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Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #421
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Northern Europe
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    9,451

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Nice work Ian, keep going!

  2. #422
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    411

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Oh, I wasn't paying attention. Sjogin IIIa it is. I see you're already well on the way. I'll be watching. Thanks, Steve.
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 11-08-2018 at 05:11 AM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  3. #423
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    411

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Ian.
    I'll be making the deck patterns next.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  4. #424
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    411

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I have made all the patterns for the deck, by spreading wallpaper over the framing to correspond with the layout in the rough scale drawing above, and marking through. Today I made the patterns for the cabin sides and cockpit coamings by building mock-ups of them with pieces of my well-used 3mm MDF, which have already served as planking patterns for the Sooty Tern and spiling battens for the Kotik, and hot-melt glue. Very useful, that.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  5. #425
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Kilmelford
    Posts
    79

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian

    It's great to see your progress, with a lot more care than I've been taking. I've been getting on, as you'll see from the annexed images. I've a couple of comments for your interest.

    After a great deal of thought I've got rid of the outboard well altogether, which took longer than building it in the first place. I was always unhappy about having petrol engine in the boat, let alone having it staring in my face, but apart from the safety aspect the reasoning was as follows.

    I happen to own a Mercury 3hp two stroke, which I bought brand new around 2000 intending to use it on Stroma, but never used. It's a nice light unit that I can lift easily and the well was built for it. From discussions with friends who've tried running these things in wells I convinced myself that they don't really work well, as the engine tends to suffocate. I decided not to risk that and considered a four stroke, but apart from the cost they're extremely heavy and bulky and storage would be a problem.

    This led me to consider an electric unit, of which there are now some extremely good examples around. This seems to be the way to go, but they have a very slow running propellor of about twelve inches diameter, which is far too big for a well. They are very light and the battery being detachable makes hanging on a bracket over the side very easy.

    I haven't made a final decision. If the boat turns out fine I may instal an electric power pod under the hull alongside the ballast keel. Some thought needed, as they're about 5000 Euros.

    I may just end up sailing about without an engine, as I did with Stroma for many years. You get to find some lovely new anchorages when the wind drops.

    I'm also having thoughts about the rudder as drawn by Iain. He's got the widest part near the surface, where it does least good, and rudders hung on this type of sloped stern are always bound to be inefficient. Mikhail Markov, who as you know has the prototype White Fang, found the boat hard to steer and has redesigned his rudder to increase the area. I'm struggling with the options here, which are either increase the area down below, which produces an enormous rudder, or add a hinged section that can swing down vertically, as Paul Gartside has done with his Sjogin III design, as far as I can see. A bad idea is a fixed section below the line of the keel, especially if like me you have an acquaintance with reefs and skerries.

    Finally I've added a photo of Iain with his future apprentice inspecting progress earlier this year.

    Best wishes from Scotland!

    Ewan

    IMG_4535 (2).jpgIMG_4514.jpgIMG_4588.jpgIMG_3710 (1).jpg
    Ewan G Kennedy

  6. #426
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    411

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ewan,

    Thanks for the photos and comments. Nice to have a photo of Iain on my thread. Your Kotik looks as if it's coming on pretty well too. (http://scottishboating.blogspot.com/)

    We were quite happy with our outboard motor in the well of our Eun na Mara Islesburgh. It seemed to run a bit roughly the first time out, in the well with the lid on, but after I made ventilation holes in the back of the lid it ran very well, including a couple of occasions when we would have been in big trouble if it had stopped.

    Our new motor is essentially the same motor as Islesburgh's - a 6 hp 4stroke Tohatsu. For bulk, I built the well to fit the motor. For weight, yes, at 27kg it was as heavy as I wanted to lift, and that not any more often than I had to. For storage, we just left it in the well, except when I took it out for servicing. OK, it probably caused a bit of drag when we were sailing, but we tolerated that. I manhandled it as little as possible. You can see it on my part of Richard Almond's website: http://www.geoss.com.au/eun_mara/index.htm. On Richard's own part of the website, you will see his electric pod motor.

    I will leave the rudder as designed. I like the hook on the back, and the rounded shape probably won't hit the ground on part of our driveway. The EM's rudder had a retractable plate in it. Ours worked OK but was a complicated thing to make, and heavy.

    Here are a couple of pics of a small Zulu we saw at the Scottish Traditional Boat Festival at Portsoy in 2015.





    Thanks again for your comments.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 11-12-2018 at 02:19 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #427
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Europe
    Posts
    9,451

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    ^ Took me a moment to see the big hole for the outboard! I dont think there should be any issues with drawing out the length of the bottom of the rudder, kind of normal a shallow draft. My Folkboat rudder was very slim at the bottom, but more than 4ft of it was submerged. I had not read that Mikhail had issues, and he never mentioned it when we had contact, but good to know of any issue, maintaining steerage is pretty important!

  8. #428
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    411

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for that, Ian. When we were on Kotik Pura Vida in June last year she steered alright. However, I haven't made my rudder yet so I could easily fill it out a bit without being too obvious about it. There is a plan of a 42' Zulu here, showing the rudder, on Lupussonic's thread: http://lupussonic.com/FTP/Original%2...20-%20Copy.JPG

    I've got all the deck parts clamped in place now, ready to drill the screw holes.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

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