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Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #771
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    That's very interesting, Steve, and your helmsman looks very relaxed.

    My motor arrangement was inspired by yours, with a sliding hatch, and the throttle handle turning up vertically behind the front, so thanks for that. Islesburgh's motor sat a little further forward, so the handle came up in front of the bulkhead, which was alright too, really. The hatch could be unlatched and lifted off. We always have Kotik's throttle-handle turned up out of the way when we are operating. It sits just in front of the mizzen mast, where I can use it quite easily. Bringing it forward for motoring would be the exception, but I will have made a laminated tiller before we take her out again, so I will be able to keep her straight with that, and lash it more easily.

    To wedge the motor I just used bits of firm foam, but it wasn't much use. I think you said your motor was the 2004 model, which is the same as Islesburgh's. Our new one is the current model "Evinrude-Tohatsu", which is really a Tohatsu but supplied by Evinrude. It has the same adjustment as the other one, which controls the amount of steering friction but doesn't lock the motor in a fixed position. Like yours, my motor well is fairly narrow and the motor is not used for steering.

    Yes, I agree that the steering gets harder as you motor faster.

    You have probably noticed the VHF aerial in front of the mizzen mast. When we're sailing I fold it back flat along the deck, and it still works like that, but it has a better range if I stand it up, as is to be expected. I also have a hand-held VHF radio.

    Islesburgh's bilge boards are as designed. We only got sand up one once, but we got sand up the slot of the rudder plate any number of times. I found that I could loosen the bolt in the back corner of the rudder body and pull the sides apart by hand, enough for the sand to fall out. Getting at it to do that was sometimes the hard part, but the rudder still worked quite well without the plate down, so I didn't always have to fix it straight away.

    My mainmast rigging seems pretty right now. The only things I might still do are to replace the main halyard (the red one) with a thicker white one spliced like the jib halyard, and maybe glue a thin wooden facing onto the outside of the block. The shrouds /stays are spliced and looped around the top of the mast above the band according to Tom Cunliffe's book "Hand, Reef and Steer". I did that because there was a lot of stuff to put on the one mast-band. (There are plenty of videos about splicing single and double braid rope.) The lines all seem to be free of each other now.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 04-09-2020 at 05:38 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  2. #772
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I've got Kotik slung up about 150mm (6") clear of the trailer now, ready for a bit of TLC along the keel and centreboard. Here are a few pics. The weight is shared between the slings and blocks under the bilge runners. I would take the trailer out but I can't get the back wheels off the trailer because one of the studs turns with the nut (which also made it more difficult to get the trailer into the workshop), and the workshop floor has piles of gear on it. I'll get the stud welded when I can. Its a minor inconvenience just now. I later found that the 100x100mm (4x4") post at the bow was not necessary, so I took it out, with no creaks and groans from above. I used to sling Islesburgh up this way, without either post. The red strapping (and the red main halyard) used to be parts of our son Andrew's climbing gear.











    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  3. #773
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Working at a leisurely pace, I have finished touching up the centreboard and varnishing the dinghy oars. I put Kotik back down onto the trailer today.
    I have also been playing around with the idea of making a laminated tiller. Islesburgh's tiller had an 11" (275mm) loop on each side, which we found a bit restrictive in tight places, so I thought of making this one with a 15" loop, and on one side only, but the Kotik design has a longer stern with the mizzen mast further in from the end, so my drawing ended up with a 25" loop, which looks a bit excessive, in my opinion. This allows a 35 degree action and for the way the rudder head swings sideways because of the curve in it. I haven't got enough epoxy to make it yet anyway, so I'll do some more cogitating.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  4. #774
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Today I made a mock-up tiller by laying out sticks over the pattern I drew yesterday, to check the amount of loop required for 35 degrees of movement. This model allows the tiller handle to reach as far out as the gunwale on the port side. I saw that it would obstruct the throttle handle and the cam-cleat for the mizzen sheet.


    So then I rearranged the curves with an electrical extension cord, redrew the pattern, and screwed some blocks of wood to the drawing to clamp the laminations onto. The tin (can) represents the mast, which is offset 2" (50mm) to port.


    Tomorrow I will thickness and steam the strips and put them in the jig to cool. If that works, I will just leave them in the jig until I can get more epoxy.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  5. #775
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    That would be a heroic lamination, can’t wait to see the end product

  6. #776
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Straightening and dressing the rough-sawn strips took most of yesterday, and the steaming and placing of them took most of today, along with the prep.work. Here's the result, so far. There are nine strips, 44mm wide x 4.5mm thick, which is as thin as my thicknesser would go. The mock-up looks a bit droopy but the laminations add up to being 44mm square. Maybe eight strips would be enough. The whole thing should support itself well enough. I'll have to wait until I can get some more glue before I do any more. I might just treat this as a trial run and buy some kwila (merbau) to make it out of, when I can.


    Here are photos of the tiller of my Eun na Mara Islesburgh, made of American ash in 3mm laminations, seven each side. I didn't have to steam them.



    You can see that the stern of the Eun na Mara is shorter than the Kotik's, and the mizzen socket is at the back of the motor well, not beside it.

    And here is the tiller on my friend Richard Almond's Eun na Mara Skerry. See alsohttps://www.geoss.com.au/eun_mara/index.htm


    Enough for now.

    Ian


    Attached Images Attached Images
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #777
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Looking good Ian.
    if you want thinner strips out of your thicknesser, you can make a platen for the lower table and then you’ll be able to go thinner. Also when you feed strips in, hold up the back end of strip so it forces beginning of strip down against platen. Do a trial first to see how thin you can go cos some thicknessers shatter the wood if it’s real thin. Should be able to get 3mm.
    good luck

    see if your boat shop can post/courier the epoxy, I wanna see it done.
    Last edited by Andrew Donald; 04-24-2020 at 12:36 AM.

  8. #778
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Andrew. That's a good suggestion. I'll keep it in mind. My old thicknesser went down to 3mm, but this one won't. I thought the strips were thin enough anyway, and they bent around the blocks alright although there was still plenty of spring in them. I steamed each one for about 15 minutes, one at a time. Perhaps a bit longer would have helped, but so far, so good. The timber is that recycled kauri we were trimming the boat with. It is very dry.

    NZ steps down from lockdown level 4 to level 3 next Tuesday. We oldies will still be staying at home, but the shops will be able to operate on-line if they can operate safely and contact-less, not just for "essential" items only, so I should be able to get some epoxy delivered, and a few other bits I want for the boat. I wouldn't do that for timber though. I would rather select my pieces.

    Of my Eun na Mara and the four I know in Australia, mine is the only one with the tiller going around both sides of the mizzen. Two of them had a curved tiller going around one side, and the other two had the option provided in the plans for an under-stern rudder with the rudder post forward of the mizzen and a short conventional tiller. You can see them on the various parts of Richard Almond's website: https://www.geoss.com.au/eun_mara/ . Four others I know have the over-stern rudder with a push-pull linkage under the after-deck from a short tiller forward of the mizzen. You can see this on http://www.alistego.com/Alistego.com...steering-gear/ There are a number of threads on the subject in this forum. The mizzen does make the stern rather "busy", but I like having it when we're out there.

    I haven't entirely given up on the Norwegian tiller. I will see which one I like better.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 04-24-2020 at 05:23 AM. Reason: sp.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  9. #779
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I am starting a quick thread, "Feather Pram for Kotik". It will be a short thread for a short boat. See http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...t=Feather+Pram

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 05-07-2020 at 03:51 PM. Reason: link
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  10. #780
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Ha ha.....I started one of those about 25 years ago hoping to finish it while my kids were little but they are 25 and 29 now, but the boat is about 2/3 done. I like to take my time. I’m betting yours is done before mine.
    are you going to do the sailing rig Ian or just a tender?
    cant get building out of your veins can you, how many boats is that in the last decade?

    Some thoughts about building for you Ian.
    - my hull is done in 4mm but it worries me a bit, wishing I’d gone for 6mm. Both for stiffness of individual planks and puncture resistance when beaching, although maybe glass inside and out could help with that?
    - have a think about doing floors straight( both athwartships and for/aft) it’ll make things a lot easier with the sole.
    - if you go with the 4mm, as I did, then perhaps one or two light frames to stiffen things up a bit, the 4mm is pretty light. The gunnels and thwarts help but the 4 is light.
    - just to add, maybe an extra floor spaced accordingly if you go with 4mm.
    - if 4mm then like you said somewhere, just go without fairing laps but fill the laps with goo. Should make for good stiffening stringers.
    - re point above, I think like Iain’s plans do, he has put in plank lines on each station, so may take some thinking to just overlap them??
    - dunno if this boat is designed for two people but the above may help for that, or my bulk!!
    Last edited by Andrew Donald; 05-06-2020 at 06:33 PM.

  11. #781
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Andrew. Yes, I saw on Steve "Stromborg's" Eun Mara thread that you were building one, slowly.
    I will make the sailing version. Alison can make the sail. It might be fun to sail it on my own, but we won't be sailing it two-up. This will be the fourth boat since I retired. I'm pretty lucky really.
    Thanks for the good advice. Yes, I am using the 4mm ply I was going to use for a third kayak in 1982, but only built two. They were plywood versions of that yellow one. I am thinking of 'glassing it, or doubling the bottom, or both. I will just lap the planks without bevelling them, as Iain shows. Yes, the floors are straight on top.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  12. #782
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I got the new tiller glued up yesterday evening. It took about four hours all up, and about 700 ml of WEST 105 resin, plus hardener 205 and fillers. I made brown glue by using half glue powder and half wood dust off my belt sander (out of that yellow bucket, Andrew). We are having sunny days and frosty nights this week, so the cool temperature kept the glue workable until I had glued all the strips and could bend them back into the blocks. I have left the clamps on today and will take them off tomorrow (after 36 hours). Of course the laminations sprang out a bit when I took them out of the blocks, even after about six weeks since I steamed them, but that was expected. You can see in the background how I glued them. I glued the inside face of each one lying flat on the bench, then I stood the next one up over the box so it wouldn't fall over, and glued the outside face of it, shifted the box away, then pushed the glued strip into the previous one on the bench, glued the inside face, etc., etc. When I had put the whole assembly back into the blocks I didn't scrape all the squeeze-out off, I just spread it flat over the top side. It looks just like chocolate icing. I will plane it off with my electric planer.


    I hope you are all keeping safe and well.

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 06-02-2020 at 02:58 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  13. #783
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    The Feather Pram has taken a back seat this week while I have got on with those jobs on Kotik that we listed during our summer away.

    1. Finishing the new tiller. It's the loopiest loopy tiller you ever saw! It feels good in the hand though. The loop has to come quite well forward because the mast is fairly close to the cockpit. I have glued another wedge-shaped piece on here since the photo was taken, to increase the depth at the end, to almost the same depth as where the middle cable-tie is. The hole in the rudder-head is taller at the back than at the the front, to allow some upward tilting of the handle end for stand-up steering.


    It fits like this, with the third layer showing underneath at the end. I'll put a small wedge through the end, behind the rudder.


    The weight of the tiller pulls it over to the starboard side when at rest, naturally. It will be out the way there, when we are installing the mizzen mast, and I will have a piece of shock cord to keep it centred when in use. It doesn't restrict the steering at all. (This tiller is not in the Wee Seal/Kotik plans. It is inspired by the Eun na Mara tiller.)


    2. I put a bigger (6") inspection hatch in the aft sub-deck, so now I can see right to the bottom of it. The smaller one is redundant now, but can still be used for ventilation.


    And a 4" hatch in the bottom of the cockpit locker on the other side. (The local chandlery only had black ones this time.)


    This fits nicely into the part of the bulkhead below the piece of oak bed-end which supports the motor.


    Well, that's my six photos for this posting, so..... to be continued.
    Last edited by IanMilne; 08-06-2020 at 06:33 AM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  14. #784
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    The third job was to put a skin-fitting or something in the centrecase cap, to enable a stick to be poked down it to push the board down if there is sand up the slot. (This isn't supposed to happen, as the slot is in the garboard, but as we have seen, it happened anyway. In this case I have used a fuel filler cap, as it is fairly low and we have to be able to sit on it. It is also big enough to fit a broom handle-sized stick. I also put pieces of kwila on the inside of the cap to keep the lanyard centred. They allow the board to come right up but needed a bit more cut out to clear the roller. (Right is aft.) The black is the Pettit's antifouling I was originally going to use on the hull, but just used it inside the c/case.


    Interior view. The filler-cap is just forward of the roller. Ideally, it would be further aft, but then the lanyard would be in the way.


    After a bit of experimenting, to seal the cap down this time I have used a sealant called "Parfix All Purpose Highly Flexible Silicone Sealant". It stays soft. I would say it is translucent, rather than clear, but that's OK. We'll see how it goes.


    The trailer has also been getting a bit of TLC.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  15. #785
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I recently added garboard drains to Marianita's bilgeboard caps for the same reason. At one point a chunk of kelp wrapped itself around the pennant and wedged the board in the case, removing the whole cap to clear it was a lot of work.

    The new tiller is pretty sweet looking.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  16. #786
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Steve. I had made Islesburgh's case lids in two pieces, which might have made it easier to remove them, and used some kind of silicone sealant which was supposedly capable of being taken apart, but I never had to do that, with Islesburgh. The stuff I had used on Kotik's lid was the same story, but it was a lot of work too, during our trip. I hope this sealant is better, but I have improved the beaching legs too, so the situation may not arise.

    Building 'Islesburgh' (7).jpg

    Glad you like the tiller.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 08-06-2020 at 04:11 PM. Reason: sp.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  17. #787
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Good to have something to do Ian. I don’t spose boats are ever finished are they? I’m glad your tiller has worked out. How do you stop it coming out of rudder head? Something I’ve been thinking about for a while. You’ve got me upping the size of the c’board stick pokey opening now that I’ve seen yours, I only had a 10mm one before!

  18. #788
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Andrew. I hope you can keep working in your new lockdown situation. Yes, if you build or own a boat, you've always got something to do.
    My tiller will have a wedge through the back end of it behind the rudder, with a loop of thin shock cord to hold it in. See the pics of my EM tiller and Richard's, on #776.
    You would need a piece of reinforcing steel to poke through a 10mm hole. It might scratch the board!
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 08-07-2020 at 04:24 AM. Reason: Add line 3
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  19. #789
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    New lockdown only means we have to wear masks if we go into town. Thankfully we’re not in Melbourne. Been up here since March. How’s things in NZ . Still virus free?Say hi to Alison for me.

  20. #790
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I've been using a product called "Dolfinite"

    "Natural" is the color, a sort of tan. Dolfinite also comes in white. It has proven to be quite tenacious after setting for a few days but with some careful work using a thin putty knife I've safely removed anything it has been used to seal. I did try using the much vaunted butyl tape but it leaked like a sieve on my bilgeboard case caps.
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  21. #791
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Andrew. In NZ we are in "Alert level 1". We are still free of community transmission of covid19 but we have strict border control with 14 days quarantine for anyone allowed in, with testing done on the third and twelfth days, and managed isolation for anyone testing positive. The Govt. is asking us to stock up on masks in case there is a second wave of infection and we might have to go back up the Alert scale. We can still do "normal" activities, but there are a few precautions we are asked to take.

    Thanks for that pointer, Steve. I have never seen Dolfinite on the shelves here but a NZ on-line site advertises it at $278NZ for a tin of it, which converts to $183.72US. They state a delivery time of two weeks, so they must import it to order. It doesn't say the quantity but the illustration is the same as yours. West Marine, Seattle has it at $69.99 (US) / quart, and Jamestown Distributors has the same at $52.98. The freight must be the expensive part! It looks like good stuff, but I'll let it go, thanks.

    Here's another pic of the tiller for Kotik with the extra piece glued on. I've since coated the whole thing with clear-finish epoxy but not sanded it yet, so it looks pretty good so far. I have also whipped a few ropes' ends that needed it, on the gunter-yard that you can see in the photo, and other places.


    That's all on Kotik just now.

    Keep safe!
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 08-11-2020 at 03:28 PM. Reason: Change "lockdowm" to "Alert".
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  22. #792
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    It's in the news today that there are four positive cases in Auckland. They are all in the same household but nobody knows how they got it. So Auckland goes into Alert level 3 and the rest of the country into level 2, from midday today. (Alert level 4 is complete lockdown except for essential services.)
    Ian

  23. #793
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I never have seen dolfinite on the shelves around here. Seems it is mostly sold in the US.
    One thing about silicone. It can be some nuisance when revarnishing by causing fisheyes.
    The tiller comes out nicely Ian.
    Have fun building.
    Max

  24. #794
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Max. I sealed the c/case lids with a silicone sealant on Islesburgh too. Then I gave the area a good scrub with turps (mineral turpentine), and never had any trouble with the varnish.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  25. #795
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    724

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    My boatbuilding has been very slow lately, as we have been helping convert part of an old hotel building into a community sewing studio that our daughter Fiona (Jenkin) runs. They have moved there from a smaller place. See http://www.stitchkitchen.nz/about.html. That's our Fiona on the right of the picture. They had their official opening the other night, so the pressure is off us now.

    We have bought our ticket for this year's virtual Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival. Should be good! We have been to five of the real shows in the last ten years, mostly camping at the local showgrounds. I have learned a lot there.
    Anyway, I have done some more varnishing, or "Cetolling", so here's the new Kotik tiller with 3 coats of Cetol MarineTeak over sanded epoxy. It will get a Turk's Head knot on the handle in due course.



    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  26. #796
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    364

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Lovely!
    You can never have too many clamps

  27. #797
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
    Posts
    78

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hello Ian,
    Lovely work you are doing and have done.
    Just discovered your thread after posting one on mine.
    I will take the time to read your posts more thoroughly.
    Isn't laminating fun...there's something satisfying about making straight timber bend to the shape you want.
    Cheers,
    Mike.

  28. #798
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    724

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks very much, Mike. I've been reading your thread too. Nice boat. Great work. Good to have another Kiwi on the forum.
    My wife was brought up in Napier, and we lived in Rotorua in the 1960s-70s. Explored the lakes quite well, by kayak, including Lake Waikaremoana.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  29. #799
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    724

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    We had a tow-bar put on the front of the tow-truck, to make it easier to push the boat into its berth at the "private jetty" or up the ramp to the workshop. The tongue and ball are removable. We only use them at home. The ball is quite low so we have to use the jack to lower the trailer coupling onto it. That's alright.


    Here's that loopy tiller again. The thin cord is just a temporary lashing but I will be able to use a better one in the same place to lash the tiller in required positions. The loop of black shock-cord keeps the tiller centred against its own weight. Having the tiller curved to only one side means it doesn't get in the way when I am standing on the deck inserting the mizzen mast into its socket.


    and the wedge keeps it in.




    We took the sails out of their bags, bent the mizzen onto its boom, and hauled it up. Yep, that went OK.


    During the winter I thought of using a carabiner instead of a block, to allow the yard to come up more vertically, so I tied loops of dyneema into the halyard attachment points which are on the back of the yard. Now, to reef the sail, I can lower it right down and quickly shift the carabiner to the required position. It seems to work. (Our son Andy gave us the rope and the carabiner, from his climbing gear.)


    Yep, that went OK too. (The battens aren't in.)


    Then we took the sails and attached spars off before it rained, and put them in their travelling bags which get lashed to the trailer. We didn't rig the jib this time, but when we do I will be using two snap-shackles instead of four blocks, so now I have a bagful of redundant blocks!

    We had planned to go to the Opening Day of the season with the Southland Trailer Yacht Squadron at Riverton on the south coast this weekend, but it was cancelled because of the equinoctial westerly gales we have been having for the last week, doing some damage in various places. Today was calm here so I went to a working bee at the local clubhouse instead.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 09-19-2020 at 08:30 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  30. #800
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Napier, Hawkes Bay NZ
    Posts
    78

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    That's a very cool looking boat you have there Ian.Lovely proportions.

  31. #801
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Rushworth, Australia
    Posts
    560

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I’m glad you have the tiller ready for the upcoming season Ian, although I must say that’s a lot of trouble to go to just to clear your legs !

    Thanks for the closeup of the peg used to fasten it too.

    What does Alison get up too now she’s finished her books?

  32. #802
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    3,463

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!


    Very nice and tidy stowage of the fuel tank you came up with. I'd like to find a right angle fuel line fitting for mine, never been happy with the way the hose comes off the engine, managed to knock mine off once, took a few minutes to figure out why the thing died and wouldn't start.

    Sweet sweep on the tiller too, amazing how large to loop has to be isn't it?
    Steve

    If you would have a good boat, be a good guy when you build her - honest, careful, patient, strong.
    H.A. Calahan

  33. #803
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    724

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Mike, Yes, I like the proportions of it (3:1) better than the Wee Seal's. (It's a stretched Wee Seal.) I've just been catching up on your thread too. Amazing work!

    Hi Andrew. It will be interesting to try out the new tiller. Clearing our legs was not the problem with the Norwegian tiller. We'll take them both and see which one we like better. The wedge in the back of the tiller was in the the Eun Mara design but not the Wee Seal. I've trimmed the shock-cord better now.
    Alison is always busy, one way and another, and she will come sailing with me now.

    Hi Steve, There are two 12 litre tanks in the port cockpit locker. They just fit through the lid. Yes, a right-angle fitting on the hose would be good.
    Compared with the Eun na Mara, the after deck is longer and the mizzen mast further forward, so the tiller has to have quite a wide sweep in it. The handle end goes a little beyond the gunwale.

    Thanks for the input.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  34. #804
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    724

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I keep forgetting to tell you the weight of Kotik. We weighed her on the trailer, on the local weighbridge, last January, on our way out for a trip to Lake Manapouri. I parked the Pajero just off the end of the platform with the trailer still connected, and the weight was 1830 kg. Then I put the jockey wheel down and unhitched the trailer from the tow-bar, and the weight was 1970 kg. The Tare Mass of the trailer, according to its label, is 440 kg. So, the weight of the boat, with all gear and food for a couple of weeks, was 1530 kg. We only buy the petrol for the outboard motor at the last opportunity, which would add about 20 kg. The Pajero has a towing rating of 2800 kg. (Conversion factor is 2.2.)

    Having fibreglassed the planking on both sides, Kotik is probably heavier than Iain Oughtred had in mind, but I don't mind that. The specs give the weight as 820 kg and the displacement as 1180 kg. I discussed these figures once with Iain, in relation to Islesburgh, and he said the weight figure refers to the bare hull, and the displacement figure is the designer's best guess as to where the waterline will be. When we launched Islesburgh, she floated right on her marks. I painted the waterline higher later. I painted the waterline higher on Kotik too.

    Comparing speeds in comparable situations, without being very scientific about it, we think Kotik is about a knot faster than Islesburgh.

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 09-20-2020 at 04:23 AM. Reason: Conversion factor.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  35. #805
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    724

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I had been thinking, not very seriously, that it might be possible to carry the Feather Pram on the roof of Kotik at times, so as it was a sunny afternoon and Kotik was easily accessible, we tried putting it up there, in three positions.

    1. On the roof.
    P1010489.jpg

    2. Across the roof.
    P1010499.jpg

    3.Across the foredeck.
    P1010504.jpg

    They all had their problems and the dinghy would always be in the way of something, including restricting the use of one sail or another, and would also be difficult to carry when towing the boat on the road, except maybe on a roofrack on the Pajero, which is a bit high for us oldies, so we decided the idea was impracticable and we will stick to using our inflatable dinghy when we take Kotik on a trip. Still, the Feather Pram will make a nice toy to take down to the harbour on our common-garden trailer.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

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