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Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #281
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian, It's good to see how you're getting on and to compare the decisions you've been making about the interior etcetera.

    I've also been getting on with my Kotik, which will be called Mariota after the Queen of the Western Isles c 1380, wife of Donald the Lord of the Isles.

    I decided early on to abandon the idea of a self-draining, unsinkable ship for several reasons. In a hull of this shape you have to watch out for water coming in to the cockpit when you're heeled, either by raising the sole or by sloping the front faces of the seats to bring the deepest part inboard. As a result of the raised sole the seats will be at quite a high level and I prefer to sit well out of the wind, which is very cold here in Argyll.

    Have a look at Albert Strange on self-draining cockpits, as he makes a lot of sense. If you get a big sea into one the ship becomes instantly top heavy, until it drains out, unless you have very big drains. If it drained right down into the cabin you would be very stable but of course very wet in your living area, so I've compromised and not installed limber holes.

    I've built a good sized bridge deck quite high up, to keep water out of the cabin as much as possible, also envisage normal sailing with a washboard or two installed.

    The bulkhead at Station Three is water-tight up to a couple of feet, i.e. again no limber holes.

    I want quite a bit of storage space, so have left the area under the stern deck accessible.

    In a wee boat like this I think it's a mistake to have too many berths. There's a main berth to starboard with storage underneath and a possible second one under the foredeck to port. I don't expect ever to have a third person sleeping aboard but it would be possible simply on the cabin sole to port, which is basically open. Of course with the self draining cockpit you get two quarter berths if you want, at the expense of losing storage in the cockpit.

    At the forward end of the cabin to port is space for the sardine stove, which with luck may arrive in my lifetime.

    I've added a couple of photos taken from the forward end. In the front of the first one is the mast post, made from a beam salvaged from the Ardrishaig distillery that came down about thirty years ago. The deck beams are also made from this old growth pitch pine, which is lovely stuff that lasts for ever. It will end up oiled to give a nice finish.

    quot homines tot sententiae!

    Ewan
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Ewan G Kennedy

  2. #282
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian , you’re doing such a speedy job compared to my fumbling. I expect you will over take me sometime soon.
    Just on the winch for centreboard, I have found one that is used for things like a manual fork-lift which has a brake inside it so when weight is on the line it doesn’t turn. Looks like a boat trailer winch. If I rememeber I‘ll Put a picture on my thread.
    On another Grey Seal that I saw pictures of was the most ingenious setup I’ve seen to date. Ill try to explain it.
    Over the top of centreboard was a tube about 1 1/2” diameter in the for/aft orientation that ran in plain bearings of some sort and the hoist line was wrapped around it. That tube went through the #6 bulkhead to under the bridge deck and had a large wheel attached that had a line turning it from the cockpit. So simple and enclosed. Sort of a drum winch.

  3. #283
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!



    Marianita has twin bilge boards, each one has a small worm-drive winch much like this one, rated for 1500lbs/700kg more importantly the drum stays where it is when you stop cranking. My metric to inches conversion is weak, they are about 6"x6"x4". Not terribly fast up and down but the speed isn't much of a factor when out sailing, I did try a battery operated drill with a socket last summer, that turned out to be a very slick way to go. I don't remember if I pointed them out to Ian when he was aboard in Port Townsend last September.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  4. #284
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Yes that looks very similar to mine Steve. Does your handle go on side of winch or top?

    64E72F22-2525-419E-ABBF-C4A28C4E627C.jpg

    I can see a few skinned knees going in/out companionway.

  5. #285
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Two days later, the filleting is done, as far as possible for now. It's good to have that little chore out of the way.


    Ewan, You're doing very well too.

    I like the idea of using one of those historical local names for your boat. (I used to be in the Gaelic Society here, but it is not going any more.)

    Thanks for all your thoughts. I take your point about a serious pooping keeping the boat stable if it goes into the bottom of the boat, but I still prefer a self-draining cockpit, or semi-self-draining anyway, with storage space under the sole, with buoyancy as a bonus. I drained my Eun na Mara Islesburgh's cockpit straight into the motor well, with a removable plug. Sometimes it was a good way to catch rain water during the night. If we had ever got a serious wave over the side I could have quickly pulled the plug out. I had sloped the cockpit sole towards the stern, and we kept the plug in when using the boat as the sole there was only a little above the waterline and with the plug out it scooped up water when launching the boat off the trailer. Even with the plug in, water would not come higher than the motor well. Not for very long anyway. The Kotik sole will have more clearance at the stern.





    Don't worry, we did some good trips and we watched the weather forecasts carefully. I had an electric bilge pump in the bottom of the boat just behind the cabin bulkhead (with limber holes) but the pump never got water anywhere near it. I will use the same system in my Kotik. (Sorry, Travis - "Zuri".) I will have a look at hand bilge pumps, and carry a bucket. There will be a sub-deck in the stern at motor-mount level, for buoyancy, and closed storage space above that.

    I have raised the companionway sill 75mm (3"), and moved the seats closer together at the forward end, but they are still the same height, which is 150mm (6") below the sheer at the cabin bulkhead. I expect to be lowering the motor mounting 50mm (2"). The motor dotted in on the plans is significantly smaller than the one I will be using.

    I never intend to sleep three people on board. The quarter berth is just to provide an option for us oldies. The "trotter box" will be mainly for throwing things into.

    A "Sardine" wood-burning stove will be nice to have.

    Vendia Planking! Pitch pine! I'm jealous!

    I wasn't very good at Latin at school so I looked up your quote. Yes, very true. I have been acquainted with several Eun na Maras in Australia, Canada and at Port Townsend, and they are built from the same plans but they all come out with different details. I see on your blog that you have one in your group too.

    'Bye for now.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  6. #286
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Andrew and Steve,

    Yes, I'm having a fairly good run at the Kotik-building just now, thanks, Andrew.
    Thanks for your suggestions about winches. That one you found looks as if it will work well mounted on the side of the top part of your c/case, and I like that other arrangement too. I can see how it could work on Kotik.

    Thanks for your winch picture too, Steve. No, we didn't study your winches in September, but I took a photo of one from the pontoon when you weren't there (and some other details). That looks very neat.


    I liked being able to operate our Eun na Mara drum-winches from the cockpit, by lines through the bulkhead. Here is the system my friend Bob Lewis made for his centreboard-version Eun na Mara Morna, that we went to the launching of in Portland Australia in May 2015, and I sailed with him at Canberra in April 2016. This is inside the bridge deck.


    You can see more of this on http://www.geoss.com.au/eun_mara/bob...ard_suspension, and the winches for my Islesburgh on ​the same site http://www.geoss.com.au/eun_mara/ian_dunedin3.htm (This is Richard Almond's website.)

    Time for bed.
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 11-27-2017 at 06:21 PM. Reason: spelling
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #287
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!



    This is the port side winch and the "tower" I built to keep water out. The tops the bilgeboard trunks are only a couple of inches above the DWL so when the boat heels over water floods into the tower, draining back out on the other tack. But that shouldn't be an issue with a centerboard. With my long push/pull tiller I can sail with one hand and work the boards with the other if I feel the need, but generally they get lowered to start the day and raised at the end.

    If one wanted to get particularly clever a small electric motor could be fitted.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  8. #288
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post







    Don't worry, we did some good trips and we watched the weather forecasts carefully. I had an electric bilge pump in the bottom of the boat just behind the cabin bulkhead (with limber holes) but the pump never got water anywhere near it. I will use the same system in my Kotik. (Sorry, Travis - "Zuri".) I will have a look at hand bilge pumps, and carry a bucket. There will be a sub-deck in the stern at motor-mount level, for buoyancy, and closed storage space above that.


    Ian
    You mean the outboard or scuppers? Either way, I'd do the same if I were building a Kotik. Yours is looking fantastic and this is a great stage to be at. It's nice to see the bulkheads in place and the interior starting to take shape. Keep up the good work.

    Travis.

  9. #289
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Travis.

  10. #290
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian

    Thanks for your comments and sorry I've not been on here for a while.

    It's fascinating how different people go about the same problems and of course any wee cruising boat is going to be full of compromises. I will need a cockpit cover and am installing a pump in the cockpit, draining into the motor well.

    I'm lucky to have a brand new two stroke outboard that I bought about twenty years ago and never used on Stroma, as it didn't seem polite to expose an old lady to such indignity and I enjoyed the strange spots we had to anchor in when we ran out of wind and daylight. It's much lighter than the new four strokes, which I couldn't comfortably lift into place and won't get enough use to damage the environment too much.

    All the best

    Ewan
    Ewan G Kennedy

  11. #291
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ewan,

    My statement that I will "use the same system in my Kotik" is perhaps not very clear. I will drain the cockpit into the motor well, but will not have an electric bilge pump. I will see if I can find a hand-operated pump of decent capacity, in addition to the usual bucket.

    Cruising on the West Coast of Scotland would be fascinating. A picture of Stroma, please!

    What is the make, h.p. and weight of your motor? I picked up my motor last Friday. It's a 4 stroke, and certainly bigger than the one Iain has dotted in on the plans, which was also the case with my Eun na Mara, Islesburgh, with the earlier model of the same motor.It's an Evinrude/Tohatsu 6 h.p. and weighs 25 kg., which is as much as I want to lift and not any more often than I have to. More about that later.

    While waiting for my motor, I went on with the framing in the forward cabin and the "saloon". I hadn't been too sure how I was going to do it, so I just let it evolve. Some bits are Oregon (Douglas fir) and some are macrocarpa. Here are some piccies:

    Starboard side, "settee" and walkway.


    Climbing in and out is much easier now. This is a piece of construction plywood left over from re-decking my common or garden trailer about five years ago.


    Port side, centreboard case and quarter-berth.


    The forward cabin, using some plywood off-cuts.


    Rail to support forward bunk. There will be another bulkhead along the nearer part of the diagonal, and a removable infill panel to make a double.


    Thinking about the cockpit again. I am using stainless steel screws for dry assemblies and to hold the framing together while the glue sets, and leaving them in. These seat-rails and the bulkheads at Stations 7 and 8 are not glued in yet.


    I can continue working on the stern now.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-05-2017 at 03:07 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  12. #292
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Nice progress Ian.
    And good inspirations for me too ;-)

    Max

  13. #293
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Good work Ian , now slow down you’re showing me up.

  14. #294
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Max. Glad it might inspire you. I want to keep the interior pretty simple.
    And thanks Andrew. I'm theoretically full-time on Kotik, but there are always plenty of interruptions, so I have to make progress when I can.

    I had a big glue-up of all the framing battens on the back of the motor bulkhead (stn 8) the other night and have glued bulkheads 7 and 8 in now.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  15. #295
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Some progress has been made. It's a busy time of the year.

    Just for comparison, here is the motor of my Eun Mara Islesburgh. It's a 2004 Tohatsu 6 hp, 4-stroke, standard shaft, essentially the same engine as I have now for my Kotik.I put it on the starboard side to have the tiller in the middle, forgetting that you don't steer with it anyway. Others have put theirs on the port side, but the tiller gets in the way of the seat a bit. The different sheets of the plans seem to show it on either side, so take your pick. On Islesburgh, the gear lever was awkward to use, even with the fairly primitive extension I made for it. (Stromborg's is better.) When I started building the Kotik, I thought I was going to put the motor on the port side, to make the gear-change easier to get to, and it seemed a good idea to have the off-centreboard on the same side, so I put the board on the port side. However, on Kotik Pura Vida in June, I discovered that the new model of the motor has the gear-change lever extended around to the front, which I like, and an oversized tiller, which I don't like so much, but can live with. So back to the starboard side went my motor. Thanks, Greg.

    I used the mould for Kotik station 8 to make a mock-up of the bulkhead cut-out for the new motor, which is still made by Tohatsu but added to the Evinrude range. After a lot of playing around, this is the final version. The well and cut-out are of the same dimensions as in the plans but on the other side, with the tiller in the middle instead of over the seat. This is also a standard shaft motor. The length from the mounting beam to the cavitation plate is 17" (430 mm), so I lowered the bulkhead mounting 2" (50 mm). The long-shaft motor is too long, at 22" (560 mm). It puts the propeller too close to the ground and the motor comes up above the deck. I will probably have the tiller in the vertical position most of the time when using the boat, where the twist-grip throttle can be used just as well. (There will be a coaming, higher than the deck, so the long tiller is OK.)


    Trial fit in the bulkhead. It fits!


    And the delivery end. Anything up to an inch (25mm) lower would be good, but I didn't want to lower the mounting any more than I had to. Islesburgh's motor was like this and it worked OK. Cutting the hole didn't hurt too much.


    This is the trial assembly of the motor well, and starting to figure out the position of the mizzen mast socket. Iain's yawl sail plan shows the mizzen mast further forward than on the Eun Mara, so it is beside the motor well rather than aft of it. The only way I can do that is to put the mizzen mast off-centre, which is not unusual in small yawls. There are other things off-centre on this boat already! If the motor was on the port side, the mast could be on the centreline, but I still prefer to have the motor on the starboard side.


    This is the motor well all glued up, and a rough trial assembly of the mizzen socket. I haven't figured out how to build the step yet. It will also need a drain into the motor well. The motor bears against the remains of an old oak bed-end glued across the back of the bulkhead. There will also be a kwila "pad" on the front of the bulkhead for the clamps to do up on.



    Well, there won't be much more done this week.

    Wishing you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-29-2017 at 03:50 AM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  16. #296
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hello Ian, Little by little, but some big leaps too. The factor I'd consider (maybe too late) in engine placement is the turning moment of the prop. If clockwise turning the prop wants to turn you to port and having the prop on the port side tends to turn you starboard, so putting that engine on the port side tends to leave the helm neutral.

  17. #297
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Nice work Ian. Many outboard makers now putting the gear shift on the front like that, i think it makes a lot of sense, meaning you can sit either side of a cockpit if using the tiller and still have immediate access to the shift control.
    Will you make up a fairing plug around the leg, rubber gasket?

  18. #298
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian

    It's fascinating to see how the interior is coming along and it's a real challenge working out how put a quart into a pint pot.

    I've got a vaguely similar arrangement to yours up front, where a removable section should make it just possible for a shortish person to sleep in some discomfort, whereas your infill creates a nice double. I can imagine that I may need to give up my own berth in the main part to a friend and curl up in the front myself. The benefit from this discomfort in my layout is a slightly bigger open area of cabin.

    Also, I think these things develop organically as the build goes along and one experiments with head height, foot room and so on inside the hull as it comes along.

    Re your outboard question what I bought for Stroma and didn't use was a 3.3 hp Mariner that weighs about 15 kg, I guess. It happens to be a long shaft, which was good for Stroma but not needed for the Kotik and raises the top of the motor a bit too high, but I'm not caring. I don't think it will get used much.

    Stroma is one of the Scottish Islands OD Class, number 4 of five launched in May 1929, which I have owned since 1976 and she's been on sale now for five or six years. I'm looking for someone competent and in tune with these things to take her to her hundredth birthday. I've annexed pics of her racing in the early days, at Crinan in 2008 with her nutshell tender and in 2004 in Loch Spelve, where three identical old yachts sailed in to the plastic fleet of the Royal Highland Yacht Club and neatly anchored side by side with no problems.

    I've got a special blog for the Islanders, www.scottishislandclass.blogspot.co.uk and a general blog www.scottishboating.blogspot.co.uk if you've got time to waste.

    Best wishes

    Ewan

    Stroma in regatta 1930s.jpgStroma at Crinan 2008.jpgRHYC Muster_Spelve 2004 no 1.jpg
    Ewan G Kennedy

  19. #299
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    sorry, mistake, www.scottishislandsclass.blogspot.co.uk should work
    Ewan G Kennedy

  20. #300
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hello Thad, Thanks for watching, and for your comments.
    Here is a photo of my friend Bob Lewis's Eun na Mara Morna in Australia, from Richard Almond's website.


    Bob put his motor on the port side for the reasons you mention. He has notched it into the cockpit seat, and the tiller is smaller than mine. I think if mine was at the side like that, it would catch on things, as well as being generally in the way. I have not asked Bob if he has noticed any "prop-walk" effect. I have seen on a modern fin-keeler how the prop-walk was used to kick the stern sideways, but I did not notice any of these effects on Islesburgh, so I did not regard it as a significant factor. Perhaps that was because of the large deadwood beside the propeller, and Kotik has the same arrangement. When I started, I thought I would put the motor on the port side, so I put the off-centreboard on that side, to have them both on the same line, but now the drag of the board beside the keel, even when retracted, will probably take me around in circles! Oh well, I'll just have to learn how she behaves. The turning circle is tighter on the side that the motor is, because then the thrust bears directly onto the rudder. Thanks for your thoughts. Your thoughts are always welcome!

    Ian (Skara), (We drove up through Sweden from Gothenburg to Stockholm in 2004, past that huge lake, so we might have been not far from you. We've also been to Skara Brae in Orkney. ) Thanks for your comment. I haven't seen other motors with the gear-shift on the front. I am not particularly intending to close off the motor well, with or without the motor in it. I think your suggestion of an inflated inner tube around the motor stem is a good one, but leaving the well open was not a problem with Islesburgh, which might be something to do with the angle of the planking there. If we ever get seriously pooped I would rather let the water escape freely through the motor well, at least to that level. I won't try to test that!

    Ewan, Thanks for the info. and pictures. I see in your previous message that your motor well is on the starboard side too. The motor Iain has dotted in on the Kotik plans is obviously a 2-stroke.
    With the planking, you get into the swing of it, but after that, everything is a different problem! But that's alright.
    The Scottish Islands class is very handsome, and your Stroma looks very well maintained. I like the colour too, and the matching tender. I see she's the figurehead on your Scottish Boating blog. You've got good stuff on that.

    Today I am putting three coats of epoxy on the inside surfaces of the parts for the mizzen mast socket, and will glue it up on the third one. I'll go and check the first coat now.

    Cheers for Christmas!
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  21. #301
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Here's a bit more "little by little".

    I decided to bring the mizzen mast in as close as possible to the centreline, so that the load of it would be at least partly on the stern stem. The block of wood fills the gap between the housing and the motor well.


    Here is the partly glued-up mizzen housing, dry-assembled in place. The rake is 4 degrees. (Wee Seal has 3 degrees.)


    Trial-fitting the motor. The tiller handle will fold back against the mizzen mast, out of the way. I will have to shape the motor hatch-cover accordingly. The mizzen housing will form part of the enclosure for the motor head. I will leave a gap at the back of the cover to allow air to flow through.


    Side view of the motor in relation to the bulkhead. After this I put the motor away until the boat is finished.


    I drilled a drain hole through the block into the motor well, and lined it with a piece of 1/2" (12mm) copper pipe. I have made the step high enough to be above the water-line (I hope).


    I enclosed the rest of the space under the forward berth with offcuts of plywood. You can also see some of the thin strips of kwila which are glued and filletted all around the boat to support the outer edges of the bunks, cockpit seats and the sub-deck at the stern.


    Today I milled the parts for the inwales out of a very old salvaged kauri weatherboard and some recycled Oregon (D. fir) that have been following me around for years. Lots of noise; big mess. They are two layers of 1/2" x 1 1/2" (12 x 38mm), 15 ft + 8ft pieces, scarf joins staggered. I will glue them in tomorrow, and make patterns for the plywood panels.

    Well, that's it for 2017. It has been very pleasant to have friends from other places calling in over the holiday period.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  22. #302
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Happy New Year!

  23. #303
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Happy New Year Ian!

    /Fredrik

  24. #304
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks Thad, and Fredrik. Happy New Year to you too!
    Ian

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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Wishing you all the best in boat construction for the new year Ian

    Andrew

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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks Andrew. I hope you have a better year at yours too.
    Ian

  27. #307
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    347

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    "I will glue them in tomorrow, and make patterns for the plywood panels."

    Well, it took me all day on Saturday to make wallpaper patterns for the plywood panels for the bunk tops and cockpit,


    and on Sunday I glued the fourth side onto the mizzen mast housing.


    On Monday I shaped the strips for the inwales, by the standard method - shape and fit the ends, dry-assemble and mark the scarfs to match. These are my primitive scarfing jigs, one for 1/2" (12 mm.) and one for 3/4" (20 mm.).


    On Tuesday I glued in the first layer. Here are the strips laid out, ready for gluing. They are recycled kauri and Oregon (D. fir). The screws in the hull are the same 1" (25 mm.) button-headed screws that I used for the planking. I also used 12 C-clamps along each side. I had to have several rehearsals before I put the glue on, for handling the pieces into position.


    On Wednesday I glued in the second layer. Ah, that looks much better. These screws are 32mm. (1 1/4"). They are just to stop the inwale pieces from slipping sideways. (I am still playing around with camera settings. This must be the one that brings out the yellow.)


    Today (Thursday) I took the screws out and cleaned up the inwales with a plane and 40g. sandpaper, and did some more filling and filleting. I will
    fill the screw-holes by poking meat-skewers into them and breaking them off.

    The Kotik plans suggest putting the inwales in as part of the building frame construction, by screwing them to the moulds, gluing and screwing them to the stems, and gluing the sheerplanks onto them. This would have been quicker, but would have made it more difficult to take the moulds out and put the bulkheads in. Take your pick of which method to use.

    The next job is to complete the bunk framing.

    We will have a young relation of mine with us for the next two weeks of his school holidays. I hope to teach him some woodwork.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  28. #308
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Everett, WA, USA
    Posts
    446

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    She's really taking shape. Nice to see. Keep up the good work.

    Travis.

  29. #309
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    633

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post



    The Kotik plans suggest putting the inwales in as part of the building frame construction, by screwing them to the moulds, gluing and screwing them to the stems, and gluing the sheerplanks onto them. This would have been quicker, but would have made it more difficult to take the moulds out and put the bulkheads in. Take your pick of which method to use.


    Cheers,
    Ian
    Very good to see progress! I made the same decision for the inwales of #106. The epoxy manual by Gougeon Brothers suggest that the stringers and inwales could be lamined using the outside of the hull as a mold. After curing, they suggest that the stringer/inwale is cleaned up on the bench before final fitting on the inside of the hull.

    /Fredrik

  30. #310
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    347

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Travis. I've had a fairly good run at it this week but she'll be a bit slow for the next couple of weeks.

    Thanks, Fredrik. I have the Gougeon book, but their method sounds a bit tricky to me. I think I like the way I did it well enough. It's good to know several methods though.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  31. #311
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    633

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Thanks, Travis. I've had a fairly good run at it this week but she'll be a bit slow for the next couple of weeks.

    Thanks, Fredrik. I have the Gougeon book, but their method sounds a bit tricky to me. I think I like the way I did it well enough. It's good to know several methods though.

    Ian

    Ok, thanks Ian, I will probably do it as you did as well. Seems like a lot of work to mask the outside of the hull.

  32. #312
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Kilmelford
    Posts
    75

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Interesting to see different methods once again. I glued the inwhales inside before taking the hull off the mounds, as I was worried the structure would lose shape otherwise. It was quite tricky to do and impossible to get a neat job, when I couldn’t see what was going on inside. It’s given me a lot of extra work sorting it. Also of course I had to cut the mounds to free the hull, ok as I’m only doing one hull.
    Ewan G Kennedy

  33. #313
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    347

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ewan, I did the inwales on my Eun na Mara Islesburgh the same way as on my Kotik. The EM design has laminated frames forward and aft of the mast, but none amidships. The sheerplanks sprang out a little when I released them from the moulds so I put a brace across the sheer amidships to bring them back to the correct measurement before I put the bulkheads in. This only brought them back at the sheerline but did not affect the next planks down, so she ended up with a slight tumblehome amidships, which was not noticeable to anybody else but slightly annoying to me. I should have let the sheer follow its own line, even if she had ended up slightly wider than designed. Hence my quote from A. Vaitses below. My Kotik has four pairs of laminated frames (extra to the plans), so the planks did not move when released from the moulds.
    'Scuse me for mentioning it, but as Iain O says, there are blue whales and sperm whales, but no inwhales.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  34. #314
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    332

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Looking very good Ian.
    Enjoying your progress.
    PeterW

  35. #315
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    347

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks Peter. Your Whilly Tern is very pretty.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

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