps under the frames and filleting the seams, I hand-sanded the whole hull with 60 grit paper. Then I made newspaper patterns for the pieces of 10 oz. woven rovings I am going to fibreglass the bottom with, up to the bunk framing line. (The pencil line is a bit faint. I inked it in later.) The 'glass won't follow the kinks of the plank seams very well, so I'll just cut it where I have to. The same patterns fit both sides, and I'll do one side at a time. Above the line I'll use the same 6 oz. cloth I used for the outside of the planks.


    Until next time...

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  9. #254
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    OK. This is next time. The spring weather here has been quite nice lately so I have got some fibreglassing done.

    First I made wider fillets along the bottom seams with the curved edge of my putty knife, hoping that the woven rovings would fit into them without my having to cut them at the laps. They did! I cut out the panels of rovings for the bottom of the boat and put them in place, then made newspaper patterns for the sides by resting the lower edge of the paper on the top edge of the rovings. When I cut out the 'glass pieces for the sides I allowed for an inch (25mm) overlap.



    Then I epoxied the bottom panels of the port side while kneeling on the starboard side, and did the starboard side two days later. I gave each side of the bottom three coats of resin on the same day, which took a bit of organising. After each stage I rigged a centre-line between the stems and put some tarpaulins over it to cover the boat, with a couple of these heaters running for a while. I am not going to paint the bottom (bilges). I would rather be able to see what's there.


    Here's the bottom, done. I will go over it to get rid of any spiky bits, but this is how it will look.


    Here I have glassed the starboard topside, and hung up the panels for the port side. It took me four hours to epoxy the first four panels, with a brush, working my way carefully down from the sheer, plank by plank. I didn't have to cut any of these at the laps either. After lunch I gave them a second coat of resin, then epoxied the stern section, which is made up of large scraps. The joints were quite fiddly. I gave this a second coat in the evening. I decided that two coats were sufficient for the topsides as the plywood was well covered.


    And here are a couple of general views of the interior, looking towards the stern,


    and towards the bow. The first four panels above the bunks will form the cabin sides, so they will be sanded and painted. The panels aft of the cabin bulkhead will be covered by the cockpit and after deck, so they will be left plain.


    I am looking forward to seeing some of you at Port Townsend.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  10. #255
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    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rushworth Australia
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Very courageous effort Ian. Did you know it was going to work? If I'd have seen this before doing my boat I might have at least done the outside. Gaboon ply is easily dinged!!
    Have a good trip.

  11. #256
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    Nov 2016
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    Everett, WA, USA
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    419

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian,

    That looks great. And, pretty smart to do all that fiberglass work before the deck goes on.
    Hope to see you Saturday.

    Travis.

  12. #257
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Andrew. Good to hear from you. I thought it would work, or I could make it work. There are some interesting threads on this forum about fibreglassing lapstrake, including yours. The glass on the outside improves the abrasion resistance, and the glass on the inside improves the tensile strength. I'm happy enough with my hull now.
    The Kotik is almost as big as the Grey Seal, and your plywood is thicker, so you should be fine.

    Thanks, Travis. I would hate to be trying to do it with the deck on. I will be building as much of the interior as possible before I even start the deck framing.
    I tried to send you a PM the other day, but it didn't seem to work. You can camp at the Jefferson Fairground without having to book a site. We will be doing that.

    Ian

  13. #258
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    Nov 2016
    Location
    Everett, WA, USA
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    419

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Ian,

    I tried to PM you a couple times - it doesn't seem to be working. Your message came through ok. If I could get it working, I'd send you my cell number.
    There's a chance I might come up Friday evening and stay at Jefferson Fairground. I'm at least planning on going to the PTWBF on Saturday.
    Hope to see you there. I'll keep an eye out for you.

    Travis.

  14. #259
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Travis,
    I just got your PM, thanks, and replied. I think it worked. We are at PT now.
    Ian

  15. #260
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    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    We enjoyed the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival very much, meeting some of you and some of you again, and got home on 20th September after visiting my niece in California the following weekend. Since then, I have sanded the inside of the hull, which took about five days, using my random orbital sander, 60 grit, hand sandpaper, also 60 grit, and coarse steel wool, accompanied by classical music on the radio. Well, you get through it.


    Then I put the centreboard back in, with its permanent winch cable installed. I had shifted the pivot hole, so the board sits higher in the case than it did before. The bolt is stainless steel (316) so I will pull it out after its first season in use and check it for corrosion against the copper-based anti-fouling.

    We had fun making a mock-up of the galley out of all sorts of bits and pieces. The idea is to sit on the c/case (port side), with the galley enclosed in cupboards on the starboard side, with doors hinged along the bottom to drop down and form the working surfaces. The c/case could just as easily have been built on the starboard side with the
    whole thing the other way around.


    In the last week I have made patterns for all the bulkheads, using the moulds and adding small pieces to the sides of the two biggest ones to get a neater fit down the sides, and drawing all the framing pieces on them. Two spare sheets of 3mm MDF came in handy for stations 4 and 6.
    At the companionway bulkhead I have brought the cockpit seats in closer together and raised the sole, to reduce the volume of the foot-well a little. The sole will slope aft instead of forward as in the plan, and I will drain it straight into the motor well, as I did in my Eun na Mara Islesburgh.


    The forward bulkhead will have an archway 2ft (600mm) wide, so the cabin should look fairly open.


    The patterns at stations 1 and 8 are the plywood moulds themselves.


    Well, back to work!
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 10-08-2017 at 10:38 PM. Reason: typo
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  16. #261
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    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rushworth Australia
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    2,543

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    You’re setting a cracking pace Ian. Well done. Bit curious about your cabin layout with the bulkhead at 4, you’re not worried about closing in too much? I assume your bunks are forward of 4 ?
    Top effort with the glass.

  17. #262
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    Jan 2010
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Wow, i would have definately considered doing the bilge area, but would be happy just to give all the ply above that 3 coats of pox, i would find the idea of 5 days sanding enough to put that off, and im too tight to pay someone else to do it! I clear coated the bottom in the planing sail boat, i should have done some more sanding, just sometimes i get a finger sliced on an epoxy barb when mopping out, my wrist/elbow stamina has been reduced by too much by the sanding process. More power to your elbow, looks great!

  18. #263
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Andrew and Ian. I'm happy enough with the hull now, so that's OK.
    The cracking pace goes in fits and starts. The average pace would be somewhat slower.
    We wondered if the "saloon" would feel a bit claustrophobic but the bulkhead at station 4 has a 600mm gap between the posts, so we think it will feel spacious enough. There will not be a central compression post. There will be bunk a (single or double) in the forward cabin and one quarter berth. We don't expect to sleep three but that will give some options.
    The layout will be adapted from the one shown in Iain's catalogue drawing. See message 32, page 1. I have the WB mags with GS Saturday Morning in them, too, showing different layouts.
    Today I drew around the bulkhead patterns onto the real plywood and cut out half of them.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  19. #264
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    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rushworth Australia
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I suppose you also have the advantage in having had a similar sized boat before as well so you can work out more easily what you want.
    I know what you mean about fits and starts, i had a fit once too often!!!

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