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Thread: SCAMP New Build

  1. #141
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    Feb 2006
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    Lenox, MA/Vineyard Haven, MA
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    Centerboard's a work of art. Love the sand/epoxy filler idea, though I bet it was hard to sand (unavoidable pun not intended)

  2. #142
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    Apr 2012
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    Louisville, KY
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    Heat doesn't transfer all that quick through stainless but the soldering iron will work every time. When I had a bunch of screws to remove from epoxying down the plywood decks, I just held the soldering iron on one head while unscrewing the one I just heated, which seemed to be the right amount of time. That way I didn't have any contaminants when I filled in the screw holes with additional epoxy.

  3. #143
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    Apr 2008
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    Ridgeway, Ontario
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    I've been sanding under the side decks so nothing much to photograph. I tried to clean up and finish the epoxy fillet but I only managed to fill a few spot. Nothing is very smooth. I think I have reached the "good enough" spot. It cannot be seen unless you use mirrors and it's smooth enough not to snag stuff.
    Time to prepare and glue in the side fence. It's harder to do than I expected because it has to be inserted bent and I had it boinginga few times before getting it in position for a dry run. Had to trim a little at the front of the piece.
    Put in lots of glue and re inserted the fence. At that point it was a simple job to gradually finalize the position and clamp the part in place.



    Shop has been quite cold and it takes a long time to warm up enough to epoxy. We've had a thaw so I could epoxy.


    I went around and cleaned up the squeezed out epoxy. A substantial and hopefully beautiful highly visible fillet goes in along the edge.
    There is a little gap at the very front that gets a triangular filler piece and the whole length will have a piece of wood on the edge, a gunnel maybe. I don't know what to call it.
    The starboard side is also ready to be glued.

    Glassing the side deck is optional, any suggestions?


    In the meantime I've been pre-bending the transom cap. It's been so cold nothing wants to bend. I add an extra piece of wood every few days to bend it more and get it close to the transom arc. I would prefer not to have too much tension on the cap.

  4. #144
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Christine DeMerchant View Post
    I've been sanding under the side decks so nothing much to photograph. I tried to clean up and finish the epoxy fillet but I only managed to fill a few spot. Nothing is very smooth. I think I have reached the "good enough" spot. It cannot be seen unless you use mirrors and it's smooth enough not to snag stuff.
    Time to prepare and glue in the side fence. It's harder to do than I expected because it has to be inserted bent and I had it boinginga few times before getting it in position for a dry run. Had to trim a little at the front of the piece.
    Put in lots of glue and re inserted the fence. At that point it was a simple job to gradually finalize the position and clamp the part in place.



    Shop has been quite cold and it takes a long time to warm up enough to epoxy. We've had a thaw so I could epoxy.


    I went around and cleaned up the squeezed out epoxy. A substantial and hopefully beautiful highly visible fillet goes in along the edge.
    There is a little gap at the very front that gets a triangular filler piece and the whole length will have a piece of wood on the edge, a gunnel maybe. I don't know what to call it.
    The starboard side is also ready to be glued.

    Glassing the side deck is optional, any suggestions?


    In the meantime I've been pre-bending the transom cap. It's been so cold nothing wants to bend. I add an extra piece of wood every few days to bend it more and get it close to the transom arc. I would prefer not to have too much tension on the cap.
    I can't make out what kind of wood you're using for the transom cap, being that you already have it bent I would not take it off and start soaking it, but you can just wet it down with water and if you have a heat gun warm it up. I've done pretty well with that. Good luck!

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  5. #145
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    Apr 2008
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    Ridgeway, Ontario
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    Hi Denise
    It's a very brittle "meranti" ply. Not bad material but stubborn when it comes to bending and quite resistant to wetting. I've tried the heat gun/wet rags but with limited success. I've had it in that set up for a couple of weeks and add another spacer every once in a while. I've also had the clothe iron on it a few times. Right now it's not under a lot of tension so I think it's working.
    Christine

  6. #146
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    I did not have to sand it because I was REALLY careful not to let it be higher than the edge. It would have been very difficult to sand.

  7. #147
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    Apr 2008
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build


    Before gluing on the coaming cap I had made the corner piece.
    I made a cardboard pattern to shape the gusset. Much to my surprise the same pattern fits both sides!



    A little beveling of edges and I was able to glue the pieces on. I had a lot of trouble getting it to clamp. I had taped a piece of wood to support the clamp but it kept slipping out of place. Eventually it stayed in place.
    Once set, I made small fillets and put a piece of glass over the gusset.

    The next morning it was easy to trim because the epoxy was still just a little soft. The weather has been quite cold so once I've left the shop and am not feeding the stove, the temperature goes down.



    I fitted the two little ends at the front.



    I also fitted the very back with a little piece to add a curve to the fence. It looked odd to me to have the cap just end an inch from the deck.



    Once everything was set I use the Japanese saw to roughly trim the coaming cap front and back.

  8. #148
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    Apr 2008
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    Ridgeway, Ontario
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build


    The belt sander made quick work of smoothing out the cap. I used a fine grit belt. I can take a lot of material off really quickly. (ask me how I know) I left the top flat. I'll round it once I've decided where and how the oar hardware is going to be installed.



    I put a board across the seats and pretended to row. I'd prefer to be as far forward as I can but with no chance of banging my head while I row. I don't think this is really critical. I'll put some reinforcements in the spot then I can round over the edges.



    I still have a bit of sanding to smooth the underside curve of the little piece that finishes the rail but otherwise I'm mostly done.



    I'm mostly happy with the angles but the very front needs some help. I expect I'll modify the bottom of the rail to smooth the line a bit.
    I took the photo where the bottom curve looks the worst.




    One more step completed. I still need to make a bunch of way too visible fillets.

    I've more photos on my website: https://www.christinedemerchant.com/...cks-fence.html

  9. #149
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    Jun 2017
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    spicewood, texas, usa
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    you are doing a beautiful job. congrats!

    jim

  10. #150
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    Apr 2008
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    Ridgeway, Ontario
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    I've set aside the hull and main boat for a break. I'll turn my efforts to finishing the rudder and rudder case.
    Earlier I had mostly shaped the rudder so I went and dug it up.
    https://www.christinedemerchant.com/...mp-rudder.html

    I also dug up the plans and took a good look at the rudder. Neither plans nor manual are particularly detailed.
    Without being rocket science there are some questions I had.
    Where exactly go the up and down lines. How do they attach to the tiller and where?
    How much play should there be between rudder blades and case? and many more.

    I decided to proceed slowly and that way any error or special point would be easier to catch.



    I traced the rudder blade and drafted the rudder case as best I could. Shape to suit is a bit scary when you don't know what is suitable.



    After checking that the rudder would rotate in a reasonable way and that the pivot point was ok I was confident that I could cut my wood. I did not have a lot of ply to spare so a mistake would mean either buying another sheet, expensive, particularly since I have to have it delivered, or piecing from thinner ply and adjusting the thickness. A lot of work.
    After adjusting the position of the pivot I deemed it good enough.



    I had to figure out where the up and down lines would go through before cutting. The plan indicated where the tiller went through so I know that just below that would work.
    The wood is rough cut. I was not confident that my plans was exact so I rough cut a bit larger.
    That means that later I could adjust but it also means that things would be more difficult to align.



    I assembled the case with small finishing nails that come out easily and cut the front, that gets installed against the boat, accurately. I also cut the very bottom and the curve of the back edge and bottom.

    I set it up with a nail in the pivot of the blade and checked it again. Adjusted the slot that houses the down line when the blade is up. It needed to be slightly wider.
    Last edited by Christine DeMerchant; 02-08-2018 at 01:47 PM.

  11. #151
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    Some Scamp builders have put copper tube as a conduit for the up and down lines. I liked the look of this so I decided to try it.




    I cut the tiller opening and rough cut the slots for the copper tube. I'm using 3/8 but I think most people have used 1/4 inch.



    In order to flare the end I used a plumb bob, then a piece of round ended shaped steel rod.
    In order to hold the copper pipe I made a hole in a scrap and cut it open. That allowed me to hammer on it. The paper is some sandpaper that gives me better grip.



    I had to chisel out a deeper channel for the pipe.



    The pipe fit well and any gap will be filled with thickened epoxy.



    The pipe and the wood are epoxied together. I did left and right sides separately to control lots of slippery parts more easily. I used screws to align up the pieces and got them off before they had set permanently.



    I glued the 2 parts together. I'm using some glass between them, mostly because I want to add to the thickness. I'm hoping to end up with about 3mm extra thickness so the blade can pivot nicely with a couple of thin washers.

  12. #152
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    Apr 2008
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    Ridgeway, Ontario
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build



    The pivot point had been marked and I cut the opening for the bronze bushings. The opening was exactly the same diametre so I enlarged them slightly with a file and sandpaper.

    rudder-inserts-ready.jpg



    The cheeks got some glass front and back.




    The bushing fits loosely in the hole. Thickened epoxy takes up the looseness and hopefully it's never moving. There is not a lot of stress on the bushing to make it go sideways and come out so I won't worry.

  13. #153
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    You are doing a great job!
    Looks great!
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  14. #154
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    Apr 2008
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build



    Glassed the blade after some sanding and enlarging the pivot hole.



    Once inside pieces of the rudder case were set, I cleaned up the edge and rough cut the copper pipe. I'll use the belt sander to smooth the whole assembly when it's glued up.

    I spent some time giving the edges that are closed in a good finish. This is the inside of the tiller channel, and the area where the blade pivots. There is no sanding after it's assembled. Or rather it's difficult to sand.



    I went to the lumber mill and got me a really nice piece of black walnut. The image is a bit yellower than in reality. It is lovely, clear wood. I'ts earmarked for the tiller. Some leftovers too.

    At this point I need to fill the weave of the cheeks, clean up any inside surface, and glue up the case. Epoxy is too soft to sand today so I have to wait a bit.

    Meanwhile, I'm going to go spend some quality time with my snow blower. We had a wee snow storm yesterday.

  15. #155
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    Apr 2011
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    Vancouver, BC
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    109

    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    Looking very good, Christine. I've only got about 1 or 2mm clearance between the cheeks and the rudder body, so no washers. 3 seasons on it so far, works flawlessly!

    Cheers,
    Dale

  16. #156
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    I guess I will stop worring about the clearance. 3 mm total, or just a bit larger, will be about what I have and each of the stainless washers I have is 1mm thick so that would work just fine.
    Thanks.
    Christine
    Last edited by Christine DeMerchant; 02-08-2018 at 02:53 PM.

  17. #157
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    After much fussing, measuring, more fussing, procrastinating, I glued up the case.



    I screwed and clamped the inside to the cheaks. I had inserted the pivot bolt to make sure everything lined up.
    After all that worring, it went together with no problems whatsoever.



    After a bit of sanding with the belt sander and random orbital sander the case finally was shaped. There are still a few spots to fill and sand but it is essentially done except for the hole that allows a pin to secure the tiller. I'll make the hole when I have the pin.

    I took much longer to put this together than I expected. I started not understanding how the rudder worked and it took a lot of figuring out to understand what was important and what was trivial. If I had to redo again I would half the time. Isn't that always the way.

  18. #158
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    I put a strip of glass on the edge of the rudder blade and top. I taped it in place and trimmed before it had set. A little burnishing of the gummy edge almost got rid of the ridge.




    The edge looks milky but in real life it has gone down very well. I'll put a couple layers of epoxy and it will be invisible.





    Rudder blade is almost done now. Some epoxy, sanding, and holes for up and down lines. It moves very nicely in the case.

    Found a supplier for pintles and gudgeons for the rudder. Not much choice, either Racelite Stainless, useful but not pretty, or ancy fancy bronze, gorgeous but mightily expensive. Eventually I went for the Davey and co bronze. There is a supplier not too far from here so I called them and they will bring it in. Can't easily bring it from the States. Between Pounds, US dollars, exchanges, taxes, duty and delivery, I need a mortgage on my first born.

  19. #159
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    Apr 2008
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    Ridgeway, Ontario
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    The Scamp Transom gets a cap and there is a doubler under it.





    It was a bit fiddly to get in place. Here is the dry run. I put some screws and used a cheap dollar store ratchet strap to pull it in position.

    After gluing I made a cardboard template and cut the doubler. I'm not sure what happened but the piece was still too wide. I managed to get it in but I had at least 3/16 to trim.




    After a few tense moments I got the doubler in and clamped. The hard part is bending it at the same time as pushing it in place. Eventually I sort of clamped the top loosely and wiggled the part in. Everything was pretty much gummed up but there are no significant gaps and it's properly clamped.



    I used the random orbital sander and 60 grit to trim the doubler to the cap. I had to be careful at the end. Used the Dremel multi tool. It sort of vibrates back and forth. I put a small saw attachment and it trimmed the overhangs near the deck without damaging the deck.



    Got the back trimmed flush. I'll need to fill a couple of spots where the cap meets the gunwales but nothing outrageous.

  20. #160
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    I shaped a piece of ash to help support the oar socket. I think It could also be a place of attachment for a bumper or whatever.



    It looks simple to shape but there is not a single square angle. I even curved the back slightly to accommodate the curve of the hull.



    It looks good (to my eyes). I had the socket already. I put a similar one on my Skerry and it has worked very well. I'm planning to use the same oars. They are only 7.5 feet or just over but it seems ridiculous to buy another set of oars just to get out of the marina. This SCAMP makes no pretense of being a row boat. I'll reconsider if the boat really hates the shorter oars.



    I had to fit both sides separately. I realized that the starboard fence is just a bit higher, or rather glued just a bit higher. That is the result of a gluing mistake when I first put together the bulkheads and the sides of the bench. In one bulkhead the slot had not been pushed all the way down when I glued it. I had to do some adjustments for the hull planks but they went on fine after, but I forgot to adjust the carlings at that level. It's just short of 3/16 difference. Annoying but not tragic. Amazing what one neglected tap of the mallet can result in.
    I need to make a bunch of NICE fillet on the side now. Not my forte.

  21. #161
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Christine DeMerchant View Post
    I shaped a piece of ash to help support the oar socket. I think It could also be a place of attachment for a bumper or whatever.



    It looks simple to shape but there is not a single square angle. I even curved the back slightly to accommodate the curve of the hull.



    It looks good (to my eyes). I had the socket already. I put a similar one on my Skerry and it has worked very well. I'm planning to use the same oars. They are only 7.5 feet or just over but it seems ridiculous to buy another set of oars just to get out of the marina. This SCAMP makes no pretense of being a row boat. I'll reconsider if the boat really hates the shorter oars.



    I had to fit both sides separately. I realized that the starboard fence is just a bit higher, or rather glued just a bit higher. That is the result of a gluing mistake when I first put together the bulkheads and the sides of the bench. In one bulkhead the slot had not been pushed all the way down when I glued it. I had to do some adjustments for the hull planks but they went on fine after, but I forgot to adjust the carlings at that level. It's just short of 3/16 difference. Annoying but not tragic. Amazing what one neglected tap of the mallet can result in.
    I need to make a bunch of NICE fillet on the side now. Not my forte.
    Keep up the great work looking good! There is a whole discussion on another Thread about oars basically it's based on the beam and the height of of the water you'll be sitting so let that be your guide.

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  22. #162
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    Purely for future reference, in the notes for J.W.'s Tender Behind he suggests coating screws in a silicone-based car polish before sinking into an epoxied connection. I've had good luck with this -- as long as I pull the screws after a day or two. Leave them a week and yeah, break out the soldering iron.
    "The future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed." William Gibson

  23. #163
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    Apr 2008
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    Ridgeway, Ontario
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    Quote Originally Posted by webishop14 View Post
    Purely for future reference, in the notes for J.W.'s Tender Behind he suggests coating screws in a silicone-based car polish before sinking into an epoxied connection. I've had good luck with this -- as long as I pull the screws after a day or two. Leave them a week and yeah, break out the soldering iron.
    I am deadly afraid of using silicone anywhere near a project that is going to get painted. Once the silicone gets on it's really hard to remove. Ask me how I know!! You can't see it and it seems to transfer.


    I had problems a few time. Once it was from silicone in a hair conditioner. Another time, from a machinery spray to use on the top of table saws to help the stuff glide through.

    I've changed the screws I use for clamping. I'm using pocket hole screws. Steel with a big washer like head. So far no problem whatsoever. It's not stainless but I'm taking them off. I also have a cloth with oil on it I use to wipe the screws.

  24. #164
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    Keep up the great work looking good! There is a whole discussion on another Thread about oars basically it's based on the beam and the height of of the water you'll be sitting so let that be your guide.

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    It's always tricky deciding. I have these perfectly gorgeous oars I use with the Skerry. I know they are a bit short but I'm not planning to row much. It seems ridiculous to buy a fourth pair of oars just to get out of the marina or get home IF I get becalmed.

  25. #165
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Christine DeMerchant View Post
    It's always tricky deciding. I have these perfectly gorgeous oars I use with the Skerry. I know they are a bit short but I'm not planning to row much. It seems ridiculous to buy a fourth pair of oars just to get out of the marina or get home IF I get becalmed.
    You built a boat you can build the oars! but then some aren't that expensive,

    I looked up your boat the beam is 5' 5" ? Pretty sure you're going to need longer oars that's if you want to get home and you're "out there"
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  26. #166
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    You built a boat you can build the oars! but then some aren't that expensive,

    I looked up your boat the beam is 5' 5" ? Pretty sure you're going to need longer oars that's if you want to get home and you're "out there"
    I

    I just went to the shop and tried my oars against the boat. It's not looking good. I think you are right.
    When the boat is out of the shop and the oars are not bumping into the band saw I'll be able to judge a bit better.

    CD

  27. #167
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    For screws that need to be removed,a smear of wax,rather than silicone,has usually worked for me.

  28. #168
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    I have an old block of parrafin wax I use around the shop. I also keep a bottle of mineral oil for the sharpening stones and screws.

  29. #169
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    Great work Christine, very exciting.
    Absolutely loving your work, right up my street.
    “Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge” - Charles Darwin (1809–1882)

    Nutshell Pram Build pictures ; https://photos.app.goo.gl/1GdBcckcgBAWsbVg1

  30. #170
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    Great story and photos! Thanks!
    I love the smell of fresh cut plywood in the morning.

  31. #171
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    Ridgeway, Ontario
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build



    Earlier I had glued the sides of the cabin/cuddy and fitted the side beams that support the roof. I had put a small bevel with the table saw but I used the plane to fit the wood to the curve of the roof.


    The wood overhangs front and back. I'll trim that after the roof is installed. The ash I'm using is lovely wood to plane and easily produces long even curls.



    I glued in the mast ramp. I'll need to do some cleaning up and filling of the various contact sports but it's in solidly.



    Before I could glue the roof I wanted to put in a doubler to the front panel so that the roof would have something to glue on to. I will be putting lots of fillets after the roof is glued on.



    I tried the roof on for size and had to enlarge the mast hole just a bit at the front, otherwise, the fit is good.

  32. #172
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build



    The roof has been fitted and I tried to pull it in place using straps but the area around the opening kept going up. It sort of bulges up around the second strap.
    I tried strapping it in place with a 2x4 on the side of the mast but this did not work very well and the curve wasn't fair.


    In the end I decided to put a row of screws to keep the plywood on the side of the mast opening, down.
    This worked well but will create a bit of a flat spot I think.
    I did yet another dry run and everything seemed to be ok. The front overhang is just a bit shorter than the doubler prepared for it and the roof is just short of the side of the cuddy. I prepared a very short extension in the same 6mm plywood and will glue it in after the roof doubler is installed. It's easier than trimming both sides of the cuddy.


    Lots of glue, a good coat of epoxy on the roof interior, the sides of the mast are screwed in.



    The straps pulled the roof on without any trouble. I added clamps fore and aft to position the roof better but otherwise nothing bad happened.



    Once the roof was on I went around and removed any extra glue and filled spots that had not quite gotten enough glue. I let everything set and later that evening I went in to loosen the screws and break the glue bond. I let everything set for a couple of days.
    I went to the Hamilton Wood Working Show and drooled on the machinery and stocked up on sandpaper.

  33. #173
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build



    Before gluing the roof I had traced and cut a short extension. I cut it oversize but I only need about a quarter inch. The alternative is to trim the sides of the cuddy. This is easier. Since there is a doubler plus I'm planning to glass the top, I don't think strength is an issue.


    Here is the doubler being glued in along with the small extension piece. The straps and end clamps are still holding the roof in place. This epoxy takes a week to reach full cure although it's workable overnight and sandable after about 30 hours.



    The roof is now glued on. There is lots of trimming at the edges to do. I'll also go around and fill any area that's a bit rough. It's interesting that the curve of the roof piece is greater than the curve of the side of the cuddy. Somehow I must have not curved the cuddy side quite as much as expected. Too late to worry about that now. The roof will be trimmed to match the curve of the cuddy side. Epoxy too gummy to sand yet.

  34. #174
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    Default Re: SCAMP New Build

    I posted this image on my facebook page and Simeon Baldwin suggested building up the edges of mast ramp to allow for a boot to sit on the opening to stop rain from coming in. He suggested 3/4 on an inch to allow for snap fittings to be installed.

    That seems like a very good idea. Any reason why this would not be advisable?


  35. #175
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    Great work. I've been building mine for nearly 5 1/2 years. You've nearly caught me. I'd better get back onto mine soon and get her wet.

    Sent from a phone.
    When I first joined WBF they made me write a book to prove I was a real yachty. I was so gullible.
    Paperback E-book

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