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Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #1
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    Default Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hello Everybody,

    It was great to see some of you at the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival last September. We hope to come again, but not this year.

    Having sold my Eun na Mara Islesburgh (the red one) in 2014, and built a Sooty Tern, I was feeling an urge to build a “Kotik”, inspired by the photo Stromborg put on the “Oughtred Kotik” thread of 2011. Andrewpatrol has it on his “Oughtred - Grey Seal” thread too. Bert put some more on “Gartside double-ended cutter #106”, page 5, later. There is some interest in Kotik on this forum but not much real information, so I will try to keep you informed of my progress. The building method is standard Oughtred. My favourite threads are “Oughtred - Grey Seal”, “Building a Wee Seal (very slowly)” and “The Cape Henry 21 building thread”. Thanks, all of you. I must like building boats, or something.

    Kotik is a Wee Seal Mk II, stretched from 18’6” to 21’ 7” long, and 7’3”wide. The word “kotik” is Russian for seal pup, or “wee seal”, as it was a Russian, Mikhael Markov, who instigated it. It is basically a lighter version of the Grey Seal. A brief description is on the Classic Marine (UK) website. I bought the plans last year, which are for the Wee Seal Mk II with three extra sheets for the lines plan, construction plan and sloop sail plan of the Kotik. Later I received the Kotik yawl sail plan, the alternative 3-berth interior, and off-sets for the planking laps on the moulds and stems. The yawl has a jib-headed mizzen sheeted to the rudder, and a Norwegian tiller. You have to loft the hull, as it has a new lines drawing which does not fit the Wee Seal moulds, and the stems have more rake.

    There is a standard 2-berth (double or twin) interior, with space for either a navigation station or an enclosed “head”, opposite the galley, just inside the companionway. I am planning to build the 3-berth version, which has quarter berths and a separate forward cabin with a third berth and space for a toilet (e.g., Porta Potti). The forward cabin can also be used as a double, in which case the toilet could be put in the main cabin just below the companion hatch, which is where we had it in our Eun na Mara, with a plywood lid as a step in from the cockpit, and a bottle of hand sanitiser. (Taking a trowel for a walk was the usual way to go.)

    You can see my Eun na Mara Islesburgh (the red one) and Sooty Tern Trondra, on www.alistego.com, www.geoss.co.au/Eun_Mara and the thread here “Southern Sooty Tern”. There have been some unforeseen delays in starting the Kotik, but I’m onto it now.

    On 29th April 2016 I got my Sooty Tern building frame down from the rafters and converted it to a lofting table with three sheets of 16mm construction plywood, as specified for the moulds. I covered them with three sheets of 3mm MDF which I have used as the lofting surface. I did not paint them first, as I thought my lines would show up well enough, but the rubbed out lines still show up pretty well too. You do have to change a lot of them as you go along.
    The four-foot width of the boards was sufficient to loft the hull without the keel, forepeak and rudder-head, so I added bits on later to include those. I drew the body plan on a fourth sheet, (scrive board, pronounced “screeve board”, as all the books say) lined up with the middle one of the three, so the nails I used to mark the off-sets marked both sheets at the same time. Later I filled in the body plan on the lower sheet as well.

    After I had lofted and faired the lines, I drew the bulkheads, bunk tops, centre case, cockpit sole and seats, and floors onto the lofting to see how they all fitted. You can put as many parts as you like into the lofting. You just have to decide when to stop. As others have said, it really does help you to think about what you have to do, before you build it.

    Yesterday I removed the 3mm drawing boards from the table-top, cut the scrive board in half, cut out the three biggest mould halves from it and drew around them onto the 16mm plywood, to make the complete moulds. I had to be careful to get the two halves centred and lined up correctly, to match the off-sets. I will be able to get some of the smaller moulds out of the middles of them.

    Watch this space for photos. I have to brush up my technique for posting them.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 08-11-2016 at 06:19 AM.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    good onya Ian, looking fwd to this. Any engine at all? It sounds like there arent any frames? Ian actually said to me once that he thought GS could be built without them too. Dunno about that cos theres not a lot of internal structure. I reckon the hull has moved already just sitting there. actually i reckon if again id put temporary braces across hull.

    Good luck

    A

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Will definately be watching this. I bought Kotik plans some years ago after a good long time considering a trailer sailer, and then drew up plans for a lighter boat based on a Danish beach pram; of which some parts have been fabricated and awaiting setting up molds.
    Nice spot in the world, have family in Omaru. Cheers , Ian.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Andrew and Ian.
    I am enjoying your thread, Andrew. Good work! Kotik has bulkheads at most stations, and I will probably put in a laminated frame or two. It has an o/b motor in a well, the same as Eun Mara. Islesburgh had (has) a 6hp 4-stroke Tohatsu. Kotik will have the same, or Yamaha, whatever, but it will have to be a long-shaft this time. A 6hp o/b weighs 25 or 27 kg., which is plenty heavy enough for me.
    I got your question about the Kotik compared to Grey Seal. I have the WB mags 128, 129, & 130, about building GS Saturday Morning. Kotik is really a lighter version of GS. You can see the 3-berth Kotik layout on http://nisboats.com/oughtred/pics/la...wgs/Kotik1.jpg . Kotik has lead ballast of 790 lb (360 kg). (Wee Seal has 310 kg.) They also both have 60 lb (27 kg) of lead in the (wooden) centreboard. The c/b is offset so there is no slot in the lead ballast. Displacement at DWL is 1180 kg. The garboard is 12mm, the rest of the planking is 9mm. Otherwise I think they're pretty similar. My wife has a brother living in Melbourne.
    Ian, good to hear from you. I thought I might. Let's know if you are ever coming to visit your family. We sailed our EM from Dunedin to Oamaru and back a couple of times. It was 50 nautical miles each way.
    Cheers, Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    And now for some photos.............


    1. The Building Frame


    2. The Lofting Table


    3. The Lofting Board


    4. The First Line Appears
    5. The Profile
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    And some more...


    6. Tools of the Trade



    Sorry, run out of time right now.... More to come.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Looking forward to following your progress. That is a very nice looking shop you have there, I like the natural lighting.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    bravo Ian, also another vote for your workshop. When does a shop become a shed? Has it got to do with hemesphere or building type.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Looks lovely, Ian. Perhaps I can drop by some time, once you've splashed her.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Seeing as you're already up to the lofting, that means just a couple months more, right?

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Steve, Andrew and James. Yes, it's a good shed/workshop/shop, whichever dialect you speak. That's why we live here.
    James, We hope you're enjoying Singapore. You're welcome to call in any time you're passing by. (You're only 5000 miles away now.) I'm aiming for two years. All I have to do now is build it.
    Cheers, Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 06-12-2016 at 11:16 PM.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    And now for some more photos....

    8. Rudder Fittings.


    9. Pattern Making (Those brown things are blocks of lead wrapped in parcel tape.)


    10. Wallpaper Patterns.


    11. Body Plan.


    12. Completed Lofting.

    Well, that's the lofting, as far as I need to go at present. I'll do some more work tomorrow. Cheers, Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Time has been a bit catch-as-catch-can, but will start to improve now.
    I got all the moulds except one out of the three sheets of 16mm plywood that were the drawing table. Number 7 is 12mm MDF left over from the Sooty Tern. (MDF stays straighter than plywood.)
    Here are a few more thousand words....


    13. The Lofting Table again.


    14. Drawing Mould 5


    15. Mould 6 coming up.


    16 Patterns 1 - 5


    17. Drawing Moulds 1 & 2.


    18. Trimming Mould 3.

    I'm only allowed 6 images, so I'll continue in the morning. Cheers, Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Ian, congratulations on making a very good start. She looks like another great design from Iain. I'll be eagerly following along with everyone else here. As I was checking the forum I noticed the Grey Seal thread right next to this one. It'll be interesting to see these two boats coming together side by side.

    Dale

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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Dale. I'm looking forward to it too. I'm hoping to be able to build it fairly efficiently now.

    And now for some more photos (I'll put the labels at the top now) ......

    19. Cutting out another Mould.


    20. Moulds 3 and 4.


    21. Moulds 6, 8, 9 and 7.


    Moulds 5, 2 & 1.


    That's all the photos for now. Now to set them up .....
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Ian, you're moving along very well, just a pointer if I may. I found it handy to be able to get under boat to clean up epoxy as I put on planks. Leave enough room for clambering over and under.

    i notice Kotik has one of those offset centreboards on your lofting. Should make construction a bit easier than going through keel.
    What is the centreboard made from? And how much ballast does she have?
    Last edited by andrewpatrol; 06-20-2016 at 06:04 PM.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Andrew. Yes, it is best to clean up the epoxy inside the planking as you go, as much as possible. The Kotik plan calls for a frame 4 ft wide but this one is 3 ft, so the side planking will extend out enough to clean up a lot of the inside without getting right inside the frame. It's a bit low at the top end because the floor slopes to match the street outside. Yes, you have to clamber around on it now and then. I will strut the wider moulds to the floor at the sides. This is the third boat I have built on this frame.

    Here's one for you, if I may. When you do the foredeck, assuming that the kingplank is concave like the afterdeck, you can do it in two pieces of plywood with a butt join down the middle, with the centre lines of each half cut slightly concave so you can push it down in the middle. It worked fine on my Eun na Mara. I also assume you will fibreglass the decks. (That's a beautiful nib-scarf you did.)

    Yes, the centreboard is offset to port. The port bunk is built onto that side of the case, and it leaves a decent walkway along the other
    side. The c/board is made from hardwood boards edge-joined with bronze rods and drifts. Very solid and traditional. It has 60lb/27kg lead in the bottom end. I am thinking of making it of plywood , but wondering if that would be strong enough to hold all that lead. No doubt Iain drew it that way for good reason. As you say, it's a chance to try another method.

    The main ballast is a big bar of lead, 5" (125mm) square x 7' (2.1m) long, 360 kg, which is double what the EM has. It's a simple rectangular shape, easier to cast than yours. I will build the mould and get it cast at a foundry. It only has 6 12mm bronze bolts to hold that weight. I expect all that powerful flexible adhesive you bed it on helps.
    Cheers, Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 06-21-2016 at 04:52 AM. Reason: add "enough"
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Just so I understand you Ian, if I'm looking at foredeck in plan view the ends of join would be touching and centre would be distanced apart so's you could stand a pencil in. Does it close up when you push it down? I thought for a moment that you meant a cove along inside of butt so it fills with more epoxy! Don't ask me what or why I'm thinking that.
    did you get your EM ballast done at foundry too? Just wondering if it was cost effective? Hardest thing I found about pouring my own was collecting all the wheel weights. But if another build comes up and it's not too exxy I'd think about farming it out.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    This should be good! Your pictures and writing style are excellent. I love your shop. Large, lots of light, complete with paintings on the walls and curtains on the windows. A class act!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Andrew. You are right. The ends would be touching and the middle would have a gap, but not necessarily as wide as a pencil. What you do, is draw a centre line down the kingplank, dry-fasten one half of the deck in position with enough screws or weights around the edge to keep it down all around, and see how much the middle of the centre edge of the plywood laps over the centre line of the kingplank. Then draw a new, curved, c/l on the plywood, take it off and make a matching pair.
    After I had done mine that way, I put some filler in the joint, put a layer of lightweight f/glass over the deck for a bit of texture and painted it.
    Cheers, Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Quote Originally Posted by andrewpatrol View Post
    Just so I understand you Ian, if I'm looking at foredeck in plan view the ends of join would be touching and centre would be distanced apart so's you could stand a pencil in. Does it close up when you push it down? I thought for a moment that you meant a cove along inside of butt so it fills with more epoxy! Don't ask me what or why I'm thinking that.
    did you get your EM ballast done at foundry too? Just wondering if it was cost effective? Hardest thing I found about pouring my own was collecting all the wheel weights. But if another build comes up and it's not too exxy I'd think about farming it out.
    If you buy ingots Andrew, the hard part is done.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for that, Rich. I enjoy your contributions too. I followed your HV13 thread before I joined the forum. Excellent job! I hope you are having a good summer with her. I met Eric at a Port Townsend WBF and bought his HV16 plans to study, but I had already started my Sooty Tern. I like Eric's designs too.
    Yes, it's a great workshop. It was built about 1947 as a taxi depot with an open front. The guys who were light engineers here for 20 years before us closed in the front with those big windows. People can look in as they walk past, which I don't mind in the daytime, but the curtains are good at night to avoid the "gold-fish bowl" feeling. The paintings are old faded ones from op-shops. I like the two Brueghel ones. We bought the place in 2002, before I retired, and it took two years to fix the house and tidy the place up.
    Cheers, Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    NIce progress Ian. Watching from afar....

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    The building jig is finished now. After assembling the moulds, I stood them up on the building frame at the station marks, with G-clamps tight enough to stop them falling over but loose enough to let them move sideways a little when tapped with a hammer on the end of the stretcher, and lined them up on the centre string-line. Then I tightened up the clamps to hold the moulds in position, and built the end profiles, which are attached rigidly to the end moulds and the ends of the building frame. A couple of the square corner offcuts from the plywood made good braces for mould 4, (which happened to coincide with parts of the frame that prevented the easy fitting of a post), with posts at the other moulds. I just put one screw at the bottom of each post into the upper parts of the rails (to allow the moulds to rock a little fore and aft), connected up the tops of the moulds at the correct spacings, so that they were all vertical, put another screw in the bottom of each post at the lower part of the rail, and installed the diagonal braces on all the moulds.

    Lastly I gauged a line 32mm (1 ¼ in.) in from the edge of each mould to mount blocks on if I decide to make a laminated frame on any of them, and drilled holes for clamping the outer edges of the planks as I install them. I will leave the sides open at this stage so that I can stand on the rails to do the garboards and as much as possible of the keel and deadwood before the rest of the planking.

    The plans show long plywood knees from under the side decks down the insides of the hull at a couple of the stations, but I might make laminated frames instead, with knees at the tops.

    We are getting a cover made for Sooty Tern Trondra, so she can go and live outside. The next task is to buy a pile of timber and plywood.

    Well, after all that, they say a picture is worth a thousand words, so here are a few more thousand words....











    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    12 July 2016

    Last Tuesday the new cover was made for Trondra, so she moved outside. She is now at our “private jetty” (haha), which was made for servicing cars. It was very useful for Islesburgh. You could step straight onto the deck.

    Anyway, since I’ve had more room to work, I have fitted blocks to moulds 2, 3, 5 and 6, to support laminated frames at those stations. (There will be bulkheads at the other stations.) Mould 5 had some unwanted curvature, which might have twisted the frames, so I have straightened and stiffened it up with some extra pieces of wood. I might be able to take some of them off again later, for standing on the rails. (MDF stays straighter.)

    One of the local timber (lumber) and hardware suppliers has kwila (merbau) decking planks in 140mm and 90mm widths by 19mm thick, and lengths in increments of 300mm (5½”, 3½”, ¾”, 12”), so I bought some of those and cut the strips for laminating the inner and outer stems and the frames. I certainly needed a dust mask for that job! Earmuffs too. I got nine 40 x 3mm or six 60 x 3mm strips out of a 140mm plank, plus plenty of sawdust for the garden. I have three long planks for the keelson and other pieces for the floors. The tops of the planks are grooved for the decking but where two of the grooved pieces are in the same lamination I can turn them into each other and they interlock. I have also made the form for the forward stems.

    A load of plywood is due to arrive from Christchurch tomorrow or the next day. I am almost ready to have a big glue-up, but will wait until the plywood is here so I don’t get interrupted. I will have to use some fan-heaters, as the workshop is too cold in the mornings and rarely gets above 8°C (45F) during the day.

    Tomorrow I will make a pile of scrap plywood U-clamps and wedges, for the laminations, and tape up the four moulds with parcel-tape.


    The view out the back.


    The wide open spaces.


    Cheers, Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    21 July 2016
    After making the plywood clamps and wedges, I finally arrived at the first big glue-up. After doing those little jobs that you always have to do before you can do the thing you set out to do, I glued the frames yesterday afternoon and evening until 11 p.m. I have nine laminations in each frame. (I can recommend Stromborg’s method, steaming three thicker layers and gluing them when cooled.) I am using WEST system resin with fast hardener, and I play a fan-heater onto the resin containers and another couple over the gluing bench, while I am doing it. I left them alone today and will clean them up tomorrow. They are at stations 2, 3, 5 and 6 (6 because I don’t know how much will be left of the bulkhead with the cutouts for the quarter berths).

    22 July
    Today I trimmed the keelson ends of the frames first so they would go back in the same places, and then took them off the moulds and cleaned them
    up with my electric plane and belt sander. I’ll put them through the thicknesser and router table yet, but tomorrow is glue-up day for the stems!

    Well, I was going to post some photos, but I can't seem to get the link addresses tonight.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Here are the photos up to 22 July:
    Well, sorry, it still doesn't work. I can put the photos into Flickr but I can't get the menu with "Copy Image Location" on it.
    Anyway, I spent most of Saturday tweaking the set-up and rehearsing the clamping procedure, and on Sunday afternoon and evening I got the inner and outer stems glued up and clamped in place. This morning (Tuesday) I took the stems off the jigs and pulled the plastic off them, took the jigs apart and cleaned up the mess. We had to go out after that. Tomorrow I will clean the excess glue off the stems the same way as for the frames, and mill the keelson out of three kwila decking planks.
    Now I'll have another go at the photos....

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    OK. Here are the frame photos.

    Dry run.



    Gluing bench (making sandwiches).






    Frames glued up.


    Keelson slots trimmed.


    Frames off the moulds.


    Cleaning up.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  29. #29
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    Mar 2015
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    284

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    and here is the latest lot...

    Frames cleaned up with power plane and belt sander.

    Fore-stems, inner and outer. Dry assembly.


    Aft stems, inner and outer. Dry assembly.


    Fore stems glued up.


    Aft stems, glued up.

    Stems off the moulds.


    And one more ...
    Last edited by IanMilne; 07-26-2016 at 05:25 PM.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    284

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Now I'll go out to the workshop and make another big mess, dressed like this. You'll recognise me anywhere! I made the Sooty Tern stems out of big pieces of macrocarpa glued together, and it was really a lot easier, but I couldn't get hardwood to make these ones that way.



    And off to work we go.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  31. #31
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    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    284

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    9 August 2016

    Sorry, I’m getting a bit behind with my postings.

    The stems came out OK, and I have cleaned them up with electric plane and belt sander. I rounded off the inner corners on my router table but nearly had a disaster when the cutter crept up on its shaft and made a deep gouge in one of the stems. A good thing it wasn’t a frame. It’s the top end of the aft stem so I will bog it up when I do the filling and filleting after I have turned the hull over. It will be out of sight under the after deck, so don’t tell anybody, will you!

    I made the keelson laminations out of three kwila decking planks trimmed down to 4” x 5/8” (100 x 16mm) and fitted the stems to the first layer, then today I glued up the keelson and clamped it along the top of the moulds and to the stems, so the shape of the boat is fixed now. I have “laid the keel”! I have not glued it to the stems, so I can lift it off and clean it up on the bench, as “andrewpatrol” did with his. It will also have extra reinforcing pieces along each side over the ballast, so I will just smooth up the sides and put it back on the moulds to fit and glue those pieces, then take it off again to clean up the whole thing, then put it back on and glue it to the stems. Phew! I will then be able to glue the frames to the keelson and make the floors that coincide with the moulds. I have transferred all the reference lines for the waterlines and planking lines to the stems and will do the same to the frames tomorrow, so that I can “lift the bevels off my lofting”. (I read that somewhere.)

    I have got my pile of plywood now too, and a stack of New Zealand grown European oak for the keel, deadwood and centre-board. We drove to another town for that, about a three-hour drive each way. I couldn’t get 9mm 7ply like I used for my Eun na Mara Islesburgh, so I had to get 9mm 5ply, which seems to be what most people use anyway, but I will probably fibreglass the outside, at least the first two or three planks. I didn’t see any need to do that with the Islesburgh. The garboard of the Kotik is 12mm, so it will need a 3mm step in the stems, as Iain O mentions for his dory designs.

    Enough words for now. I’ll sort out some pictures tomorrow.

    Cheers, Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  32. #32
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    Mar 2015
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    This is what we are talking about.


    Forward stems, inner and outer.


    The oak arriving.


    This a scrap of the plywood I couldn't get this time.


    One of many frosty mornings. It's not cold by some of your standards, but it's cold! There was snow here one day, and there's plenty of that just inland from here.


    Fitting the stems to the keelson.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  33. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    284

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Here we are, right up to date.

    The temperature under the tent got up to 15 degrees C. (59F.).


    Ready for the next move.
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  34. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rushworth Australia
    Posts
    2,553

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    looking great Ian, you're really moving. I expect you'll be planked in about two weeks

  35. #35
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    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    284

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Andrew. Here's hoping! After the garboard, I want to build as much of the forefoot and deadwood as possible before I plank the sides.
    Cheers, Ian
    Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

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