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Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #456
    Join Date
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    Blue Hill, ME
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    994

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    More good progress. But I can't help noticing that your shop floor is spotless. C'mon! I will never be able to post a picture of my build after seeing that. The fact that mine is dirt is my excuse.
    Steve B
    Sjogin IIIa
    PAYTON 13' Pea Pod

    RIVUS 16' Melonseed


    "If a man must be obsessed by something, I suppose a boat is as good as anything, perhaps a bit better than most." E. B. White

  2. #457
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Providence, RI USA
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Wow! She's looking great! I love those cabin sides and front. The bronze port lights will be lovely. Do you have a picture of the patterns? Did Iain draw patterns or are they your design? Perhaps they are shown in your Eun na Mara thread?

    Sorry for so many questions! Very exciting stage of the build.

    Mike
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  3. #458
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    465

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Steve. My wife has the use of two of the smaller rooms in the building (one of them for sewing), so we don't want dust and shavings all through the place. The floor is smooth concrete with good air-space under it, so it stays dry and takes little effort to keep reasonably tidy.
    Here, I am posting a picture of your build for you. It looks much more authentic! I like that big slick too.


    Thanks, Mike. Yes, the bronze rings will be good. They will be cast at Giltech Precision Castings, Dunedin, the same people who cast the ballast. They are very friendly and helpful. Aluminium bronze is stronger than silicon bronze, but a more yellow colour. I will clean them up with a flap disc on my angle grinder and let them go green. The same with the chainplates. Here are a couple of pics of my Eun na Mara hardware, with the deadlight patterns on the right, in November 2006. Those rings were cast by a different foundry. I glued the patterns up at home and cleaned them up on a big lathe at a local high-school evening metalwork class, where I also made the stainless steel bits, with some help, I may say. The other ring is from the Classic Marine (UK) website, just for comparison. I made the "spigots" of mine the same depth as the thickness of the plywood, with plywood rings glued and screwed to the inside.





    Iain's plan had a fullsize cross-section of the deadlight assembly, so I probably took the various diameters off that.
    My Eun na Mara thread/blog/whatever is here: http://www.geoss.com.au/eun_mara/ . You'll get the front page. Scroll down to the links. Thanks to Richard Almond of Canberra, Australia.

    My next move will be the rub-rails, upper and lower, while I can still use my long clamps across the side decks. On my EM and ST I put the lower ones on before the decks were on, using my plywood planking clamps, suitably modified.

    Cheers, and Merry Christmas!
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-21-2018 at 03:50 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  4. #459
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    Schleswig Holstein, Northern Germany
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    51

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Ian your pace and build quality is astonishing! Looks like your boats bottom will hit the water next year...
    i wish you health and joy for the coming year.
    merry christmas
    cheers
    Sönke

  5. #460
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Two lovely updates, Ian, thank you. Worth the wait, as it alway is.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    Last edited by Alex1N; 12-14-2018 at 06:55 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  6. #461
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Sonke and Alex. I am fortunate to be retired and still in good health. I am hoping to be able to launch the boat by the end of February. Thanks for the good wishes. To you likewise.

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-14-2018 at 02:43 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #462
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Haha. Very good. Here's another,


    and another.


    I'm a man of many vices, but I'm trying to come to grips with them.


    Oh dear...

    Thanks for the comment.

    Cheers, Ian


    Edit: (The message that brought on this flurry of punning, based on the 4th photo in #455, seems to have been deleted, but it was perfectly alright, really. As somebody once said, "A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men." Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-21-2018 at 02:54 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  8. #463
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    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    231

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    You can never have too many vices!
    Last edited by Alex1N; 12-15-2018 at 06:02 PM.
    You can never have too many clamps

  9. #464
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Right.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  10. #465
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I'd better do another posting before I get too far ahead of myself.

    I got the rub-rails on OK, over a couple of days, with a borrowed steamer and a helping hand at times, and the "Building a Wee Seal (very slowly)" thread. They are made from some more of those kwila (merbau) decking planks 19 x 90mm, two at 3.9m (13') and two at 3.6m (12'). I could have used all 3.6m planks but the two longer ones enabled me to stagger the scarfs in the middle.

    Here I am tapering the ends of the upper rails from 40 to 30mm. I have already fitted the ends to the stems, cut the scarf in the aft rails in my scarfing jig, and predrilled the counter-bores and screw holes (in that order) at 10" (250mm) centres. (Not sure why the tape measure's there.)


    I did the aft rails first, so that I could fit the scarfs in the forward rails to the scarfs already cut in the aft ones when they were in place. Here's one in the steamer. The steamer is about 10ft (3m) of galvanised pipe with a right-angled bend into a tank at the bottom, 2 ft long by 6" diameter (600 x 150 mm) , with an electric jug element in each end of it. You can use both elements to get it steaming, then switch one off while the wood steams. It works very well. This photo must have been taken when I had just put the rail in. It looked more dramatic later on.


    The forward rails bent around without steaming. I put in the first two screws nearest the stem, and then drilled the rest of the screw holes into the gunwale. Clamp it any way you can!


    I suspended each rail from the overhead while I was getting the first few screws in. Here the rail also happens to be resting on the bench.
    The upper rails are 40mm wide, tapered to 30mm at the ends, and the lower rails are 30mm all the way.


    Here are the views from the port quarter,


    and the starboard bow. I will put separate toe-rails on later, covering the joint between the rub-rail and the deck.


    I will leave the rails dry-fitted for now, until I get my new chainplates in January. The ones I had cast before were designed for rigging screws but I have decided to use lanyards instead. When I have installed the chainplates, I will be able to notch the rails over them. In the meantime I am working on the tabernacle and the forward hatch frame, and will glue them on with the cabin front and sides in the same session.

    All the best for Christmas and the New Year.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  11. #466
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    Dec 2012
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    Providence, RI USA
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    1,429

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    You have a very good eye, sir. carry on!

    Mike
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  12. #467
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thank you, Mr Owen.

    A quick update.
    I didn't glue all those bits on in one session after all. I installed the fore-hatch frame while the deck was still clear, the cabin front and sides in another session, and the rub-rails around the after part of the boat in another, over the last few days. I should have glued the rails before the cabin sides, so I could have clamped the midship ends of the rails better. Never mind. I have made the parts for the tabernacle (out of oak) but am leaving it off until after I have put the cabin roof on, so that I can swing those big pieces of plywood around more easily. My thicknesser died the other day, in smoke and blue flames, so I can't start cutting roof laminations or all the trimming pieces until I can get a new one. I have also replaced the stainless-steel centreboard pivot bolt with an aluminium-bronze one, made the same way as the keel bolts, to be more compatible with the copper-based antifouling.
    Happy New Year!
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  13. #468
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    Mar 2010
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Sounding good - except for the spectacular exit of the thicknesser : (. Bother. I recently acquired a Carbatec benchtop thicknesser, as you know - it seems to be a solid (read, heavy) piece of kit, although I haven’t run it yet. I don’t have shares in Carbatec, by the way.

    My wife-to-be and I spent New Year’s Eve at Lake Te Anau in 1980/81 (then back to Queenstown for New Year’s Night). A lovely, very calm, clear evening with barely a ruffle on the lake. Which latter I managed to disturb by skipping the nice round flat stones on the water’s edge.

    Happy New Year to you, too.
    You can never have too many clamps

  14. #469
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Alex. My thicknesser was a fairly cheap one when I bought it in 2004, so I suppose it has done quite well. I took it apart to determine the cause of death and found that the armature shaft of the motor had a cheap and nasty aluminium fan on it, from which the blades had been breaking. They were the bits of metal being spat out. Then one of them had twisted and jammed the whole thing. There were only four blades left, out of ten or twelve. The rest of the machine seemed pretty strong and solid, so it's a bit of a pity to have to throw it out. Oh well, it'll go in the scrap metal bin anyway.
    I can imagine the scene at Lake Te Anau. I, and we, have spent quite a lot of time on Lakes Te Anau amd Manapouri over the years, by kayak, sailing dory and trailer-sailer, on the edge of Fiordland. Always good, always different.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  15. #470
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hello Ian,

    Ouch! >shudder!<. What a horrible end. Still, 14 years was a pretty good innings - I had an expensive Metabo angle grinder last less than half of that.

    I loved the Te Anau/Fiordland area* - we even went on one of the cruises on Milford sound out to Mitre Peak, though I would rather have done it by sailing boat! And visited the glow-worm caves and the turf-roofed hut. Lovely, lovely trip. The night of the 2nd was spent at a place in Westland, with a helicopter coming in at night in the pouring rain with a dead stag dangling from its skids. Very dramatic.

    I would have loved to have done some sailing while I was in NZ that trip.

    Cheers,
    Alex.

    * Pretty well all of the South Island that we saw (plus Wellington), in fact!
    You can never have too many clamps

  16. #471
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Yes, I know those places quite well, Alex. Glad you enjoyed them.

    We had to go away for the first week of January, for a family occasion. It was good, but not conducive to boatbuilding. Since then I've been making a bit of progress. I usually prefer to work on one thing at a time, but this week I've had three things on the go - the galley, the cockpit coamings and the rudder.

    Here's a photo of the galley, with the doors open. I am gluing some strange tapered pieces around the door openings to support the doors when they are shut. They will close flush with that narrow piece in the middle. I could have made the whole thing in one line, parallel with the centreline, but that would have been too easy! The arrangement of the shelves is still evolving.


    Here's a random shot of the coamings, on stand-by until I get back to them. You can see where they need a bit of trimming, before they will sit down properly.


    And here comes the rudder. I made a wallpaper pattern of it from the lofting, ages ago, and drew around it onto the plywood months ago. I am making it from two layers of 18mm 13-ply. I tried to follow Ewan Kennedy's suggestion of increasing the area of the blade, but could only gain a liitle bit as the two layers were drawn quite close together. (Well, I could have drawn it all again, I suppose.... )


    This is a trial fitting with the wooden patterns of the rudder fittings in place, usng one layer of the rudder. In the cardboard box is a 3.87 litre (1 US gallon) tin of Sikkens Cetol Marine, Natural Teak, for the exterior brightwork, including masts and spars. (I might need more than that.)


    The big rudder glue-up.


    Cleaning up the edges, with a variety of implements.

    Today I fitted the cast aluminium-bronze rudder fittings to the hull and the rudder. I will have to get some more gear to drill the holes in them.

    Tomorrow is another day...

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  17. #472
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Looking great, Ian! Is that four or five thicknesses of 9 mm ply for the rudder? Lovely shape to it.

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  18. #473
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Alex. The rudder is two layers of 18mm plywood, plus the cheeks made of the same stuff. Iain says 22 or 25 mm hardwood for the cheeks, but I reckon the 18mm plywood will do just as well. I might put some narrower strips of kwila or something down the outsides, just for show.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  19. #474
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    We have a rudder! It took most of yesterday to drill all the holes in the fittings and today to hang it, but it is indisputably a rudder!

    I did a couple of other odd jobs along the way. This shows where I poured some slightly thickened epoxy down into the lower corner of the motor well, so that water won't sit in there. It looks OK.


    Here I am checking to see that the plug for the cockpit drain won't hit the motor. It looks OK too. I'll make the plug tomorrow.


    Now for the exciting part - drilling the rudder fittings. These are the ones I had cast for me in 2017, out of aluminium-bronze.


    I had to use various clamping arrangements.


    Here they are, ready to install.


    And here they are, installed. They are bonded with epoxy containing glue powder and high-density filler, as well as the machine-screws.


    The plans have a Norwegian tiller, but the tiller will have a lot of rise and fall with this amount of rake in the stern post.

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 01-17-2019 at 01:37 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  20. #475
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Very nice Ian. Those castings look great! Proper job, carry on.

  21. #476
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Ian. I'm pleased with it too.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  22. #477
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    This will have to be a double dose, before I get too far ahead of myself. I've been having a fairly good run at it lately, making a variety of parts, so these photos are a bit of a mixture.

    Here's the plug for the cockpit drain, made from an offcut of an old mast.


    And here is the plug, in place. I will seal the wood, and glue some closed-cell foam around the business end. The motor has an alternator in it now. I had to try it in the boat again to design the hatch over it. It had to be a sliding hatch, but there was not enough clearance to have it flush with the deck.


    Lots of parts for the sliding hatch and mizzen surround, arranged ready for gluing.


    The after deck, in progress. The holes are to let the air flow around the motor. We found that the motor on our Eun na Mara Islesburgh seemed to run a bit roughly on our first outing, so I drilled holes like these and it was OK after that. The front of the slide will be supported across the opening. You will see that in due course.


    A lid to hide the potty. It has a piece of closed-cell foam glued inside the top. You can walk on it.

    The forward hatch is to the Maurice Griffiths design. This attempt is a bit rough so I am going to do it again. I have positioned the hatch so that the lid can be tied back to the tabernacle when it's open.


    Well, that's six photos, so I'll post this now and then carry on. See you soon!
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  23. #478
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    So, here we are again...

    This is the 75Ah AGM battery, secured in place under the quarter-berth.


    This is my new toy - er - thicknesser. It's a jointer as well.


    Here's the rudder, ready for painting, and the stem shaped. I cut a pair of trim pieces from an old mahogany bed-end. Hmm.. the mahogany doesn't match the kwila rub-rails very well, does it. I had intended to leave the castings as they came and paint them, but by popular request I polished them up with a flap-disc on my angle-grinder, and fine black sandpaper. They came up very nicely.


    The galley, open...


    and closed, as a settee. My wife, Alison, has been busy making the squabs. There will be a padded back rest of some sort. Some hardware still to come.


    And the last one for today, the new chainplates and deadlights , from our friendly local foundry.


    OK, I'll go and do some work now. The job for today is to take off the forward rub-rails, notch them for the chainplates, install the chainplates, glue and screw the rub-rails back on, and fair in the scarf joints to the aft rails.

    The Kotik sail plans, sloop and yawl, do not show the chainplates, but the Wee Seal plans do, so I measured the angle of the side stays to the waterline, in profile, and found that it was 85 degrees in both versions. Then I drew the stays in on the Kotik sail plans from the mast band to the sheer at the same angle. For the yawl version this came at 25 1/2 inches (650 mm) aft of the cabin front, so that's where I'm going to put the chainplates. I have abandoned the idea of having a convertible sloop or yawl rig, as too complicated. I like a yawl!

    For interest, the chainplates on the Wee Seal sloop are 1/3 of the way back from the cabin front along the length of the cabin side, and for the yawl they are 1/4 of the way. For the Kotik, with its taller mast, the distances are 1/2 and 1/3 respectively. These are not precise measurements, but seem reasonable.

    If you're still with me, thanks for coming this far.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 02-12-2019 at 04:35 AM. Reason: sp.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  24. #479
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    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Powering along, Ian! I like the look of the new toy, too .

    I suppose you could stain the mahogany a bit darker to match the kwila?

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  25. #480
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Alex. I'm going to use an oil stain on all the exterior brightwork, so we'll see how it turns out.
    It took a while to drill the holes in the chainplates, so I only got about halfway along that list of processes, but that's OK...
    NZ has been getting the end of your heat wave this week, up to 34 degrees C in some places but only 26 here. Good for epoxy! Quite pleasant, in fact.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  26. #481
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I need to move to somewhere there is a friendly local foundry..... nice work. If you are going to paint that hatch, epoxy will love all those gaps, and we wont tell anyone!

  27. #482
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    It all looks very well thought through Ian.

    Marianita has a version of the MG hatch, it is a nice simple design that does a really good job of ventilating the boat while keeping the rain and vermin out. I use a pair of small cleats coupled with some light line to keep it in place. Hiding the galley while creating seating is brilliant. I've been thinking about how to get a comfortable seat in my cabin, in practice the cabin/deck corner hits me in a good spot across the shoulders but it would be nice to get a little lower back support.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  28. #483
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for that, Ian. There's nothing wrong with the forward hatch frame that a good blob or two of epoxy won't fix, and yes, it will be painted. Nobody will ever know! Yay for epoxy! (I don't want to waste too much time now.)

    Thanks, Steve. I wouldn't have known about the Maurice Griffiths hatch except that Kathy Mansfield ("the well known boating writer") said that the Eun na Mara had it, in a review of the prototype EM, Minna. I think it was the one in Practical Boatowner, August 2000. The one on the Kotik is the same. You can see it, here: file:///C:/Users/Ian%20Milne/Downloads/856griffithshatches.pdf . Our forward hatch on Islesburgh never let a drop of water in. Glad you like Alison's galley design. We think it will work pretty well. In EM Islesburgh, we used to stack cushions, or the squabs for the double berth, up under the side decks to sit back against. The shelf on the port side of our Kotik cabin is also at quite a good height for a backrest.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  29. #484
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    465

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I'm getting ahead of myself again. Here is a Batch of Hatches. (Sorry - couldn't resist that.) I did them about a week ago, but haven't finished cleaning them up yet.

    Here are the hatches on the after-deck. The tiller-handle of the motor will fold back into that slot beside the sliding hatch. The front of the hatch will be supported on a beam across the the opening, which will be part of the trim. (That will become clear later.) This is pretty much a copy of Steve "stromborg's" arrangement. Thanks, Steve. The port side hatch-lid will hinge back against the mizzen mast.


    and another view:


    This is the frame of the forward hatch. You can see the drain holes in the back corners of the outer coaming. I did this a bit differently from the hatch of EM Islesburgh, in which the back piece was not connected at the corners, but both ways are OK. This is the original hatch I built on this job. I didn't build another one like I was going to.


    Gluing the frame of the lid. The side pieces are pinned to the outer coaming with 40 x 1.6 mm nails in 2mm holes.


    The lid on. I had to build up the outer coaming with a thin strip all around.


    The lid will open back against the tabernacle. The epoxy filled the joints OK. It still needs some cleaning up.


    A couple of our Eun na Mara friends from Australia visited us for a few days last week, on a tour of NZ. Ron did some painting and helped me improve my sharpening technique. The motor well is primed now and the well and the rudder below the waterline have three coats of antifouling, the same as the hull.

    For the last couple of days I have been pussy-footing around the framing pieces for the cabin-house. I usually like to make a whole bunch of parts and then have a big glue-up, but sometimes I get so many parts lying around that I have to glue some of them in before I can do anything else. Last night I glued the top rails along the sides. The inner carlins are ready to glue in, and then I can fit the vertical pieces to them, and make patterns for the roof-beams.

    Now I'll go and take the clamps off.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 02-13-2019 at 02:02 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  30. #485
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Blaxland, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    231

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Looking great! Is the outboard throttle slot the space between the two hatches and in front of the mizzen step? I’m slightly confused (doesn’t take much ).

    Cheers! Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  31. #486
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    465

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Yes. We will be able to have the throttle handle vertical or horizontal, but will have to slide the hatch out to change it. You will see what I mean when I put the trim on.
    Ian.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  32. #487
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    465

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Here are some of the last week's photos, to bring us up to date.

    Here's the rudder, so far. The grey bit is primer.


    Here are the top stringer and the inner carlin, glued on, not screwed. The other side is the same. The stringer is continuous. The carlin is in two pieces. I got squeeze-out all the way along, so there must be enough clamps.


    I put the top stringer a little high to allow for fairing, but the side panel was already too high at the after end of it, so I am raising the bulkhead slightly.


    Sorry, this one is a bit out of focus. The beam patterns seemed to be OK in the middle but too low at the ends.


    After a lot of fiddling around I altered the patterns (made from Iain's drawings) to give the base-lines between the top inner corners of the top stringers, including the main bulkhead. These are at each station and halfway between. To measure the crown of each one I stretched a string across between the stringers and measured the distance up to the straight-edge on the centreline above. Then I plotted the standard geometrical technique on them to see if they differed. These are the patterns shown here. I still have to play around a bit with the forward cabin bulkhead (station 4). I found that the standard technique gives curves that are lower at the quarters, so I will stay with Iain's design. It gives a little more headroom.
    i

    They lined up pretty well. The short blocks are glued to the patterns with hot-melt glue.


    Now, back to work. I hope to be making the laminated beams today.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 02-14-2019 at 01:49 PM. Reason: Correction to beam plotting.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  33. #488
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Schleswig Holstein, Northern Germany
    Posts
    51

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Lovely Boat!
    like to watch her grow…
    Cheers
    Sönke

  34. #489
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    465

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Sonke. Sorry for the slow reply. It's good to have your encouragement. The laminated beams are made, and I hope to assemble the cabin roof framing tomorrow, (but tomorrow usually turns into three days).
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

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