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Thread: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

  1. #316
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
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    Vancouver. WA
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    1

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    I've just discovered this thread a couple days ago, and read it from top to bottom over the last day while I should have been working.

    Fascinating education you've given me! Thank you!

  2. #317
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Thebastidge. Glad if it helps. Are you thinking of building something?
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  3. #318
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Now, where was I? Oh yes, there!

    Here is a photo of laying out part of the interior framing. You can see a couple of the typical joints.


    Here are the rest of the framing pieces with the undersides given two coats of epoxy on the same day. Our school-holiday visitor cut some of them for me.


    After I had glued all the framing pieces in, I laid out the wallpaper patterns on the relevant parts and marked where to cut them to make the fixed pieces and the removable hatches. Then I cut them up and spent an evening arranging them as economically as possible on three sheets of MDF (my lofting, as it happens) representing three sheets of plywood, plus three of the smaller pieces on some plywood off-cuts, which included the piece I had cut out of the main bulkhead for the quarter-berth. I have one full sheet of 9mm ply left, plus enough for one side-deck, out of my original 14 sheets. I will need more for the deck and cabin-house.






    And here are the pieces of the forward bunk-top laid out where they will go. I have done the same with the other parts of the boat, and will have a fair amount of fitting and fiddling to get them all sitting down properly. The two that are shaped like a lug-sail and the one on the left will lift out and the rest will be glued in, after I have epoxied them all on the underside. I have also given the entire bottom of the hull and all areas that will be hidden behind other parts another coat of epoxy. I am not going to paint them. This is as good as they get!


    Well, that's the present situation.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  4. #319
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    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    401

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    A bit more progress...

    Cockpit seat panels in position. The seats look fairly high here but they are according to the plan and the coamings come almost to the top of the cabin sides. Sitting on the seats , we can both see over the roof.



    The "engine room". This is my third stern like this, after the Eun na Mara and Sooty Tern.


    General view through the boat.


    This is the front of the "settee", where the galley will be, made up out of plywood off-cuts. I alternated the wide and narrow pieces. I glued them all in and filletted around the edges.


    Here are all the panels, given three coats of epoxy on the undersides, all on the same day, yesterday. I used 150 mm (6") yellow foam roller covers, one for each coat. I rolled each one in a shallow tray of epoxy thinner halfway through to make it last the distance. I was using fast hardener and Dunedin had a record-breaking temperature of 35 degrees C. It was 26C, (80F) in the workshop. The raised pieces will be the removable hatches.



    I have to go out now.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 02-01-2018 at 03:35 AM. Reason: hatches
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  5. #320
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    Rushworth Australia
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    2,793

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Great work Ian, you’re making fantastic progress

  6. #321
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    Lake Norman,North Carolina and Cedarville, Michigan
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    203

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Ian,
    Looking great. Following with great interest.
    May I ask the size of your "motor well" in the "engine compartment? I'm thinking of adding one to my build and I haven't figured out how to size it unless I have the outboard already, and I don't. What HP are you going to run?
    Thanks.
    -Jim

  7. #322
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Andrew. I'm having a fairly good run at it just now.
    "jtdums", welcome aboard, as they say. The internal measurements of the motor well (inside the plywood lining) are: width 8 1/4 " (210 mm), length 10 1/2 " (270 mm), and the depth at the centre-front is 17 1/4" ( 435 mm) to suit a standard-shaft motor. I lowered the mounting 2" (50 mm). I will be enclosing the top of the motor too, but the measurements are not critical. I will make a slot or holes at the back of the lid to allow air to flow through. This was necessary on my Eun na Mara. Here are some pics of my EM well.




    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  8. #323
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    401

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    P.S. to jtdums. The above measurements are not critical. 9' x 11' x 17" would be just as good. For all three of my boats with a motor well, I have bought the motor before I built the well.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  9. #324
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Lake Norman,North Carolina and Cedarville, Michigan
    Posts
    203

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks Ian. I appreciate the follow up. That is about what I would have guessed, but it is reassuring to see it in print and being used on such a nice looking build.
    Build on!
    -Jim

  10. #325
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    401

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Jim. Oh, and the motor is a 6hp Evinrude/Tohatsu 4-stroke.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  11. #326
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Bainbridge Island WA
    Posts
    2,475

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Does Kotik have a space to store the outboard? One of the minor annoyances of EM is having to keep the OB in the cockpit where it is in the way or soaking (like it does at the PTWBF) while spending time on the boat. While I can't quantify how much is created, the idea of the drag created by the motor and hole in the bottom of the boat have always bothered me too. After a few years of use I am starting to think that most of the time I could get away with something like a Torqueedo that would fit in the cockpit lockers for 90% of the daysailing I do.

    Your interior is coming along nicely.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  12. #327
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Steve,

    Your question is very timely. I have been working on that very thing. Following my experiences with the other boats, I have always intended to make some kind of notch in the middle bulkhead of the starboard cockpit locker to support the motor if I wanted to put it in there. Not that I will, necessarily, but I think it's a good option if the boat is to be kept on a mooring or in a marina, like yours.

    I glued in all those plywood panels last week for the bunk-tops and such, except the hatches, of course. They are all ready for sanding now. I left them to cure some more while I got on with the cockpit lockers. Here is the forward cabin. I made the filler with wood-dust saved from my belt-sander. It looks redder in the photo than it actually is.


    The "saloon", quarter-berth and settee. The hatch nearest the camera, port side, will be for the battery. The open space opposite it will be a sort of open hanging locker, so that we can hang wet gear on the inside of the bulkhead and it can drip into that space. The galley will be on that side.


    The "engine room" and petrol locker.


    The cockpit, dry assembly.


    The fuel locker and hatch frame. I had to lower the shelf. On our trips with Islesburgh, we put our rubbish in the fuel locker. It went down under the tanks.


    And this is what you've been waiting to see, Steve, the motor in the starboard locker. I've been working on this all day, with help at times from Alison. I cut the notch for the motor-shaft too big so this is just a cardboard pattern so far. The motor will need a small platform under it too, and some way of lashing it down. We used the Handy Billy to lift the motor up from the workshop floor, but I won't have that luxury if I ever do this on the water. The motor weighs 27kg. On my "Southern Sooty Tern" thread you can see how I put that motor into the stern locker, but that motor is only half the weight of this one. On my Eun na Mara Islesburgh, we just left the motor in the well all the time. I don't know how much drag it made but didn't worry about it.


    Well, it's getting late, so I'll leave it there.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  13. #328
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    Sep 2010
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    2,793

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Great work Ian, I’m watching how you do the cockpit locker lids for ideas, especially the gutters around the edges.

  14. #329
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    401

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Andrew. I found your thread "cockpit lockers" and had a look at George "debenriver's" design, here http://www.whisstock.com/images/165/165_009_006.pdf, where I got the idea for a sloping gutter. Thanks, George. Like that, they would have taken up too much space in the locker, so I kept the aft one flat and put the forward one on the other side of the bulkhead, with just a moderate slope, if you see what I mean. I also made the gutters a bit bigger than in the plans. Like you, I wouldn't want drain holes through the planking. The channels along the back and the aft end are made from a piece of macrocarpa which was part of a mould spreader, 45 x 45 mm, with the channel cut with my router, 12 x 20 mm. The other one is built up against the bulkhead with a scrap piece of recycled Oregon (D. fir) 20 x 32 mm. sloping down to below the rail of the seat frame, and a piece of plywood to make the outside of the channel. Not sure how I'll do the lid on the starboard locker yet. Something similar, I guess. Here's another photo. I haven't glued it yet.


    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  15. #330
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    Sep 2010
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    Bainbridge Island WA
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    2,475

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!



    That looks smaller than my 6hp Tohatsu. Nice solution, I would need to do some pretty major surgery to the cockpit benches at this point.

    Are you running your fuel line through the bulkhead to the motor or just through the cockpit? One day I'd like to add a 90 degree elbow off the motor, every once in a while I manage to accidentally disconnect the line by bumping into it.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  16. #331
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    We just tried turning it around. This is better. I will modify the bulkhead support accordingly. The propeller end is lower in relation to the motor, and it isn't actually touching anything.

    (2 photos gone AWOL.)




    I brought the fuel line through the seat front on Islesburgh. I will probably do this one the same way.

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 03-05-2018 at 04:12 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  17. #332
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    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    401

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Now I've found that if I have one long locker lid on this side, with a straight hinge-line, the middle of it will be too narrow to get the motor in and out this way around. Hmmm, back to the thinking chair .... I will look for a way of putting the motor on its correct side, but with the motor-head nearest the cabin. It will need a new supporting beam, forward of the part-bulkhead and at an angle. Watch this space...
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  18. #333
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Dunno if it’ll help Ian but I was thinking of having the locker lid drop over the side/front of the cockpit seat so it would in effect make for a larger opening. Sorta like a car boot lid on a sedan.

  19. #334
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks for that suggestion, Andrew. Yes, I do know what you mean. I've seen one like that, somewhere.
    I had to do other things today, but tonight I have tried some other ways of putting the motor in the locker and securing it in place, and decided that the only practical and sensible way of doing it is the one I tried first, as in #327 and #330. If it's hard to do, it's not going to happen. If I just lower the motor directly into the locker, with suitable padding, and don't try to manouevre it into some awkward position, then it will fit quite easily through the plain hatch lid if I make it the same length as the motor. I don't expect to be doing it much anyway. It's just an available option.
    Steve, I can assure you that my motor is not smaller than yours. It's a later model of the one I had in Islesburgh, which is the same as yours. The boat is wider, so the hatch must be too.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  20. #335
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Ballard
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    7,957

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    What if the motor rested in a sling made of seatbelt or firehouse material? That would take some of pressure off your lower back when you lowered the motor down into the hatch. You'd just have to get the motor over the edge and then the sling would cushion the landing. I would acknowledge this could be considered a solution to a problem that doesn't exist.

    (Also, motors = ugh.)
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  21. #336
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Tim. I'll investigate that today, combined with padding under the motor.

    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  22. #337
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Between interruptions today I managed to do some more trial fitting of the motor in the cockpit locker, using a batten as a dummy for the back of the clear opening. The overall width of the motor-head is 13 1/2 inches (say 14"). Yay, it fits! This would be its position if it was tilted up on a transom.





    I'm part way through building the channels around the opening now. The motor is resting quite solidly on its front handle, on a hard-foam boogie board. I'll add a strap later, to take some of the weight and stop the motor from tilting sideways. Thanks for your input.

    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 03-05-2018 at 04:14 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  23. #338
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    Jan 2010
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    Northern Europe
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    9,073

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Going very well Ian, nice jigsaw work with the patterns, best way to avoid excessive waste.

  24. #339
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks Ian. Yes, I try to use marine plywood as economically as I can.

    I have made all the parts for the cockpit lockers now and hope to get them glued up today.

    Ian

  25. #340
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Yep, I got the cockpit seat and hatch frames glued together and in place, this afternoon. We're taking Sooty Tern Trondra out for a sail tomorrow.
    Ian

  26. #341
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    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    We had a good day out with Sooty Tern Trondra, on 16th February, on the tidal part of a river not far south of here.

    Here is Kotik as she was on the 25th.


    And here are all these hidden spaces, glued in, filletted,sanded and sealed.

    The "trotter box" of the quarter berth:


    The port cockpit locker, showing the supports for the tank shelf after I had lowered it:


    The starboard locker, with support for the motor shaft:


    And a general view from forward:


    I'll make the cockpit and cabin soles next, and design the bridge deck and c/board hoisting system.

    I have realised that it is a sheer fluke that I can put the motor into the starboard locker. It is only because I brought the cockpit seats closer together by 2 1/2 " (65 mm) on each side at the forward end to reduce the volume in the well in case I ever get pooped, of which the reciprocal was the widening of the lockers by that amount. Definitely more by good luck than good management. The motor is also narrower than most because the gear-lever is at the front, not the side.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 02-25-2018 at 08:23 PM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  27. #342
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Kilmelford
    Posts
    78

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ian, I hope you're well.

    I had an enforced break getting my foot sorted by our wonderful NHS but am now mobile again and getting on.

    I've annexed a couple of photos showing the cabin interior layout, self-explanatory I think.

    The sardine stove will go to port behind the bulkhead.

    Kotik cabin 1.jpgKotik cabin 2.jpg
    Ewan G Kennedy

  28. #343
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    Mar 2015
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    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    401

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Hi Ewan,
    I just lit up my computer to do a posting, and found your message. Yes, I'm OK thanks. Glad your foot is alright now. Thanks for the pics. You're making good progress. It looks a bit different from mine. You did explain that. I am keeping up with your "Scottish Boating" blog. Very interesting. That's a fine photo of the Peking, and a good article. We saw her in New York in 2004. I used to read the books about the "Flying P" sailing ships and others of that era. (I recommend "The War with Cape Horn", by Alan Villiers.)
    March was very busy for us with a lot of stuff not conducive to Kotik-building, but I'm back onto it now. Now, I'll sort out some photos for another instalment.
    Regards,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 04-22-2018 at 06:22 AM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  29. #344
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    401

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    So, here are some photos of the progress on my centreboard hoisting arrangement. The plans give no information at all on this, so it has been very slowly evolving in my mind. I looked at trailer winches but I couldn't see how I would be able to swing the handle, so I came back to the idea of a drum winch, similar to the one in the Eun Mara design, but putting it inside the bridge-deck, similar to the one on Bob Lewis's EM Morna, but a bit more clunky.

    I had to pack out the back of the cabin-bulkhead to make a flat base for the brackets. They are pieces cut from an old stainless-steel sink bench left here by the previous owners, already partly cut up. The flat piece is the piece I cut from the part-bulkhead of the starboard cockpit locker, already epoxy-coated. It slopes down so that water can drain into the centre-case.


    This shows the cardboard pattern for the cockpit sole, and the winch-drum dry assembled. The shaft is a left-over piece of my keel-bolt rod material, too short for the c/board pivot. The green bit is cut off the end of a piece of plastic pipe in my junk collection. The discs are 9mm 7-ply cut-outs from the deadlights of EM Islesburgh.


    I got out my one sheet of 18mm plywood and my wallpaper rudder pattern, to see where I could cut out a couple of pieces for the sides of the winch chamber.


    The framing for the cockpit sole.


    The winch-drum, ready to be glued together. I ground flats in the shaft so the glue would lock into them, and put high-density filler in the glue.


    I should have put the drum further to the right on the shaft. The ends of the shaft revolve easily in the two halves of a plastic bushing from a trailer spring, which are just slipped onto the ends. I want the drum to be removable. I have installed the plastic hatches now, so that I could get some extra sealant into the backs of the joints. The lower lid will fold down flat on the cabin sole, which I haven't made yet.


    I've got a bit further now, so I hope to put some pics of a working centreboard on here in a day or two.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Last edited by IanMilne; 04-22-2018 at 06:24 AM.
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  30. #345
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
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    401

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Well, "a day or two" was a bit optimistic, but that's the way it goes.

    The plans indicate a 40mm (1 1/2") pulley in the top of the case, but that would have meant cutting away parts of the top rail to accommodate the head and nut of the bolt, so I used a 50mm (2") pulley, which allowed the bolt to be lower. Then I found that I couldn't lower the board because the notch hit the pulley, so I chiselled away some of it, and in the process nicked the pendant (?) slightly, so I supported the board on sticks underneath, suspended it from a sky-hook, lifted it part-way out...


    and made a proper job of it. (And glued the box in somewhere along the way. )


    It took several stages, until it cleared the pulley fore and aft. It got three coats of antifouling, later.


    I bought some cord thick enough to handle and modified the drum to accommodate the knot in the end. The plywood discs on the right-hand end are not attached to the shaft. Here it is, all put together. I'm leaving the lines long at this stage, to make the final adjustments when she's in the water. Measuring from the plans, the pendant only goes in and out about 0.5m (20"). The board is intended to operate with the leading edge at 50 degrees from the horizontal. Any water that gets into the winch chamber can drain back into the centreboard case through the pendant hole. Pulling the board up is a bit of a heave, but it will be lighter in the water as half of it is wood (oak).


    Here is the view from inside the boat. I'm making the sole panels now. The lid of the lower hatch folds down flat.


    This is just an "ooh, aah" photo while she's off the trailer.


    Good, now I can build some more of the interior, then decide how much varnishing and/or painting to do before I start the deck framing.

    Cheers,
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  31. #346
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rushworth Australia
    Posts
    2,793

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Very neat Ian , i like the way your centreboard and winch is hidden away.

    im glad you didn’t have one of those NZ quakes with the boat perched up like that!
    Last edited by andrewpatrol; 05-01-2018 at 01:48 AM.

  32. #347
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Europe
    Posts
    9,073

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Great progress Ian. Nice job on the winch set up.

  33. #348
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    401

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Andrew and Ian. Yes, it seems to work pretty well.
    The boat is placed diagonally across the workshop to line it up under the overhead beams which are the lower chords of big trusses in the roof, and suspended by its two stems on "2-tonne cable-hoists" lashed to the beams over each end of the boat. The middle beam is over the centreboard pendant sheave, so I have a third cable-hoist on that one for lifting the centreboard. If I can lengthen the sliding cabin-roof hatch forward a few inches I will be able to line up the boat on its trailer in the right place and lift the board the same way, if I ever need to, but the boat will need straps around it for that as the stems will have been cut shorter by then.
    Last edited by IanMilne; 05-01-2018 at 02:54 PM. Reason: clarification
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
    Alan Byde, Canoe Design and Construction, Pelham Books, 1978

    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  34. #349
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    PNW, an island west of Seattle
    Posts
    1,636

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    That seems like a great deal of mechanism installed into a small space. A task that requires a lot of thought and planning. You've done it well, Ian.

    Great progress!

    Jeff

  35. #350
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    Posts
    401

    Default Re: Kotik, Kotik, Kotik!

    Thanks, Jeff. The idea of a drum-winch is certainly not original but the arrangement of it took a while to evolve in my mind.
    Ian

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