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Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #421
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Nice work Ian, keep going!

  2. #422
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Oh, I wasn't paying attention. Sjogin IIIa it is. I see you're already well on the way. I'll be watching. Thanks, Steve.
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 11-08-2018 at 05:11 AM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  3. #423
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Ian.
    I'll be making the deck patterns next.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  4. #424
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I have made all the patterns for the deck, by spreading wallpaper over the framing to correspond with the layout in the rough scale drawing above, and marking through. Today I made the patterns for the cabin sides and cockpit coamings by building mock-ups of them with pieces of my well-used 3mm MDF, which have already served as planking patterns for the Sooty Tern and spiling battens for the Kotik, and hot-melt glue. Very useful, that.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  5. #425
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian

    It's great to see your progress, with a lot more care than I've been taking. I've been getting on, as you'll see from the annexed images. I've a couple of comments for your interest.

    After a great deal of thought I've got rid of the outboard well altogether, which took longer than building it in the first place. I was always unhappy about having petrol engine in the boat, let alone having it staring in my face, but apart from the safety aspect the reasoning was as follows.

    I happen to own a Mercury 3hp two stroke, which I bought brand new around 2000 intending to use it on Stroma, but never used. It's a nice light unit that I can lift easily and the well was built for it. From discussions with friends who've tried running these things in wells I convinced myself that they don't really work well, as the engine tends to suffocate. I decided not to risk that and considered a four stroke, but apart from the cost they're extremely heavy and bulky and storage would be a problem.

    This led me to consider an electric unit, of which there are now some extremely good examples around. This seems to be the way to go, but they have a very slow running propellor of about twelve inches diameter, which is far too big for a well. They are very light and the battery being detachable makes hanging on a bracket over the side very easy.

    I haven't made a final decision. If the boat turns out fine I may instal an electric power pod under the hull alongside the ballast keel. Some thought needed, as they're about 5000 Euros.

    I may just end up sailing about without an engine, as I did with Stroma for many years. You get to find some lovely new anchorages when the wind drops.

    I'm also having thoughts about the rudder as drawn by Iain. He's got the widest part near the surface, where it does least good, and rudders hung on this type of sloped stern are always bound to be inefficient. Mikhail Markov, who as you know has the prototype White Fang, found the boat hard to steer and has redesigned his rudder to increase the area. I'm struggling with the options here, which are either increase the area down below, which produces an enormous rudder, or add a hinged section that can swing down vertically, as Paul Gartside has done with his Sjogin III design, as far as I can see. A bad idea is a fixed section below the line of the keel, especially if like me you have an acquaintance with reefs and skerries.

    Finally I've added a photo of Iain with his future apprentice inspecting progress earlier this year.

    Best wishes from Scotland!

    Ewan

    IMG_4535 (2).jpgIMG_4514.jpgIMG_4588.jpgIMG_3710 (1).jpg
    Ewan G Kennedy

  6. #426
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ewan,

    Thanks for the photos and comments. Nice to have a photo of Iain on my thread. Your Kotik looks as if it's coming on pretty well too. (http://scottishboating.blogspot.com/)

    We were quite happy with our outboard motor in the well of our Eun na Mara Islesburgh. It seemed to run a bit roughly the first time out, in the well with the lid on, but after I made ventilation holes in the back of the lid it ran very well, including a couple of occasions when we would have been in big trouble if it had stopped.

    Our new motor is essentially the same motor as Islesburgh's - a 6 hp 4stroke Tohatsu. For bulk, I built the well to fit the motor. For weight, yes, at 27kg it was as heavy as I wanted to lift, and that not any more often than I had to. For storage, we just left it in the well, except when I took it out for servicing. OK, it probably caused a bit of drag when we were sailing, but we tolerated that. I manhandled it as little as possible. You can see it on my part of Richard Almond's website: http://www.geoss.com.au/eun_mara/index.htm. On Richard's own part of the website, you will see his electric pod motor.

    I will leave the rudder as designed. I like the hook on the back, and the rounded shape probably won't hit the ground on part of our driveway. The EM's rudder had a retractable plate in it. Ours worked OK but was a complicated thing to make, and heavy.

    Here are a couple of pics of a small Zulu we saw at the Scottish Traditional Boat Festival at Portsoy in 2015.





    Thanks again for your comments.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 11-12-2018 at 02:19 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  7. #427
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    ^ Took me a moment to see the big hole for the outboard! I dont think there should be any issues with drawing out the length of the bottom of the rudder, kind of normal a shallow draft. My Folkboat rudder was very slim at the bottom, but more than 4ft of it was submerged. I had not read that Mikhail had issues, and he never mentioned it when we had contact, but good to know of any issue, maintaining steerage is pretty important!

  8. #428
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for that, Ian. When we were on Kotik Pura Vida in June last year she steered alright. However, I haven't made my rudder yet so I could easily fill it out a bit without being too obvious about it. There is a plan of a 42' Zulu here, showing the rudder, on Lupussonic's thread: http://lupussonic.com/FTP/Original%2...20-%20Copy.JPG

    I've got all the deck parts clamped in place now, ready to drill the screw holes.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  9. #429
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I wanted to get the deck on before I did another posting, but it has taken longer than I expected. Well, what's new in that? Starting from #413, this will have to be a double dose.

    Here's a photo of the wallpaper deck patterns, taped in place. I daresay butt-plates underneath would be acceptable for joining the panels but I decided to scarf them, so the patterns overlap. I wouldn't have minded a bit more concavity in the foredeck profile.


    And here's the rest of it. As you've seen earlier, the kingplank is in two pieces, but the plywood gives it a smooth line. I made the scarf in the other direction than shown here to keep the outside of the join in line with the bulkhead, but it's supposed to be invisible anyway so it wouldn't have mattered. I'll make the hatch covers later.


    Here's how they worked out on the plywood.




    Scarfing the side panels was done just like the hull planking. The after end of this top piece butts onto the afterdeck panel, on the gunwale, so there is no need to scarf it. The other end of the lower piece I cut individually, but I could have done it as a pair with the one for the other side. I made sure they were all the same length.


    These ones I cut individually. I cut the "gain" with my pull-saw, then made a wide groove with the side of the rebate plane, and finished it with the other planes. Sometimes I used the electric plane, sometimes I didn't. The Stanley 4 1/2 has a good heft to it.


    That's it, up to a week ago. Now, to continue...

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  10. #430
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Having cut out and scarfed the deck panels, I decided the forepeak needed a bit of reinforcing to take the pull of the forestay and roller furler, so I put in a sort of breasthook made of a piece of 140mm kwila grooved deck planking, up under the inwales with a packing piece between it and the kingplank, slathered with plenty of glue.


    For this photo I held the camera through the inspection hatch in the forward bulkhead and aimed it in the general direction.


    I'll spare you all the trial fitting photos, getting all the screw holes in the right places. On Tuesday I did a bit of doctoring of the framing and general fussing around, and got the first two panels glued on. I had to start with the starboard cockpit side panel, because of the way I had cut the scarfs, followed by the after deck on the same side. The next day I got the other side of the afterdeck on, and the other three side panels.


    During the last trial fitting I had marked the undersides of the panels to show where the framing was, and then put unthickened resin on the spaces between (two coats on the same day), and sanded them the next day with my r.o.s., 60 grit. Before I glued them on, I put a third coat on those parts of the after deck panels and the side panels forward as far as the main cabin bulkhead. The rest will be painted later.


    So here she is, with the deck on. The two foredeck panels were a full day's work, yesterday. There's the sun again,


    The foredeck looks quite broad and sturdy. For all the panels, I used permanent screws in the inner edges and temporary ones around the gunwales. I will take those ones out this afternoon and fill the holes. For that I use wooden skewers, pushed in with glue and broken off. The gunwales will have plenty of screws in them later, with the rub rails and toe rails.


    The next jobs will be to fibreglass the deck, install the Samson post and build the cabin front and sides. Then I will complete the interior and do most of the electrical work.

    The sails arrived last week too - a gunter main, a roller jib and a jib-headed mizzen - from "Southern Sails", Nelson, New Zealand. They are cream colour, with leather trimmings. They look good!

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 11-23-2018 at 03:59 AM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  11. #431
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Cracking on Ian. Your turn to have some sun i guess, we will be at zero in the day and minus at night for the next week. I have a cunning plan to epoxy my keel planks.
    How is your epoxy to sand the next day, any gumming up of that 60 grit?

  12. #432
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian,
    It sounds like your winter is much like ours. Our daytime temperature this week has been around 17 degrees C. The epoxy (WEST 105/205) sanded perfectly well the next day. Sometimes in winter I have had to leave the sanding to another day. Yesterday, Thursday 22nd, was fine, but in the days before that we had torrential rainfall causing flooding in parts of the district, and more rain is expected next week. November 2017 was the driest on record. This November is heading to be the wettest.
    What are you building now? Oh, I just found your thread, "Cement and re-bar ballast casting". That's a very impressive piece of work! (I was a builder's labourer for six months, in my youth.) I will await further developments.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  13. #433
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I really struggle with the lack of sun, and the cold does not help. Having a bigger boat in the pipeline is my sanity project, im actually struggling to slow myself down on bashing out all the small detail.....winters are long. I started a new thread regarding that chunk of re-bar and concrete...
    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...el-motorsailer

    Look forward to seeing those new sails set, probably not as much as you though!

  14. #434
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Congrats on this milestone Ian. She's looking great.
    Travis.

  15. #435
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for the links, Ian. That's a serious project alright.
    Did you mean Fahrenheit? That would be not like our winter at all! There is plenty of snow inland from here in winter, and some here but not a lot.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  16. #436
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Travis. Good to hear from you.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  17. #437
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hello Ian,

    Looking very good indeed. There does appear to be concavity in the foredeck profile (by extrapolation) - is it better than you were expecting?

    Cheers,
    Alex.
    You can never have too many clamps

  18. #438
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Alex. I'm pleased that you can see a bit of concavity in the centreline of the deck. There is some in the afterdeck too. It's not meant to be very obvious, but just to avoid the optical illusion that the deck has a hump in it, as it could look if the kingplank was straight. The plans give the "crown" of each deckbeam and I made them that way. Theoretically, the kingplank should form a smooth curve from the stem to the cabin, but with it being in three pieces I made it in straight lengths, so perhaps the concavity is not as much as it might have been, but it's OK. Ideally I should have made the kingplank in one piece and cut the bits out for the Samson post and the forehatch after the glue had cured, like I did with the cockpit carlin on the port side, but I didn't have a long enough piece of wood just then...
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  19. #439
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Thanks for the links, Ian. That's a serious project alright.
    Did you mean Fahrenheit? That would be not like our winter at all! There is plenty of snow inland from here in winter, and some here but not a lot.
    Ian
    No thats in Celsius Ian. It was minus 6 in the conservatory this morning, so the epoxy is a bit rubbery. There is a warm front expected next week that might lift the temperture back to + single figures, i will have to hold off till then, i cant raise the temps out there enough.
    I do recall seeing some snow on Mt Cook when i was down that way, but compared to the minus 45 i have been living with the last few winters, its still kind of warm down there! I do recall a Christmas photo from my Aunt in Omaru with the kids playing in snow, and on boxing day, in shorts and T shirts.......that was many years ago before "global warming" became a common expression.

  20. #440
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    A big next step with the decks on Ian.
    You΄re nearly ready to go sailing ;-)
    Good idea with the wallpaper patterns!

  21. #441
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    That's good, Ian. Sorry, I was forgetting that you have family here, so you know our winters are fairly mild compared with yours. School holidays are from Christmas to the end of January, but the weather often doesn't settle down until February. This November has been the wettest on record.

    Hi Max, Thanks for the comment. I fibreglassed the deck today. I've just trimmed it tonight. It looks even better now. I'm looking forward to the launching!
    I used the wallpaper patterns again for cutting out the fibreglass pieces, a bit oversize. If you like that idea, it's yours!

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  22. #442
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I do love these designs.
    The definition of stupid has got to be the belief that more guns will negate the bloodshed done with guns.

  23. #443
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for looking in, WX. I just had a quick flick at your Redwing thread. It looks very comprehensive. I have subscribed!
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  24. #444
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Here are some pics of fibreglassing the deck. It's all standard stuff really.

    I have a piece of blue plastic the same width (1m) as the roll of 'glass, so I laid out the patterns on it and found I needed 7.5m, including
    the 3 deck hatches. For the coachroof and sliding hatch, I will use 5 more.


    So I unrolled the 'glass and arranged the patterns on it, and cut them out, a bit oversized. Here, the foredeck patterms are rolled up in the 'glass.


    The pieces laid out on the deck, in the morning.


    Epoxied, in the afternoon. (I used a yellow foam roller, and cleaned the roller handle with acetone and white vinegar.)


    Trimmed, at the leathery stage, in the evening.


    A good day's work, though I say so myself.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  25. #445
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Wonderfull! What a fast progress.
    But it is so sad that the beautiful Interior is hidden by deck now... ;-)
    Regards
    Sφnke

  26. #446
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Quote Originally Posted by IanMilne View Post
    Thanks for looking in, WX. I just had a quick flick at your Redwing thread. It looks very comprehensive. I have subscribed!
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Yours has more style Ian.
    The definition of stupid has got to be the belief that more guns will negate the bloodshed done with guns.

  27. #447
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Sonke. You're right, she doesn't look quite so interesting now. I'll see if I can do something about that!
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  28. #448
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Super-sleek : )
    You can never have too many clamps

  29. #449
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Yes indeedy a good days work! You have even got a door open!

  30. #450
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Alex, Ian and WX. I have a cold now so I haven't done anything today.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  31. #451
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Oh no, get well soon!
    You can never have too many clamps

  32. #452
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Alex. I'm a bit better today. I did some more to my chainplate pattern this morning, to take to the foundry on Monday, if I'm OK by then. I probably should have organised the chainplates ages go. The plans just have a straight strap with a hole in the top for a rigging screw, but I want to use lanyards.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  33. #453
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    This is a very nice build. I enjoyed looking at the pictures and the progress and look forward to seeing her launched.
    Will

  34. #454
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for looking, willmarsh3. Glad you like it. It's been a bit slow the last few days but I'm getting back onto it.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  35. #455
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi guys,
    Just a quick update. I've been been a bit busy lately.

    I spent a few days painting the for'd deckhead, which was rather an awkward job, but we get those, don't we? Photos of white paint are rather boring, so I'll spare you most of those. The Samson post got installed too, somewhere along the way.

    Here's the general view. Over the epoxy it got one primer, one undercoat and two topcoats, so it should be good for quite a while.


    Here's a detail of the construction without a compression post. The big knee with backing pads was indicated in the sketch Iain sent me after I had bought the plans, and the cabin front will be double thickness to form part of the beam. Looks like a touch-up is still needed. The laminated frame forward of it (where the "10" is) is extra to the plans, and the beam there is made of oak. The rest of the framing is macrocarpa. I could have made that knee wider too, but I didn't think of it at the time. These two beams will support the tabernacle.


    I painted the insides of the cave lockers grey, just for a bit of variety. The coamings, seats and bulkheads will be white, and the footwell grey.


    Now, moving on to the next stage, I cut out the cabin front and sides from my new sheets of plywood, and glued the two layers of the front together. Here I am gluing a strip along the lower edge to hide the edge of the plywood. The sides use the same idea but as the strips are only 3/8'" square I glued and nailed them along the carlins first. I pre-drilled the strips and used small ring-nails.


    This is a dry fitting of the cabin front and sides, so now we can see what she looks like. Pretty good, I may say.


    If you look carefully along the side panel you can see a small temporary screw in the deck, holding the forward extension in the correct line, so that it doesn't spring outwards. Aluminium-bronze rings for the deadlights will be cast locally in January. The specs are for 5" and 4" deadlights, but I am using the 6" and 4" patterns that I made for my Eun na Mara in 2006.


    Well, that's all for now, folks.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 12-14-2018 at 02:29 PM. Reason: 2006
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

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