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Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #386
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Max and Ian.
    Yes, I only use single-pot paint and varnish, brushed on. See https://altexcoatings.co.nz/frontend...s.cfm?page=sds. AY&B section. I can buy these easily, locally. The products I am using (all over epoxy so far) are:
    Hull bottom: 2 coats grey Multi-purpose Primer, 3 coats Altex No. 5 antifouling;
    Hull topsides: 1 coat grey " " " , 1 coat white Surfacer-undercoat, 2 coats Altex Regatta enamel (alkyd base) "Snow White";
    Interior, paint: As for hull topsides. The sole panel colour is "Arctic Grey", which the decks will be also.
    Interior, varnish: 4 coats Altex Timbercote, gloss, thinned 25%. This is also a good exterior varnish, but I haven't quite decided what to use on the outside yet. I will probably epoxy-seal the plywood cabin front and sides, in which case I will probably go on using the Altex varnish (7 coats), but probably not the masts and spars. I see Sikkens Marine Teak recommended here. (Thanks, David G. I met you last year.)
    I was intending to paint the sheerstrake a different colour, but maybe not now. The sails will be cream. We don't want too many colours.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  2. #387
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    We came home from Port Townsend and other places last Tuesday. It was great to be there and meet some more of you. (See PTWBF 2018 thread.)
    For the next two days I pushed myself to get the rest of the varnishing done in the main cabin of the Kotik, four coats at 12 hour intervals, which is the "hot-coating" technique I learned at Port Townsend. No sanding between coats, except very lightly before the last one. Here are some more photos, just to complete the picture. I will have to sand some of it off later to glue more parts and trim pieces on. Now I can get on with the deck framing.

    The various loose panels. (They will need turnbuttons or some such later.)


    Port side.

    Starboard side


    Port side , put together.


    Starboard side, put together, except for positioning the shelves to be done later.


    So there it is, up to date. Yesterday I milled an oddly shaped but big enough piece of oak left over from my attempt at making the deadwood, to make a strong deck beam forward of the cabin-house to support the tabernacle.

    Cheers, Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  3. #388
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hello Ian,

    I've finally got to page 12. I have been reading through this thread from the start very slowly - paying close attention all the way - since a lot of it has been highly relevant for my Sooty Tern. Not the least because of the stellar master-craftsmanship shown. Mastery is almost always accompanied by the semblance of apparent ease - well in evidence here!

    Awestruck is probably another good description.

    Reading through the thread, I have been interested in the noted similarities with the shape of the Sooty/Arctic Tern hulls. They are beautiful, graceful shapes. Your references to sailing ST Trondra​ have also been of great interest.

    It's a pity (for me) that I got the the thread so late, as there some further queries that I would have mad on stuff back near the beginning, but I am not going what would effectively be wrenching the thread off-topic, so I will continue to lurk in the background - unless I see something that is useful for me to comment on. And, not to be a dog in the manger about things, applaud where necessary, of course.

    I'm continuing to look on with enormous interest.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-16-2018 at 05:05 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  4. #389
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Good progress, Ian. It's tough to get back on the horse after a long vacation but you did just that. I, for one, am glad that you made the trip to PT. It was very nice to see you!

    Jeff

  5. #390
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Absolutely beautiful Ian!
    Good progress. I can΄t wait till I get to the painting n΄varnishing part of the build (Just kidding! I hate all the sanding and mask wearing)

  6. #391
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks Alex, Jeff and Max.
    Alex, Thanks for your comments. My postings don't show the amount of bumbling around I do, but I do less of that now than I used to. Any questions, feel free.
    Jeff, I enjoyed meeting you too, on your fine boat Emily Ruth at PT. I hope to again.
    Max, I didn't really do much sanding. I had sanded the epoxy smooth with my random orbital sander, then I just cleaned it before the first coat of varnish and did four coats at twelve hour intervals with just a light sanding before the last one. It took a bit of self-discipline but it worked well.
    Now for another posting...
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 10-18-2018 at 04:25 AM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #392
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Well, it's high time I did another posting. This will have to be a double edition.

    I got that varnishing done and then we had a lot of other things to catch up on, expected and unexpected, so the boatbuilding was a bit erratic for a while. However, this week I have been truly back on the horse, to borrow a phrase.

    Continuing with the deck framing, I filed a horizontal notch in the inwale at each deckbeam and trimmed the bevelled end of the beam shorter until the top edge of the beam lined up with the true sheerline, the outer top edge of the sheerplank. This lowered each beam about 1/4" (6mm). The joints are just bevelled notches with the beam ends trimmed to the same angles.


    Then I planed along the tops of the inwales until they faired in with the beams.


    Then I tried the carlins in place again.


    The forward hatch is shown on the Wee Seal sloop plan about 3" (75mm) forward of the cabin front. I'm having a tabernacle forward of the cabin, so I had to move the hatch forward. I drew it on the Kotik construction plan, then on my lofting, then played around with battens until I thought I had it right, to Iain's measurements. (The beam closest to the camera is oak. The rest are macrocarpa.)


    So I built it like that, but when I crawled up and down through it I decided it was a bit narrow, and too far forward. Two of the joints were a bit rough, too. Nothing a blob of epoxy couldn't fix, but I could do better.


    This is cutting the notches for the king-plank.


    I'll continue this in the morning.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  8. #393
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I know on Marianita the forward hatch, which looks huge from the outside magically shrinks when I am climbing out from the inside.

    The tabernacle sits on top of the cabin, right? What have you planned for reinforcement up there?
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  9. #394
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Ian, wonderful work!
    I like that deckframing...
    Cheers
    Sφnke

  10. #395
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Looking good Ian. You're making nice progress. Sorry I missed you at the PTWBF.
    Travis.

  11. #396
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Travis. Welcome back. Yes, there are a lot of people at the PTWBF to get lost among, aren't there. Glad Zuri is sailing well.

    Thanks, Sonke. Glad you like it!

    Hi Steve. Yes, I remember that Dale and some of us other Eun na Mara builders made the forward hatch a bit wider.
    Thanks for the question. In the first photo above, the nearest beam has those big knees under it, which is according to a sketch Iain sent me to show the construction of this area to avoid having a compression post under the mast, but the sketch was still done with the sloop rig in mind, which has the mast step on top of the cabin house. This beam is where the cabin front will be, which will be a double layer of 9mm ply. The back of the tabernacle for the yawl rig is attached to the cabin front, unlike EM. The front of it rests on that second beam, which I have made out of oak. It is quite heavy. If I had given it one more thought I would have put big knees under that beam as well. I might put a bit more reinforcing in the angles between that beam and the knees. I remember that the EM tabernacle is forward of the cabin, bolted through two heavy deck beams, also without a compression post. I also put in those laminated frames, which are extra to the plans. I think this arrangement will be OK. Perhaps I should run it past Iain now. (My Eun na Mara, and others, can be seen here: http://www.geoss.com.au/eun_mara/ .)

    Now for Kotik Deck Framing Part II.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  12. #397
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Kotik Deck Framing, Part II

    Having decided I didn't like the forward hatch frame, I spent the next day rebuilding it, a bit wider, a couple of inches further back, and with better joints. Here are the new side pieces, with better joints in the making!


    Here is the complete fore-deck framing with the new hatch parts, all screwed together. You can see some of the old notches. The next job is to take it all apart again and round off all the lower edges on my router table. There is still some fairing to do, and epoxy coating the parts, either before or after the big glue-up. The cabin front will be at the nearest beam and the tabernacle will sit on that one and the next one.


    Here's a close-up I took this morning of the structure around the Samson post. I was figuring out how to do it when my eye lit upon that off-cut of 6 x 1" (150 by 25mm) macrocarpa, which is just the thing. (There is a slight concavity in the kingplank profile at both ends of the boat.) I will shorten the post a bit and round the exposed corners. It will come out while I make the deck panels.


    Now, to the stern...
    The shape of the kingplank was a bit complicated but it was simple enough in the end.


    Here's some fancy joinery for you:


    And the last one. I have this plastic hatch for the after deck, but I will cunningly disguise it with a plywood lid to match the deck. I don't know how yet, but will see how it develops. I will cut out that part of the carlin after I have glued up the side deck framing, so the carlin will maintain its correct curve in the cockpit. The motor will need its own hatch too, of course.


    That stack of timber in the room behind the boat is some American birch I was given recently. Is birch used for boatbuilding?

    Now I'll go and do some work!

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  13. #398
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!



    I built a deck box that shores up the tabernacle a bit on Marianita but Kotik is framed up very much the same way. Something I think about whenever I see the forestay sagging, either when running or just bouncing around in the chop is adding a longitudinal member to each side of the hatch framing that would run from the the underside of the aft deck beam where the cabin starts to the forward beam supporting the hatch (filling in the gap between the two mast support beams). The theatrical scenery engineer in me thinks it would help to distribute the fore/aft torque of the mast across more deck beams.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  14. #399
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Only ever heard of Birch bark canoes. It only used as prime wood for burning around here, but then again, it does make good plywood sheets.

  15. #400
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for that well-timed suggestion, Steve. I don't want anything under the beams that might reduce the headroom, but I will put solid blocking between those two beams. The side members of the hatch frame are the same depth as the deckbeams so they will stop the oak beam from twisting, if it's likely to, and I will put solid oak blocking 1 3/4" thick (wide) on each side of the short piece of kingplank, which will be good for bolting the tabernacle onto, and another piece of blocking halfway between the CL and the carlin on each side. The cabin front at 18mm thick will form part of the structure. My fore-stay went slack on a run too, but I assumed it was just the mast bending or being pushed forward enough to slacken the stay.
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 10-19-2018 at 03:07 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  16. #401
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I love looking at structures, especially lattice-type ones, and yours is no exception, Ian!

    Beautifully done.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  17. #402
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    I don't want anything under the beams that might reduce the headroom, but I will put solid blocking between those two beams. (snip) My fore-stay went slack on a run too, but I assumed it was just the mast bending or being pushed forward enough to slacken the stay.
    Ian
    When I asked about the slack fore-stay the consensus seemed to be "They all do that" but it has bothered me, not enough to do anything about it yet, I'll probably do something about it this winter.

    For thickness, I envision something only an inch or so deep, just enough to tie everything (deck beams and longitudinal members) together across the bottom, the tops are captured by the plywood decking.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  18. #403
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    "They all do that" might be right, just like the leeward side-stays go slack when you're on the wind. Mine did anyway. We couldn't furl the jib wth the wind behind us, because the head of the shackle-pin ofthe top swivel caught the fore-stay, but that didn't bother us. Some people might not like it. I think one of our EM friends cut the head off the pin for that reason. You could always cut a screwdriver slot in it instead.
    Yesterday I put some blocks in between those two aft foredeck beams - a couple of oak ones to bolt the tabernacle to, and a couple further out. They will act like the blocking between the floor-joists of a house. I also started making a pattern for the front of the cabin. Pics later.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  19. #404
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    "Only ever heard of Birch bark canoes. It only used as prime wood for burning around here, but then again, it does make good plywood sheets." skaraborgcraft

    Thanks for that, Ian. Nobody gave me a sheet of birchbark though . (Beautiful canoes, aren't they.) I might use a couple of pieces of the birch for the cheeks of the rudder, which will be two layers of 18mm plywood.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  20. #405
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    OK. Here are some pics of the mast-bearing structure, so far. The cabin front is part of it.

    I arranged scraps of MDF along the after foredeck beam and glued them together with hot-melt glue. Then I shaped the pattern, using the parabolic arch technique.


    Then I clipped the pattern back on to the deckbeam and played around with my 4" EM deadlight pattern to find the right position for it.


    More of the same.


    The box is slightly wider than the tabernacle. I moved the deadlghts 20mm (3/4") outwards after this.


    Then I used the pattern to mark out the front panel on the offcut from my second-to-last sheet of plywood, and cut it out, allowing an extra 1/2" (12mm) for adjusting the height. I checked it for level, and alignment with the two bulkheads, and marked the line along the deck framing. (I'd better mark it 3/8" (9mm) higher for the thickness of the deck.)


    This shows how the deckbeam, the big knee and the cabin front all make up a big beam. The cabin front will be 2 layers of 9mm ply but I haven't made the second layer yet. I will have to buy four more sheets of marine ply, for the rest of the decking and the cabin roof.


    Tomorrow I will have the big glue-up, amd epoxy-coat all the parts as I go. It will be a messy day.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  21. #406
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Birchplywood was and is used for building ultralight airplanes. So it is very light but not so durable as gaboon or mahagonie. I talked to an man who builds big airplane models (about 4 meter span) and using birchplywood. But he says he has to protect it very good with paint otherwise it will warp if becoming wet...
    i wish a nice and quiet sunday to all...
    Sφnke

    P.S. Ian, you are making very good progress!
    it looks so good.

  22. #407
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hello Sonke, Thanks for that interesting info. about birch plywood. If I use any of this birch timber in the boat (I might not) it will be well protected. Thanks for watching.
    Regards,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  23. #408
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Well, today was a busy day! I started by pinning newspaper all around the inside of the hull to keep drips of epoxy off all that paint and varnish, and laying out all the deck parts in the order needed to put them in, (but I didn't get that quite right). Then I realised that to try to epoxy-coat each part as I glued it in was going to be too messy and take too long, so I just glued them all in today, and that was a full day's work.

    The parts before I started gluing:


    and here they are, all glued in.


    You can see how the sun comes into the front, south-facing, windows of the workshop in the evenings now.


    I will make the side-deck framing tomorrow, and give it all a bit of sanding, filling and filleting before I epoxy-coat it, and think about where I might want pads under the deck for mooring cleats and suchlike.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  24. #409
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    It’ll be a pity to see the deck go on . Not really, of course, and I’m enjoying this immensely .

    Interesting you mentioning the sun coming in through the south-facing window - I noticed the same thing here the other day. The year is flying by.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 10-22-2018 at 05:03 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  25. #410
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Alex.

    My plan to make the side decks today went out the window, but I have lined up the short sticks for the beams. I spent the rest of the day tracing the shapes of the plywood parts I still need off the plans, cutting them out and arranging them on pieces of paper representing sheets of plywood at the same scale. I have one sheet left from the 14 I bought originally, and found that I need to buy five more. It is the Wee Seal materials list that specifies 14 sheets, and the Kotik is 3ft (900mm) longer so it uses more plywood for the planking. I also used 9mm for the bunk tops instead of the 6mm as spec.
    So my plywood list now comes to:
    6mm, 1 sheet;
    9mm, 19 sheets;
    12mm, 3 sheets;
    18mm, 1 sheet (2 layers for the rudder).



    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 11-04-2018 at 04:05 AM. Reason: 3 sheets of 12mm plywood
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  26. #411
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Your work is really a great inspiration, very impressive!

    /Fredrik

  27. #412
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Fredrik. I'll be interested to see how you do yours, in due course. Different design, different designer, different builder - all good!

    I had another interrupted day today, but I got the carlins glued on later in the day. I didn't want to notch them for the beams until they were glued on, or they might have broken while I was handling them.

    Cheers, Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  28. #413
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Here's a gratuitous photo of my router-table, that I used to round off the lower edges of the deck framing. I don't have shares in the company.


    This pic shows the short side-deck framing pieces, pads for mooring cleats, and the carlin cutout for the after hatch. I installed the complete carlin and the deck framing before I cut out the carlin, so that the carlin would retain the correct curve in the cockpit area, which it did.


    This is the framing for the after hatch. I assembled these scrap pieces so that I could sight across them to make sure the frame would be all in the same plane.


    Dry assembly of the hatch frame. I had to make sub-assemblies for the longitudinal pieces and install them, then put the transverse pieces on top of them. The corner joints are halved.


    And here it is with the plastic hatch in place. The lid will open back against the mizzen mast. There will be a plywood lid over it to match the deck. The short pieces on the seat are the vertical struts for the coaming frame.


    This is the complete foredeck framing, with extra struts between the second and third deckbeams, pads for mooring cleats if I have them, and epoxy coating and filling done. The jib-sheets of EM Islesburgh used to catch in the forward mooring cleats if we let them go too slack, so this time we might just use the Samson post.


    Well, that's it, up to date. I didn't get anything done today, but tomorrow I will sand all the parts ready for painting, and make wallpaper patterns for the deck. I expect my five more sheets of 9mm ply to arrive any day. I am also thinking about the electrics....

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  29. #414
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    123

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Nice!

  30. #415
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Blue Hill, ME
    Posts
    976

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Nice progress, you're getting it done! Your thread is inspiring and intimidating. While I love looking at the quality of your work I only check in on occasion as it shows the amount of work and detail in building a boat that size. That will be very useful but I don't want to think too far ahead, right now it's one plank at a time.
    Steve B
    Sjogin IIIa
    PAYTON 13' Pea Pod

    RIVUS 16' Melonseed


    "If a man must be obsessed by something, I suppose a boat is as good as anything, perhaps a bit better than most." E. B. White

  31. #416
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    PNW, an island west of Seattle
    Posts
    1,777

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Still looking very nice, Ian. On that aft hatch... won't it be awkward to have to open both a ply and a plastic cover to gain access? Or am I missing something?

    Jeff

  32. #417
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Schleswig Holstein Germany
    Posts
    564

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Fantastic to see the deck framing grow together.
    Nice work Ian

  33. #418
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    411

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks Alex, Steve, Jeff and Max.
    Alex, good to have you on board.
    Steve, I checked your melonseed and peapod. Nice work! I see your peapod in the Launchings page of the new WB. I've subscribed to your Little Sjogin II thread.
    Jeff, Good question. I wondered about that too. We wanted to have the hatch lockable and the plastic hatch doesn't provide for that, so the lid will be lockable and also removable so we can put it in the boat somewhere when we are using the hatch.
    I only got the deck framing sanded today. The white paint down the sides will need a bit of touching up, later.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  34. #419
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    411

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I have just made an addition to the end of posting 89 on page 3 of this thread, about the spacing of keel bolts in a casting, if the bolts are cast in, to allow for contraction on cooling.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  35. #420
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Blue Hill, ME
    Posts
    976

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    >Steve, I checked your melonseed and peapod. Nice work! I see your peapod in the Launchings page of the new WB. I've subscribed to your Little Sjogin II thread. <<

    Thanks Ian, my Sjogin II isn't going to happen, little or big. Change of plans, Sjogin IIIa is my next project and since it's similar to Kotik your thread will be very helpful.
    Steve B
    Sjogin IIIa
    PAYTON 13' Pea Pod

    RIVUS 16' Melonseed


    "If a man must be obsessed by something, I suppose a boat is as good as anything, perhaps a bit better than most." E. B. White

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